1532

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1532 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1532
MDXXXII
Ab urbe condita 2285
Armenian calendar 981
ԹՎ ՋՁԱ
Assyrian calendar 6282
Balinese saka calendar 1453–1454
Bengali calendar 939
Berber calendar 2482
English Regnal year 23  Hen. 8   24  Hen. 8
Buddhist calendar 2076
Burmese calendar 894
Byzantine calendar 7040–7041
Chinese calendar 辛卯(Metal  Rabbit)
4228 or 4168
     to 
壬辰年 (Water  Dragon)
4229 or 4169
Coptic calendar 1248–1249
Discordian calendar 2698
Ethiopian calendar 1524–1525
Hebrew calendar 5292–5293
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1588–1589
 - Shaka Samvat 1453–1454
 - Kali Yuga 4632–4633
Holocene calendar 11532
Igbo calendar 532–533
Iranian calendar 910–911
Islamic calendar 938–939
Japanese calendar Kyōroku 5 / Tenbun 1
(天文元年)
Javanese calendar 1450–1451
Julian calendar 1532
MDXXXII
Korean calendar 3865
Minguo calendar 380 before ROC
民前380年
Nanakshahi calendar 64
Thai solar calendar 2074–2075
Tibetan calendar 阴金兔年
(female Iron-Rabbit)
1658 or 1277 or 505
     to 
阳水龙年
(male Water-Dragon)
1659 or 1278 or 506
November 16: Battle of Cajamarca Inca-Spanish confrontation.JPG
November 16: Battle of Cajamarca

Year 1532 ( MDXXXII ) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Monday is any year with 366 days that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are GF, such as the years 1912, 1940, 1968, 1996, 2024, 2052, 2080, and 2120 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2008, 2036, and 2064 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Common years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 343 days remain until the end of the year.

São Vicente, São Paulo Municipality in Southeast, Brazil

São Vicente is a coastal municipality at southern São Paulo, Brazil. It is part of the Metropolitan Region of Baixada Santista. The population is 355,542 in an area of 147.89 square kilometres.

Portugal Republic in Southwestern Europe

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic, is a country located mostly on the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe. It is the westernmost sovereign state of mainland Europe, being bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and east by Spain. Its territory also includes the Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira, both autonomous regions with their own regional governments.

JulyDecember

July 23 is the 204th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 161 days remain until the end of the year.

August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 140 days remain until the end of the year.

Union of Brittany and France

The union of Brittany and France was a critical step in the formation of modern-day France. Brittany had been a semi-independent component of the Kingdom of France since Clovis I was given authority over the Gallo-Roman domain during the 5th century. It was first recorded as a "duchy" during the rule of Nominoe in 846. Over the centuries, the fealty demonstrated by the Duchy of Brittany toward the French king depended significantly on the individuals holding the two titles, as well as the involvement of the English monarchy at that particular time. The reign of Francis II, Duke of Brittany, was at an especially crucial time, as the nobles struggled to maintain their autonomy against the increasing central authority desired by Louis XI of France. As a result of several wars, treaties, and papal decisions, Brittany was united with France through the eventual marriage of Louis XI's son Charles VIII to the heiress of Brittany, Anne in 1491. However, because of the different systems of inheritance between the two realms, the crown and the duchy were not held by the same hereditary claimant until the reign of Henry II, beginning 1547.

Date unknown

<i>The Prince</i> political treatise by Niccolò Machiavelli

The Prince is a 16th-century political treatise by the Italian diplomat and political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli. From his correspondence, a version appears to have been distributed in 1513, using a Latin title, De Principatibus. However, the printed version was not published until 1532, five years after Machiavelli's death. This was carried out with the permission of the Medici pope Clement VII, but "long before then, in fact since the first appearance of The Prince in manuscript, controversy had swirled about his writings".

Niccolò Machiavelli 16th-century Italian politician and writer

Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli was an Italian diplomat, politician, historian, philosopher, humanist, writer, playwright and poet of the Renaissance period. He has often been called the father of modern political science. For many years he served as a senior official in the Florentine Republic with responsibilities in diplomatic and military affairs. He wrote comedies, carnival songs, and poetry. His personal correspondence is renowned by Italian scholars. He worked as secretary to the Second Chancery of the Republic of Florence from 1498 to 1512, when the Medici were out of power. He wrote his best-known work The Prince in 1513, having been exiled from city affairs.

François Rabelais 16th-century French writer and humanist

François Rabelais was a French Renaissance writer, physician, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar. He has historically been regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, bawdy jokes and songs. His best known work is Gargantua and Pantagruel. Because of his literary power and historical importance, Western literary critics consider him one of the great writers of world literature and among the creators of modern European writing. His literary legacy is such that today, the word Rabelaisian has been coined as a descriptive inspired by his work and life. Merriam-Webster defines the word as describing someone or something that is "marked by gross robust humor, extravagance of caricature, or bold naturalism".

Battle of the Maule

The Battle of the Maule was fought between a coalition of Mapuche people of Chile and the Inca Empire of Peru. Traditionally this battle is held to have occurred near what is now Maule River, in Central Chile. The account of Garcilaso de la Vega depicts the three-day battle, which is generally believed to have occurred in the reign of Tupac Inca Yupanqui, marked the end of the Incas' southward expansion.

Inca Empire empire in pre-Columbian America

The Inca Empire, also known as the Incan Empire and the Inka Empire, was the largest empire in pre-Columbian America. Its political and administrative structure is considered by most scholars to have been the most developed in the Americas before Columbus' arrival. The administrative, political and military center of the empire was located in the city of Cusco. The Inca civilization arose from the Peruvian highlands sometime in the early 13th century. Its last stronghold was conquered by the Spanish in 1572.

Mapuche ethnic group

The Mapuche are a group of indigenous inhabitants of south-central Chile and southwestern Argentina, including parts of present-day Patagonia. The collective term refers to a wide-ranging ethnicity composed of various groups who shared a common social, religious and economic structure, as well as a common linguistic heritage as Mapudungun speakers. Their influence once extended from the Aconcagua River to the Chiloé Archipelago and spread later eastward to the Argentine pampa. Today the collective group makes up over 80% of the indigenous peoples in Chile, and about 9% of the total Chilean population. They are particularly concentrated in Araucanía. Many have migrated to the Santiago and Buenos Aires area for economic opportunities.

Births

Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester Robert Dudley Leicester.jpg
Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester

January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 344 days remain until the end of the year.

Ludwig Helmbold German classical singer

Ludwig Helmbold, also spelled Ludwig Heimbold, was a poet of Lutheran hymns. He is probably best known for his hymn "Nun laßt uns Gott dem Herren", of which J. S. Bach used the fifth stanza for his cantata O heilges Geist- und Wasserbad, BWV 165; Bach also used his words in BWV 73, 79 and 186a.

1598 Year

1598 (MDXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1598th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 598th year of the 2nd millennium, the 98th year of the 16th century, and the 9th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1598, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Deaths

Cardinal Pompeo Colonna Cardinal Pompeo Colonna.png
Cardinal Pompeo Colonna
Reverend William Warham Hans Holbein d. J. 066.jpg
Reverend William Warham

Related Research Articles

1572 Year

Year 1572 (MDLXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1650 Year

1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1650th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 650th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1650, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1619 Year

1619 (MDCXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1619th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 619th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1619, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1627 Year

1627 (MDCXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1627th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 627th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1627, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1629 Year

1629 (MDCXXIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1629th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 629th year of the 2nd millennium, the 29th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1629, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1634 Year

1634 (MDCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1634th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 634th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1634, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1639 Year

1639 (MDCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1639th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 639th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1639, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1585 Year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1585th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 585th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1591 Year

1591 (MDXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1591st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 591st year of the 2nd millennium, the 91st year of the 16th century, and the 2nd year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1591, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1584 Year

1584 (MDLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1584th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 584th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 16th century, and the 5th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1584, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1581 Year

Year 1581 (MDLXXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, and a common year starting on Thursday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1578 Year

Year 1578 (MDLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1577 Year

Year 1577 (MDLXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1647 Year

1647 (MDCXLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1647th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 647th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1647, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1563 Year

Year 1563 (MDLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Rachel Lawrence: 2010, Page 183
  2. article on the Nuremberg Religious Peace, page 351 of the 1899 Lutheran Cyclopedia
  3. Foucault, Michel (January 30, 2013). Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason. books.google.com. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. p. 47. Retrieved March 2, 2015.
  4. Silva Galdames, Osvaldo (1983). "¿Detuvo la batalla del Maule la expansión inca hacia el sur de Chile?". Cuadernos de Historia (in Spanish). 3: 7–25. Retrieved January 10, 2019.