1540

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1540 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1540
MDXL
Ab urbe condita 2293
Armenian calendar 989
ԹՎ ՋՁԹ
Assyrian calendar 6290
Balinese saka calendar 1461–1462
Bengali calendar 947
Berber calendar 2490
English Regnal year 31  Hen. 8   32  Hen. 8
Buddhist calendar 2084
Burmese calendar 902
Byzantine calendar 7048–7049
Chinese calendar 己亥(Earth  Pig)
4236 or 4176
     to 
庚子年 (Metal  Rat)
4237 or 4177
Coptic calendar 1256–1257
Discordian calendar 2706
Ethiopian calendar 1532–1533
Hebrew calendar 5300–5301
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1596–1597
 - Shaka Samvat 1461–1462
 - Kali Yuga 4640–4641
Holocene calendar 11540
Igbo calendar 540–541
Iranian calendar 918–919
Islamic calendar 946–947
Japanese calendar Tenbun 9
(天文9年)
Javanese calendar 1458–1459
Julian calendar 1540
MDXL
Korean calendar 3873
Minguo calendar 372 before ROC
民前372年
Nanakshahi calendar 72
Thai solar calendar 2082–2083
Tibetan calendar 阴土猪年
(female Earth-Pig)
1666 or 1285 or 513
     to 
阳金鼠年
(male Iron-Rat)
1667 or 1286 or 514
October 1: Battle of Alboran Kadirga Minyatur.jpg
October 1: Battle of Alborán

Year 1540 ( MDXL ) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

JulyDecember

Date unknown

Births

John Sigismund Zapolya Jan Zygmunt Zapolya.jpg
John Sigismund Zápolya
Princess Cecilia of Sweden Cecilia of Baden-Rodemachern c 1610.jpg
Princess Cecilia of Sweden

Deaths

Angela Merici Saint Angela Merici.jpg
Angela Merici
Thomas Cromwell Cromwell,Thomas(1EEssex)01.jpg
Thomas Cromwell
Lebna Dengel Arolsen Klebeband 01 463 4.jpg
Lebna Dengel

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Year 1546 (MDXLVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1550 Calendar year

Year 1550 (MDL) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1614 1614

1614 (MDCXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1614th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 614th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1614, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1534 Calendar year

Year 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1578 Calendar year

Year 1578 (MDLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1570 Calendar year

Year 1570 (MDLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1664 1664

1664 (MDCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1664th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 664th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1664, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1674 1674

1674 (MDCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1674th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 674th year of the 2nd millennium, the 74th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1674, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1563 Calendar year

Year 1563 (MDLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1547 Calendar year

Year 1547 (MDXLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1549 Calendar year

Year 1549 (MDXLIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. In the Kingdom of England, it was known as "The Year of the Many-Headed Monster", because of the unusually high number of rebellions which occurred in the country.

1538 Calendar year

Year 1538 (MDXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1533 Calendar year

Year 1533 (MDXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1508 Calendar year

Year 1508 (MDVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1509 Calendar year

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Ranuccio I Farnese, Duke of Parma Duke of Parma and Piacenza

Ranuccio I Farnese reigned as Duke of Parma, Piacenza and Castro from 1592. A firm believer in absolute monarchy, Ranuccio, in 1594, centralised the administration of Parma and Piacenza, thus rescinding the nobles' hitherto vast prerogative. He is best remembered for the "Great Justice" of 1612, which saw the executions of a large number of Piacentine nobles suspected of plotting against him. Claudia Colla his mistress and her mother were accused of using witchcraft to stop him from having offsprings, and both were sentenced to death by burning. Because one of the conspirators, Gianfrancesco Sanvitale, falsely implicated several Italian princes, namely Vincenzo Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua and Cesare d'Este, Duke of Modena, in the plot, Vincenzo and Cesare's names appeared on the list of conspirators during formal court proceedings; as a result, Ranuccio's reputation among the rulers of Italy was irreparably damaged because it was evident that he gave credence to Gianfrancesco's obviously false confession. When, consequently, in the early 1620s, Ranuccio was looking for a bride for his younger legitimate son and heir, Odoardo, none of the Italian ruling families were forthcoming with princesses. He did, however, manage to engineer a match with Margherita de' Medici, daughter of Cosimo II of Tuscany.

References

  1. Drinkwater, John (1786). A history of the late siege of Gibraltar: With a description and account of that garrison, from the earliest periods. Printed by T. Spilsbury. p.  8 . Retrieved October 27, 2012.
  2. "Weather chronicler relates of medieval disasters". goDutch.com. October 7, 2003. Retrieved November 8, 2012.
  3. Johnson, Hugh (1989). Vintage: The Story of Wine . Simon and Schuster. pp.  284, 390. ISBN   0-671-68702-6.