1492

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1492 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1492
MCDXCII
Ab urbe condita 2245
Armenian calendar 941
ԹՎ ՋԽԱ
Assyrian calendar 6242
Balinese saka calendar 1413–1414
Bengali calendar 899
Berber calendar 2442
English Regnal year 7  Hen. 7   8  Hen. 7
Buddhist calendar 2036
Burmese calendar 854
Byzantine calendar 7000–7001
Chinese calendar 辛亥(Metal  Pig)
4188 or 4128
     to 
壬子年 (Water  Rat)
4189 or 4129
Coptic calendar 1208–1209
Discordian calendar 2658
Ethiopian calendar 1484–1485
Hebrew calendar 5252–5253
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1548–1549
 - Shaka Samvat 1413–1414
 - Kali Yuga 4592–4593
Holocene calendar 11492
Igbo calendar 492–493
Iranian calendar 870–871
Islamic calendar 897–898
Japanese calendar Entoku 4 / Meiō 1
(明応元年)
Javanese calendar 1409–1410
Julian calendar 1492
MCDXCII
Korean calendar 3825
Minguo calendar 420 before ROC
民前420年
Nanakshahi calendar 24
Thai solar calendar 2034–2035
Tibetan calendar 阴金猪年
(female Iron-Pig)
1618 or 1237 or 465
     to 
阳水鼠年
(male Water-Rat)
1619 or 1238 or 466

Year 1492 ( MCDXCII ) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar, the 1492nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 492nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 15th century, and the 3rd year of the 1490s decade.

Contents

1492 is considered to be a significant year in the history of the West, Europe, Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Spain, and the New World, among others, because of the number of significant events to have taken place during it. Some of the events which propelled the year into Western consciousness, also listed below, include the completion of the Reconquista of Spain, Europe's discovery of the New World, and the expulsion of Jews from Spain.

Events

January 2 - Muhammad XII, last Moorish Emir of Granada, surrenders his city to the army of Ferdinand and Isabella. La Rendicion de Granada - Pradilla.jpg
January 2 Muhammad XII, last Moorish Emir of Granada, surrenders his city to the army of Ferdinand and Isabella.
October 12 - Columbus reaches the Americas for Spain. Columbus Taking Possession.jpg
October 12 Columbus reaches the Americas for Spain.

Known dates

Unknown dates

Births

Queen Marguerite de Navarre Marguerite d'Angouleme.jpg
Queen Marguerite de Navarre
Duchess Sabina of Bavaria Sabine of Bavaria-Munich.jpg
Duchess Sabina of Bavaria

Deaths

Lorenzo de' Medici Verrocchio Lorenzo de Medici.jpg
Lorenzo de' Medici
King Casimir IV Jagiellon Casimir IV Jagiellon.PNG
King Casimir IV Jagiellon
Pope Innocent VIII Innocent VIII 1492.JPG
Pope Innocent VIII
Saint Beatrice of Silva RostroBeatrizSilva.jpg
Saint Beatrice of Silva

Related Research Articles

1490s decade

The 1490s decade ran from January 1, 1490, to December 31, 1499.

1503 Calendar year

Year 1503 (MDIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1498 (MCDXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1498th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 498th year of the 2nd millennium, the 98th year of the 15th century, and the 9th and pre-final year of the 1490s decade.

Year 1478 (MCDLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1480 (MCDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1493 Calendar year

Year 1493 (MCDXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1504 Calendar year

Year 1504 (MDIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1502 Calendar year

Year 1502 (MDII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1496 (MCDXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Catholic Monarchs of Spain Title for Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon

The term Catholic Monarchs refers to Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon, whose marriage and joint rule marked the de facto unification of Spain. They were both from the House of Trastámara and were second cousins, being both descended from John I of Castile; on marriage they were given a papal dispensation to deal with consanguinity by Sixtus IV. They married on October 19, 1469, in the city of Valladolid; Isabella was eighteen years old and Ferdinand a year younger. It is generally accepted by most scholars that the unification of Spain can essentially be traced back to the marriage of Ferdinand and Isabella. Spain was formed as a dynastic union of two crowns rather than a unitary state, as Castile and Aragon remained separate kingdoms until the Nueva Planta decrees of 1707–1716. The court of Ferdinand and Isabella was constantly on the move, in order to bolster local support for the crown from local feudal lords. The title of "Catholic King and Queen" was officially bestowed on Ferdinand and Isabella by Pope Alexander VI in 1494, in recognition of their defense of the Catholic faith within their realms.

Bartholomew Columbus Italian explorer

Bartholomew Columbus was an Italian explorer from Genoa and the younger brother of Christopher Columbus.

Crown of Castile Former country in the Iberian Peninsula

The Crown of Castile was a medieval polity in the Iberian Peninsula that formed in 1230 as a result of the third and definitive union of the crowns and, some decades later, the parliaments of the kingdoms of Castile and León upon the accession of the then Castilian king, Ferdinand III, to the vacant Leonese throne. It continued to exist as a separate entity after the personal union in 1469 of the crowns of Castile and Aragon with the marriage of the Catholic Monarchs up to the promulgation of the Nueva Planta decrees by Philip V in 1715.

Origin theories of Christopher Columbus history studies about the origins of Christopher Columbus

The exact ethnic or national origin of Christopher Columbus (1451-1506) has been a source of speculation since the 19th century. The general consensus among historians is that Columbus's family was from the coastal region of Liguria, that he spent his boyhood and early youth in the Republic of Genoa, in Genoa, in Vasco Bobeck, and that he subsequently lived in Savona, where his father Domenico moved in 1470. Much of this evidence derives from data concerning Columbus's immediate family connections in Genoa and opinions voiced by contemporaries concerning his Genoese origins, which few dispute.

Voyages of Christopher Columbus 1492-1502 voyages to the Americas; beginning of the Columbian exchange

In 1492, a Spanish-based transatlantic maritime expedition led by Italian explorer Christopher Columbus encountered the Americas, continents which were virtually unknown in Europe, Asia and Africa and were outside the Old World political and economic system. The four voyages of Columbus led to the widespread knowledge that a continent existed west of Europe and east of Asia. This breakthrough in geographical knowledge inaugurated a period of exploration, conquest, colonization, biological exchange, and trans-Atlantic trade, whose effects and consequences persist to the present, and are sometimes cited as the start of the modern era.

<i>Tanto monta, monta tanto, Isabel como Fernando</i>

Tanto monta, monta tanto, Isabel como Fernando or simply Tanto monta, monta tanto was the alleged motto of a prenuptial agreement made by the Spanish Catholic Monarchs, Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon. During their joint reign they did in fact support each other effectively in accordance with their motto of equality. Still, the wording "Tanto monta, monta tanto, Isabel como Fernando" is actually a popular saying invented many centuries later, not the real motto. Besides, and contrary to popular belief, Tanto monta was only the motto of King Ferdinand of Aragon, and never used by Isabella.

Ferdinand II of Aragon 15th and 16th-century King of Aragon, Sicily, Naples, and Valencia

Ferdinand II was King of Aragon from 1479 and, by marriage, King of Castile from 1474, reigning over a dynastically unified Spain jointly with his wife Isabella I. Ferdinand is considered de facto the first King of Spain, being described as such during his own lifetime, altough Castile and Aragon remained de jure two different kingdoms until the Nueva Planta Decrees of 1716.

Granada War Final war of the Reconquista

The Granada War was a series of military campaigns between 1482 and 1491, during the reign of the Catholic Monarchs Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon, against the Nasrid dynasty's Emirate of Granada. It ended with the defeat of Granada and its annexation by Castile, ending all Islamic rule on the Iberian peninsula.

Capitulations of Santa Fe Colon se cayo por el caño de santa fe y se mato

The Capitulations of Santa Fe between Christopher Columbus and the Catholic Monarchs, Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon, were signed in Santa Fe, Granada on April 17, 1492. They granted Columbus the titles of admiral of the Ocean Sea, viceroy, and governor-general and the honorific don, and also the tenth part of all riches to be obtained from his intended voyage. The document followed a standard form in 15th-century Castile with specific points arranged in chapters (capítulos). Although not a formal agreement, the capitulations resulted from negotiation.

Isabella I of Castile 15th and 16th-century Castilian queen

Isabella I was Queen of Castile from 1474 and Queen consort of Aragon from 1479, reigning over a dynastically unified Spain jointly with her husband Ferdinand II. Isabella is considered the first Queen of Spain de facto, being described as such during her own lifetime, although Castile and Aragon de jure remained two different kingdoms until the Nueva Planta Decrees of 1716.

Christopher Columbuss journal literary work

Christopher Columbus's journal (Diario) is a diary and logbook written by Christopher Columbus about his first voyage. The journal covers events from 3 August 1492, when Columbus departed from Palos de la Frontera, to 15 March 1493 and includes a prologue addressing the sovereigns. Several contemporary references confirm Columbus kept a journal of his voyage as a daily record of events and as evidence for the Catholic Monarchs. Upon his return to Spain in the spring of 1493, Columbus presented the journal to Isabella I of Castile. She had it copied, retained the original, and gave the copy to Columbus before his second voyage. The whereabouts of the original Spanish text have been unknown since 1504.

References

  1. "La conquista de Granada por los Reyes Católicos". National Geographic . November 16, 2012. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  2. Brekelmans, Christianus; Saebo, Magne; Sæbø, Magne; Haran, Menahem; Fishbane, Michael A.; Ska, Jean Louis; Machinist, Peter (1996). Hebrew Bible / Old Testament: The History of Its Interpretation: II: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. p. 283. ISBN   9783525539828.
  3. "Turkey Virtual Jewish History Tour". www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org.
  4. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 135–138. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  5. Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History . London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp.  189–192. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  6. Fryde, E. B (July 1, 1984). "Humanism and Renaissance Historiography". A&C Black. p. 122. ISBN   9780826427502.