1324

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1324 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1324
MCCCXXIV
Ab urbe condita 2077
Armenian calendar 773
ԹՎ ՉՀԳ
Assyrian calendar 6074
Balinese saka calendar 1245–1246
Bengali calendar 731
Berber calendar 2274
English Regnal year 17  Edw. 2   18  Edw. 2
Buddhist calendar 1868
Burmese calendar 686
Byzantine calendar 6832–6833
Chinese calendar 癸亥(Water  Pig)
4020 or 3960
     to 
甲子年 (Wood  Rat)
4021 or 3961
Coptic calendar 1040–1041
Discordian calendar 2490
Ethiopian calendar 1316–1317
Hebrew calendar 5084–5085
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1380–1381
 - Shaka Samvat 1245–1246
 - Kali Yuga 4424–4425
Holocene calendar 11324
Igbo calendar 324–325
Iranian calendar 702–703
Islamic calendar 723–725
Japanese calendar Genkō 4 / Shōchū 1
(正中元年)
Javanese calendar 1235–1236
Julian calendar 1324
MCCCXXIV
Korean calendar 3657
Minguo calendar 588 before ROC
民前588年
Nanakshahi calendar −144
Thai solar calendar 1866–1867
Tibetan calendar 阴水猪年
(female Water-Pig)
1450 or 1069 or 297
     to 
阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1451 or 1070 or 298

Year 1324 ( MCCCXXIV ) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are AG, such as the years 1888, 1928, 1956, 1984, 2012, 2040, 2068, 2096, 2108, 2136, 2164, and 2192 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1996 and 2024 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

Date unknown

Marsilius of Padua Italian philosopher

Marsilius of Padua was an Italian scholar, trained in medicine, who practiced a variety of professions. He was also an important 14th-century political figure. His political treatise Defensor pacis, an attempt to refute papalist claims to a "plenitude of power" in affairs of both church and state, is seen by some authorities as the most revolutionary political treatise written in the later Middle Ages. It is one of the first examples of a reasoned defense of caesaropapism in Western Europe.

The tract Defensor pacis laid the foundations of modern doctrines of sovereignty. It was written by Marsilius of Padua, an Italian medieval scholar. It appeared in 1324 and provoked a storm of controversy that lasted through the century. The context of the work lies in the political struggle between Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor and Pope John XXII. The treatise is vehemently anticlerical. Marsilius' work was censured by Pope Benedict XII and Pope Clement VI.

Musa I of Mali Historical ruler in West Africa

Musa I or Mansa Musa was the tenth Mansa, which translates to "sultan", "conqueror", or "emperor", of the wealthy West African Islamic Mali Empire. At the time of Musa's rise to the throne, the Malian Empire consisted of territory formerly belonging to the Ghana Empire in present-day southern Mauritania and in Melle (Mali) and the immediate surrounding areas. Musa held many titles, including "Emir of Melle", "Lord of the Mines of Wangara", "Conqueror of Ghanata", and at least a dozen others. Mansa Musa conquered 24 cities, each with surrounding districts containing villages and estates. During his reign, Mali may have been the largest producer of gold in the world; it was at a point of exceptional demand for the commodity. One of the richest people in history, he is known to have been enormously wealthy; reported as being inconceivably rich by contemporaries, Time magazine reported: "There's really no way to put an accurate number on his wealth."

Births

March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 301 days remain until the end of the year.

David II of Scotland King of Scots

David II was King of Scots for over 41 years, from 1329 until his death in 1371. He was the last male of the House of Bruce. Although David spent long periods in exile or captivity, he managed to resist English attempts to annex his kingdom, and left the monarchy in a strong position.

Year 1371 (MCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

January 8 is the eighth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 357 days remain until the end of the year.

January 9 is the ninth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 356 days remain until the end of the year.

Marco Polo Venetian explorer and merchant noted for travel to central and eastern Asia

Marco Polo was an Venetian merchant, explorer, and writer, born in the Republic of Venice. His travels are recorded in Livre des merveilles du monde, a book that described to Europeans the wealth and great size of China, its capital Peking, and other Asian cities and countries.

Related Research Articles

1542 Year

Year 1542 (MDXLII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1322 (MCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1308 (MCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1338 (MCCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1374 (MCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1155 (MCLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1559 Year

Year 1559 (MDLIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1165 (MCLXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1377 (MCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1392 (MCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1401 (MCDI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1329 (MCCCXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1330 (MCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1332 (MCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1337 (MCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1298 (MCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1272 (MCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1198 (MCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1136 (MCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. "David II | king of Scotland". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved April 24, 2019.