1554

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1554 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1554
MDLIV
Ab urbe condita 2307
Armenian calendar 1003
ԹՎ ՌԳ
Assyrian calendar 6304
Balinese saka calendar 1475–1476
Bengali calendar 961
Berber calendar 2504
English Regnal year 1  Mar. 1   1  Ph.  &  M.
Buddhist calendar 2098
Burmese calendar 916
Byzantine calendar 7062–7063
Chinese calendar 癸丑(Water  Ox)
4250 or 4190
     to 
甲寅年 (Wood  Tiger)
4251 or 4191
Coptic calendar 1270–1271
Discordian calendar 2720
Ethiopian calendar 1546–1547
Hebrew calendar 5314–5315
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1610–1611
 - Shaka Samvat 1475–1476
 - Kali Yuga 4654–4655
Holocene calendar 11554
Igbo calendar 554–555
Iranian calendar 932–933
Islamic calendar 961–962
Japanese calendar Tenbun 23
(天文23年)
Javanese calendar 1472–1473
Julian calendar 1554
MDLIV
Korean calendar 3887
Minguo calendar 358 before ROC
民前358年
Nanakshahi calendar 86
Thai solar calendar 2096–2097
Tibetan calendar 阴水牛年
(female Water-Ox)
1680 or 1299 or 527
     to 
阳木虎年
(male Wood-Tiger)
1681 or 1300 or 528
April 12: Mary of Guise. Jacob and Marie de Guise.jpg
April 12: Mary of Guise.

Year 1554 ( MDLIV ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

August 2: Battle of Marciano in Tuscany. Scannagallo Vasari.jpg
August 2: Battle of Marciano in Tuscany.

JanuaryJune

January 5 is the fifth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 360 days remaining until the end of the year.

Eindhoven City and municipality in North Brabant, Netherlands

Eindhoven is the fifth-largest city and a municipality of the Netherlands. It had a population of 229,126 in 2018, making it the largest city in the province of North Brabant, although 's-Hertogenbosch is its capital. Eindhoven was originally located at the confluence of the Dommel and Gender.

January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 353 days remaining until the end of the year.

JulyDecember

July 23 is the 204th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 161 days remaining until the end of the year.

July 25 is the 206th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 159 days remaining until the end of the year.

Mary I of England Queen of England and Ireland

Mary I, also known as Mary Tudor, was the Queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 until her death. She is best known for her aggressive attempt to reverse the English Reformation, which had begun during the reign of her father, Henry VIII. The executions that marked her pursuit of the restoration of Roman Catholicism in England and Ireland led to her denunciation as "Bloody Mary" by her Protestant opponents.

Date unknown

Mikael Agricola Finnish clergyman and de facto founder of literary Finnish

Mikael Agricola was a Lutheran clergyman who became the de facto founder of literary Finnish and a prominent proponent of the Protestant Reformation in Sweden, including Finland, which was a Swedish territory at the time. He is often called the "father of literary Finnish".

Turku City in Southwest Finland, Finland

Turku is a city on the southwest coast of Finland at the mouth of the Aura River, in the region of Southwest Finland (Varsinais-Suomi). Turku, as a town, was settled during the 13th century and founded most likely at the end of the 13th century, making it the oldest city in Finland. It quickly became the most important city in Finland, a status it retained for hundreds of years. After Finland became part of the Russian Empire (1809) and the capital of the Grand Duchy of Finland was moved to Helsinki (1812), Turku continued to be the most populous city in Finland until the end of the 1840s, and it remains a regional capital and an important business and cultural center.

Saadi dynasty dynasty

The Saadi dynasty or Saadian dynasty was an Arab Moroccan dynasty, which ruled Morocco from 1549 to 1659.

Births

Philip William, Prince of Orange Michiel Jansz van Mierevelt - Filips Willem prins van Oranje.jpg
Philip William, Prince of Orange
Louis III, Duke of Württemberg Duke of Württemberg

Louis III, Duke of Württemberg, was a German nobleman. He was the fifth ruling Duke of Württemberg, from 1568 until his death.

1593 Year

1593 (MDXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1593rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 593rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 16th century, and the 4th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1593, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

January 9 is the ninth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 356 days remaining until the end of the year.

Deaths

Francisco Vazquez de Coronado Pabellon Consistorial medallon 01 Francisco Vazquez Coronado.JPG
Francisco Vázquez de Coronado

Related Research Articles

1566 Year

Year 1566 (MDLXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1640 Year

1640 (MDCXL) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1640th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 640th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1640, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1636 Year

1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1636th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 636th year of the 2nd millennium, the 36th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1636, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1635 Year

1635 (MDCXXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1635th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 635th year of the 2nd millennium, the 35th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1635, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1537 Year

Year 1537 (MDXXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1536 Year

Year 1536 (MDXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1577 Year

Year 1577 (MDLXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1570 Year

Year 1570 (MDLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1567 Year

Year 1567 (MDLXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1659 Year

1659 (MDCLIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1659th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 659th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1659, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1563 Year

Year 1563 (MDLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1562 Year

Year 1562 (MDLXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1558 Year

Year 1558 (MDLVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1559 Year

Year 1559 (MDLIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1553 Year

Year 1553 (MDLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1552 Year

Year 1552 (MDLII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1547 Year

Year 1547 (MDXLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1548 Year

Year 1548 (MDXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 150–153. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  2. Grun, Bernard (1991). The Timetables of History (3rd ed.). New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 245. ISBN   0-671-74919-6.
  3. Kerr, Robert (1824). A general history and collection of voyages and travels. 7. Edinburgh: Blackwood. p. 229. Retrieved 2011-11-27.