1492

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1492 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1492
MCDXCII
Ab urbe condita 2245
Armenian calendar 941
ԹՎ ՋԽԱ
Assyrian calendar 6242
Balinese saka calendar 1413–1414
Bengali calendar 899
Berber calendar 2442
English Regnal year 7  Hen. 7   8  Hen. 7
Buddhist calendar 2036
Burmese calendar 854
Byzantine calendar 7000–7001
Chinese calendar 辛亥年 (Metal  Pig)
4188 or 4128
     to 
壬子年 (Water  Rat)
4189 or 4129
Coptic calendar 1208–1209
Discordian calendar 2658
Ethiopian calendar 1484–1485
Hebrew calendar 5252–5253
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1548–1549
 - Shaka Samvat 1413–1414
 - Kali Yuga 4592–4593
Holocene calendar 11492
Igbo calendar 492–493
Iranian calendar 870–871
Islamic calendar 897–898
Japanese calendar Entoku 4 / Meiō 1
(明応元年)
Javanese calendar 1409–1410
Julian calendar 1492
MCDXCII
Korean calendar 3825
Minguo calendar 420 before ROC
民前420年
Nanakshahi calendar 24
Thai solar calendar 2034–2035
Tibetan calendar 阴金猪年
(female Iron-Pig)
1618 or 1237 or 465
     to 
阳水鼠年
(male Water-Rat)
1619 or 1238 or 466

Year 1492 ( MCDXCII ) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar, the 1492nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 492nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 15th century, and the 3rd year of the 1490s decade.

Contents

1492 is considered to be a significant year in the history of the West, Europe, Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Spain, and the New World, among others, because of the number of significant events that took place.

The events which propelled the year into Western consciousness, listed below, include the completion of the Reconquista of Spain, Europe's (Spain) discovery of the New World, and the expulsion of Jews from Spain.

Events

January 2 - Muhammad XII, last Moorish Emir of Granada, surrenders his city to the army of Ferdinand and Isabella. La Rendicion de Granada - Pradilla.jpg
January 2 Muhammad XII, last Moorish Emir of Granada, surrenders his city to the army of Ferdinand and Isabella.
October 12 - Columbus reaches the Americas for Spain. Columbus Taking Possession.jpg
October 12 Columbus reaches the Americas for Spain.

Known dates

Unknown dates

Births

Queen Marguerite de Navarre Marguerite d'Angouleme.jpg
Queen Marguerite de Navarre
Duchess Sabina of Bavaria Sabine of Bavaria-Munich.jpg
Duchess Sabina of Bavaria

Deaths

Lorenzo de' Medici Verrocchio Lorenzo de Medici.jpg
Lorenzo de' Medici
King Casimir IV Jagiellon Casimir IV Jagiellon.PNG
King Casimir IV Jagiellon
Pope Innocent VIII Innocent VIII 1492.JPG
Pope Innocent VIII
Saint Beatrice of Silva RostroBeatrizSilva.jpg
Saint Beatrice of Silva

Exact date unknown

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1490s</span> Decade

The 1490s decade ran from January 1, 1490, to December 31, 1499.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1557</span> Calendar year

Year 1557 (MDLVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1503 Calendar year

Year 1503 (MDIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1500s (decade)</span> Decade

The 1500s ran from January 1, 1500, to December 31, 1509.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1519</span> Calendar year

Year 1519 (MDXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1519th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 519th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 16th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1510s decade.

Year 1478 (MCDLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1478th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 478th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 15th century, and the 9th year of the 1470s decade.

Year 1480 (MCDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1480th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 480th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 15th century, and the 1st year of the 1480s decade.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1493</span> Calendar year

Year 1493 (MCDXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1504</span> Calendar year

Year 1504 (MDIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1502 Calendar year

Year 1502 (MDII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1496 (MCDXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Catholic Monarchs of Spain</span> Title for Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon

The Catholic Monarchs were Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon, whose marriage and joint rule marked the de facto unification of Spain. They were both from the House of Trastámara and were second cousins, being both descended from John I of Castile; to remove the obstacle that this consanguinity would otherwise have posed to their marriage under canon law, they were given a papal dispensation by Sixtus IV. They married on October 19, 1469, in the city of Valladolid; Isabella was eighteen years old and Ferdinand a year younger. It is generally accepted by most scholars that the unification of Spain can essentially be traced back to the marriage of Ferdinand and Isabella.

<i>1492: Conquest of Paradise</i> 1992 film directed by Ridley Scott

1492: Conquest of Paradise is a 1992 epic historical drama film directed and produced by Ridley Scott and starring Gérard Depardieu, Armand Assante, and Sigourney Weaver. It portrays a version of the travels to the New World by the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus and the effect this had on indigenous peoples.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bartholomew Columbus</span> Italian explorer (c. 1461 – 1515)

Bartholomew Columbus was an Italian explorer from Genoa and the younger brother of Christopher Columbus.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Crown of Castile</span> Former country in the Iberian Peninsula from 1230 to 1715

The Crown of Castile was a medieval polity in the Iberian Peninsula that formed in 1230 as a result of the third and definitive union of the crowns and, some decades later, the parliaments of the kingdoms of Castile and León upon the accession of the then Castilian king, Ferdinand III, to the vacant Leonese throne. It continued to exist as a separate entity after the personal union in 1469 of the crowns of Castile and Aragon with the marriage of the Catholic Monarchs up to the promulgation of the Nueva Planta decrees by Philip V in 1715.

<i>Tanto monta, monta tanto, Isabel como Fernando</i>

Tanto monta, monta tanto, Isabel como Fernando or simply Tanto monta, monta tanto was the alleged motto of a prenuptial agreement made by the Spanish Catholic Monarchs Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon. During their joint reign they did in fact support each other effectively in accordance with their motto of equality. Still, the wording "Tanto monta, monta tanto, Isabel como Fernando" is actually a popular saying invented many centuries later, not the real motto. Besides, and contrary to popular belief, Tanto monta was only the motto of King Ferdinand of Aragon, and never used by Isabella.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ferdinand II of Aragon</span> King of Aragon, Sicily, Sardinia, Naples, and Castile (1452–1516)

Ferdinand II, also called Ferdinand the Catholic, was King of Aragon and Sardinia from 1479, King of Sicily from 1468, King of Naples from 1504 and King of Navarre from 1512 until his death in 1516. He was also the Duke (nominal) of the ancient Duchies of Athens and Neopatria. He was King of Castile and León from 1475 to 1504, alongside his wife Queen Isabella I. From 1506 to 1516, he was the Regent of the Crown of Castile, making him the effective ruler of Castile. From 1511 to 1516, he styled himself as Imperator totius Africa after having conquered Tlemcen and making the Zayyanid Sultan, Abu Abdallah V, his vassal. He was also the Grandmaster of the Spanish Military Orders of Santiago (1499-1516), Calatrava (1487-1516), Alcantara (1492-1516) and Montesa (1499-1516), after he permanently annexed them into the Spanish Crown. He reigned jointly with Isabella over a dynastically unified Spain; together they are known as the Catholic Monarchs. Ferdinand is considered the de facto first King of Spain, and was described as such during his reign.

Capitulations of Santa Fe Signed document between Christopher Columbus and the rulers of Spain

The Capitulations of Santa Fe between Christopher Columbus and the Catholic Monarchs, Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon, were signed in Santa Fe, Granada on April 17, 1492. They granted Columbus the titles of admiral of the Ocean Sea, viceroy, and governor-general and the honorific don, and also the tenth part of all riches to be obtained from his intended voyage. The document followed a standard form in 15th-century Castile with specific points arranged in chapters (capítulos).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Isabella I of Castile</span> Queen of Castile (1474 to 1503), Queen consort of Aragon and Servant of God

Isabella I was Queen of Castile from 1474 until her death in 1504, as well as Queen consort of Aragon from 1469 until 1504 by virtue of her marriage to King Ferdinand II of Aragon. Reigning together over a dynastically unified Spain, Isabella and Ferdinand are known as the Catholic Monarchs.

<i>Dudum siquidem</i> Papal bull issued by Pope Alexander VI

Dudum siquidem is a papal bull issued by Pope Alexander VI on 26 September 1493, one of the Bulls of Donation addressed to the Catholic Monarchs Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon which supplemented the bull Inter caetera and purported to grant to them "all islands and mainlands whatsoever, found and to be found, discovered and to be discovered, that are or may be or may seem to be in the route of navigation or travel towards the west or south, whether they be in western parts, or in the regions of the south and east and of India".

References

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