1304

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1304 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1304
MCCCIV
Ab urbe condita 2057
Armenian calendar 753
ԹՎ ՉԾԳ
Assyrian calendar 6054
Balinese saka calendar 1225–1226
Bengali calendar 711
Berber calendar 2254
English Regnal year 32  Edw. 1   33  Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar 1848
Burmese calendar 666
Byzantine calendar 6812–6813
Chinese calendar 癸卯(Water  Rabbit)
4000 or 3940
     to 
甲辰年 (Wood  Dragon)
4001 or 3941
Coptic calendar 1020–1021
Discordian calendar 2470
Ethiopian calendar 1296–1297
Hebrew calendar 5064–5065
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1360–1361
 - Shaka Samvat 1225–1226
 - Kali Yuga 4404–4405
Holocene calendar 11304
Igbo calendar 304–305
Iranian calendar 682–683
Islamic calendar 703–704
Japanese calendar Kagen 2
(嘉元2年)
Javanese calendar 1215–1216
Julian calendar 1304
MCCCIV
Korean calendar 3637
Minguo calendar 608 before ROC
民前608年
Nanakshahi calendar −164
Thai solar calendar 1846–1847
Tibetan calendar 阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
1430 or 1049 or 277
     to 
阳木龙年
(male Wood-Dragon)
1431 or 1050 or 278

Year 1304 ( MCCCIV ) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

Emperor Go-Fukakusa Emperor Go-Fukakusa.jpg
Emperor Go-Fukakusa

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13th century Century

The 13th century was the century which lasted from January 1, 1201 through December 31, 1300 in accordance with the Julian calendar.

Year 1326 (MCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1204 (MCCIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1300s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1300, and ended on December 31, 1309.

Year 569 (DLXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 569 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

1147 Calendar year

Year 1147 (MCXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1220 (MCCXX) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. This is commonly known as a limbo year.

Year 1385 (MCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1401 (MCDI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1302 (MCCCII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1306 (MCCCVI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1292 (MCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1218 (MCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1056 Calendar year

Year 1056 (MLVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1183 (MCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1278 (MCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The Lordship of Chios was a short-lived autonomous lordship run by the Genoese Zaccaria family. Its core was the eastern Aegean island of Chios, and in its height it encompassed a number of other islands off the shore of Asia Minor. Although theoretically a vassal of the Byzantine Empire, the Zaccaria ruled the island as a practically independent domain from its capture in 1304 until the Greek-Byzantines recovered it, with the support of the local Greek population, in 1329.

Martino Zaccaria 14th-century Lord of Chios

Martino Zaccaria was the Lord of Chios from 1314 to 1329, ruler of several other Aegean islands, and baron of Veligosti–Damala and Chalandritsa in the Principality of Achaea. He distinguished himself in the fight against Turkish corsairs in the Aegean Sea, and received the title of "King and Despot of Asia Minor" from the titular Latin Emperor, Philip II. He was deposed from his rule of Chios by a Byzantine expedition in 1329, and imprisoned in Constantinople until 1337. Martino then returned to Italy, where he was named the Genoese ambassador to the Holy See. In 1343 he was named commander of the Papal squadron in the Smyrniote crusade against Umur Bey, ruler of the Emirate of Aydin, and participated in the storming of Smyrna in October 1344. He was killed, along with several other of the crusade's leaders, in a Turkish attack on 17 January 1345.

Benedetto I Zaccaria Italian admiral

Benedetto I Zaccaria was an Italian admiral of the Republic of Genoa. He was the Lord of Phocaea and first Lord of Chios, and the founder of Zaccaria fortunes in Byzantine and Latin Greece. He was, at different stages in his life, a diplomat, adventurer, mercenary, and statesman.

Year 1345 (MCCCXLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. It was a year in the 14th century, in the midst of a period in world history often referred to as the Late Middle Ages.

References

  1. The Oxford companion to Scottish history. Oxford University Press. p. 334. ISBN   9780199693054.
  2. Foss, Clive (1979). Ephesus After Antiquity: A Late Antique, Byzantine, and Turkish City. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 144. ISBN   0521220866.
  3. Lock, Peter (2013). The Routledge Companion to the Crusades. Routledge. p. 124. ISBN   9781135131371.
  4. Miller, William (1921). "The Zaccaria of Phocaea and Chios (1275-1329)". Essays on the Latin Orient. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp.  283–298.