1375

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1375 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1375
MCCCLXXV
Ab urbe condita 2128
Armenian calendar 824
ԹՎ ՊԻԴ
Assyrian calendar 6125
Balinese saka calendar 1296–1297
Bengali calendar 782
Berber calendar 2325
English Regnal year 48  Edw. 3   49  Edw. 3
Buddhist calendar 1919
Burmese calendar 737
Byzantine calendar 6883–6884
Chinese calendar 甲寅(Wood  Tiger)
4071 or 4011
     to 
乙卯年 (Wood  Rabbit)
4072 or 4012
Coptic calendar 1091–1092
Discordian calendar 2541
Ethiopian calendar 1367–1368
Hebrew calendar 5135–5136
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1431–1432
 - Shaka Samvat 1296–1297
 - Kali Yuga 4475–4476
Holocene calendar 11375
Igbo calendar 375–376
Iranian calendar 753–754
Islamic calendar 776–777
Japanese calendar Ōan 8 / Eiwa 1
(永和元年)
Javanese calendar 1288–1289
Julian calendar 1375
MCCCLXXV
Korean calendar 3708
Minguo calendar 537 before ROC
民前537年
Nanakshahi calendar −93
Thai solar calendar 1917–1918
Tibetan calendar 阳木虎年
(male Wood-Tiger)
1501 or 1120 or 348
     to 
阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
1502 or 1121 or 349

Year 1375 ( MCCCLXXV ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 261 days remaining until the end of the year.

Egypt Country spanning North Africa and Southwest Asia

Egypt, officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia by a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula. Egypt is a Mediterranean country bordered by the Gaza Strip and Israel to the northeast, the Gulf of Aqaba and the Red Sea to the east, Sudan to the south, and Libya to the west. Across the Gulf of Aqaba lies Jordan, across the Red Sea lies Saudi Arabia, and across the Mediterranean lie Greece, Turkey and Cyprus, although none share a land border with Egypt.

Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia former country

The Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, also known as the Cilician Armenia, Lesser Armenia, or New Armenia, was an independent principality formed during the High Middle Ages by Armenian refugees fleeing the Seljuq invasion of Armenia. Located outside the Armenian Highland and distinct from the Armenian Kingdom of antiquity, it was centered in the Cilicia region northwest of the Gulf of Alexandretta.

Date unknown

Battle of Gardiki

The Battle of Geraki took place in c. 1375 between the Latin Principality of Achaea and the Byzantine Greek Despotate of the Morea, at the fortress of Gardiki in Arcadia, southern Greece.

Principality of Achaea Crusader principality in southern Greece

The Principality of Achaea or of the Morea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. It became a vassal of the Kingdom of Thessalonica, along with the Duchy of Athens, until Thessalonica was captured by Theodore, the despot of Epirus, in 1224. After this, Achaea became for a while the dominant power in Greece.

Despotate of the Morea

The Despotate of the Morea or Despotate of Mystras was a province of the Byzantine Empire which existed between the mid-14th and mid-15th centuries. Its territory varied in size during its existence but eventually grew to include almost all the southern Greek peninsula known as the Peloponnese, which was known as the Morea during the medieval and early modern periods. The territory was usually ruled by one or more sons of the current Byzantine emperor, who were given the title of despotes. Its capital was the fortified city of Mystras, near ancient Sparta, which became an important centre of the Palaiologan Renaissance.

Births

October tenth month in the Julian and Gregorian calendars

October is the tenth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the sixth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The eighth month in the old Roman calendar, October retained its name after January and February were inserted into the calendar that had originally been created by the Romans. In Ancient Rome, one of three Mundus patet would take place on October 5, Meditrinalia October 11, Augustalia on October 12, October Horse on October 15, and Armilustrium on October 19. These dates do not correspond to the modern Gregorian calendar. Among the Anglo-Saxons, it was known as Ƿinterfylleþ, because at this full moon (fylleþ) winter was supposed to begin.

Joanna of Aragon was the only surviving child of John I of Aragon and his first wife Martha of Armagnac. She was a member of the House of Aragon and was Countess of Foix by her marriage to Matthew of Foix.

Year 1407 (MCDVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 254 days remaining until the end of the year.

Elisabeth of Meissen, Burgravine of Nuremberg was the daughter of Frederick II, Margrave of Meissen and Mathilde of Bavaria and a member of the House of Wettin.

Year 1329 (MCCCXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Related Research Articles

Year 1402 (MCDII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1380s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1380, and ended on December 31, 1389.

1028 Year

Year 1028 (MXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

The 1360s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1360, and ended on December 31, 1369.

1364 Year

Year 1364 (MCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1388 (MCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1457 (MCDLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1371 (MCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1393 (MCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1370s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1370, and ended on December 31, 1379.

Year 1340 (MCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1368 (MCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1384 (MCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1387 (MCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1396 (MCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1399 (MCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1401 (MCDI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1412 (MCDXII) was a leap year starting on Friday on the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Timeline of the Hundred Years War
  2. Brook, Timothy (1999), The Confusions of Pleasure: Commerce and Culture in Ming China, University of California Press, p. 32, ISBN   978-0-520-22154-3.