842

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
842 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 842
DCCCXLII
Ab urbe condita 1595
Armenian calendar 291
ԹՎ ՄՂԱ
Assyrian calendar 5592
Balinese saka calendar 763–764
Bengali calendar 249
Berber calendar 1792
Buddhist calendar 1386
Burmese calendar 204
Byzantine calendar 6350–6351
Chinese calendar 辛酉(Metal  Rooster)
3538 or 3478
     to 
壬戌年 (Water  Dog)
3539 or 3479
Coptic calendar 558–559
Discordian calendar 2008
Ethiopian calendar 834–835
Hebrew calendar 4602–4603
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 898–899
 - Shaka Samvat 763–764
 - Kali Yuga 3942–3943
Holocene calendar 10842
Iranian calendar 220–221
Islamic calendar 227–228
Japanese calendar Jōwa 9
(承和9年)
Javanese calendar 739–740
Julian calendar 842
DCCCXLII
Korean calendar 3175
Minguo calendar 1070 before ROC
民前1070年
Nanakshahi calendar −626
Seleucid era 1153/1154 AG
Thai solar calendar 1384–1385
Tibetan calendar 阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
968 or 587 or −185
     to 
阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
969 or 588 or −184
Empress Theodora with her son Michael III Solidus-Michael III-sb1686.jpg
Empress Theodora with her son Michael III
Greek icon of Theodora (c. 815 - after 867) Theodora (greek icon XIX c).jpg
Greek icon of Theodora (c. 815 – after 867)

Year 842 ( DCCCXLII ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Byzantine Empire

January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 345 days remaining until the end of the year.

Theophilos (emperor) Byzantine emperor

Theophilos was the Byzantine Emperor from 829 until his death in 842. He was the second emperor of the Amorian dynasty and the last emperor to support iconoclasm. Theophilos personally led the armies in his lifelong war against the Arabs, beginning in 831.

Dysentery inflammation of the intestine causing diarrhea with blood

Dysentery is an inflammatory disease of the intestine, especially of the colon, which always results in severe diarrhea and abdominal pains. Other symptoms may include fever and a feeling of incomplete defecation. The disease is caused by several types of infectious pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites.

Europe

February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 320 days remaining until the end of the year.

Oaths of Strasbourg alliance

The Oaths of Strasbourg were mutual pledges of allegiance between Louis the German (†876), ruler of East Francia, and his half-brother Charles the Bald (†877), ruler of West Francia made on 12 February 842. They are written in three different languages: Medieval Latin, Old Gallo-Romance and Old High German, all in Caroline minuscule. The Romance passages are generally considered to be the earliest texts in a language that is distinctly Gallo-Romance.

Louis the German Frankish king

Louis "the German", also known as Louis II, was the first king of East Francia, and ruled from 843-876 AD. Grandson of emperor Charlemagne and the third son of emperor of Francia, Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, he received the appellation Germanicus shortly after his death in recognition of Magna Germania of the Roman Empire, reflecting the Carolingian's assertions that they were the rightful descendants of the Roman Empire

Britain

Uurad or Ferat son of Bargoit was king of the Picts, perhaps from 839 to 842.

Picts ancient and medieval tribal confederation in northern Britain

The Picts were a confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late Iron Age and Early Medieval periods. Where they lived and what their culture was like can be inferred from the geographical distribution of Brittonic place name elements and Pictish stones. The name Picts appears in written records from Late Antiquity to the 10th century, when they are thought to have merged with the Gaels. They lived to the north of the rivers Forth and Clyde, and spoke the Pictish language, which was closely related to the Celtic Brittonic language spoken by the Britons who lived to the south of them.

Bridei son of Uurad was king of the Picts, in modern Scotland, from 842 to 843. Two of his brothers, Ciniod and Drest, are also said, in the king lists of the Pictish Chronicle, to have reigned for a short time.

Abbasid Caliphate

January 5 is the fifth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 360 days remaining until the end of the year.

Al-Mutasim the eighth Abbasid Caliph

Abū Isḥāq Muḥammad ibn Hārūn al-Rashīd, better known by his regnal name al-Muʿtaṣim biʾllāh, was the eighth Abbasid caliph, ruling from 833 until his death in 842. A younger son of Caliph Harun al-Rashid, he rose to prominence through his formation of a private army composed predominantly of Turkish slave-soldiers (ghilmān). This proved useful to his half-brother, Caliph al-Ma'mun, who employed al-Mu'tasim and his Turkish guard to counterbalance other powerful interest groups in the state, as well as employing them in campaigns against rebels and the Byzantine Empire. When al-Ma'mun died unexpectedly on campaign in August 833, al-Mu'tasim was thus well placed to succeed him, overriding the claims of al-Ma'mun's son al-Abbas.

Abbasid Samarra

Samarra is a city in central Iraq, which served as the capital of the Abbasid Caliphate from 836 to 892. Founded by the caliph al-Mu'tasim, Samarra was briefly a major metropolis that stretched dozens of kilometers along the east bank of the Tigris, but was largely abandoned in the latter half of the 9th century, especially following the return of the caliphs to Baghdad.

Births

Al-Mundhir was Emir of Córdoba from 886 to 888. He was a member of the Umayyad dynasty of Al-Andalus, the son of Muhamad bin Abd al-Rahman.

Emir title of high office, used throughout the Muslim world.

An emir, sometimes transliterated amir, amier, or ameer, is an aristocratic or noble and military title of high office used in a variety of places in the Arab countries, West Africa, and Afghanistan. It means "commander", "general", or "High King". The feminine form is emira. When translated as "prince", the word "emirate" is analogous to a sovereign principality.

Abu Ahmad Talha ibn Ja'far, better known by his laqab as al-Muwaffaq bi-Allah, was an Abbasid prince and military leader, who acted as the de facto regent of the Abbasid Caliphate for most of the reign of his brother, Caliph al-Mu'tamid. His stabilization of the internal political scene after the decade-long "Anarchy at Samarra", his successful defence of Iraq against the Saffarids and the suppression of the Zanj Rebellion restored a measure of the Caliphate's former power and began a period of recovery, which culminated in the reign of al-Muwaffaq's own son, the Caliph al-Mu'tadid.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

821 Year

Year 821 (DCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

The 830s decade ran from January 1, 830, to December 31, 839.

The 840s decade ran from January 1, 840, to December 31, 849.

814 Year

Year 814 (DCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

844 Year

Year 844 (DCCCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

847 Year

Year 847 (DCCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

812 Year

Year 812 (DCCCXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

785 Year

Year 785 (DCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The article denomination 785 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. It is still used today in this manner.

820 Year

Year 820 (DCCCXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

841 Year

Year 841 (DCCCXLI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

846 Year

Year 846 (DCCCXLVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

848 Year

Year 848 (DCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

822 Year

Year 822 (DCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

829 Year

Year 829 (DCCCXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

833 Year

Year 833 (DCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

836 Year

Year 836 (DCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

837 Year

Year 837 (DCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

838 Year

Year 838 (DCCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

839 Year

Year 839 (DCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

866 Year

Year 866 (DCCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. John Skylitzes, A Synopsis of Byzantine History, 811—1057: Translation and Notes, transl. John Wortley, 81note114.
  2. Pierre Riche, The Carolingians: The Family who forged Europe, transl. Michael Idomir Allen, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1983), p. 162.