1509

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1509 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1509
MDIX
Ab urbe condita 2262
Armenian calendar 958
ԹՎ ՋԾԸ
Assyrian calendar 6259
Balinese saka calendar 1430–1431
Bengali calendar 916
Berber calendar 2459
English Regnal year 24  Hen. 7   1  Hen. 8
Buddhist calendar 2053
Burmese calendar 871
Byzantine calendar 7017–7018
Chinese calendar 戊辰(Earth  Dragon)
4205 or 4145
     to 
己巳年 (Earth  Snake)
4206 or 4146
Coptic calendar 1225–1226
Discordian calendar 2675
Ethiopian calendar 1501–1502
Hebrew calendar 5269–5270
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1565–1566
 - Shaka Samvat 1430–1431
 - Kali Yuga 4609–4610
Holocene calendar 11509
Igbo calendar 509–510
Iranian calendar 887–888
Islamic calendar 914–915
Japanese calendar Eishō 6
(永正6年)
Javanese calendar 1426–1427
Julian calendar 1509
MDIX
Korean calendar 3842
Minguo calendar 403 before ROC
民前403年
Nanakshahi calendar 41
Thai solar calendar 2051–2052
Tibetan calendar 阳土龙年
(male Earth-Dragon)
1635 or 1254 or 482
     to 
阴土蛇年
(female Earth-Snake)
1636 or 1255 or 483
February 3: Battle of Diu Caravela de armada of Joao Serrao.jpg
February 3: Battle of Diu

Year 1509 ( MDIX ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 331 days remaining until the end of the year.

Battle of Diu (1509) battle between Ottoman and Portuguese in india

The Battle of Diu was a naval battle fought on 3 February 1509 in the Arabian Sea, in the port of Diu, India, between the Portuguese Empire and a joint fleet of the Sultan of Gujarat, the Mamlûk Burji Sultanate of Egypt, the Zamorin of Calicut with support of the Republic of Venice.

Kingdom of Portugal kingdom in Southwestern Europe between 1139 and 1910

The Kingdom of Portugal was a monarchy on the Iberian Peninsula and the predecessor of modern Portugal. It was in existence from 1139 until 1910. After 1415, it was also known as the Kingdom of Portugal and the Algarves, and between 1815 and 1822, it was known as the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves. The name is also often applied to the Portuguese Empire, the realm's extensive overseas colonies.

JulyDecember

July 26 is the 207th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 158 days remaining until the end of the year.

Krishnadevaraya Vijayanagara Emperor

Krishnadevaraya was an emperor of the Vijayanagara Empire who reigned from 1509–1529. He is the third ruler of the Tuluva Dynasty. Presiding over the empire at its zenith, he is regarded as an icon by many Indians. Krishna Deva Raya earned the titles Kannada Rajya Rama Ramana, Andhra Bhoja and Mooru Rayara Ganda. He became the dominant ruler of the peninsula of India by defeating the Sultans of Bijapur, Golconda, the Bahmani Sultanate and the Gajapatis of Odisha, and was one of the most powerful Hindu rulers in India. Indeed, when the Mughal Emperor Babur was taking stock of the potentates of north India, Krishnadevaraya was rated the most powerful and had the most extensive empire in the subcontinent.

Vijayanagara Empire Hindu kingdom in Southern India (14th–17th century)

The Vijayanagara Empire was based in the Deccan Plateau region in South India. It was established in 1336 by Harihara I and his brother Bukka Raya I of Sangama Dynasty. The empire rose to prominence as a culmination of attempts by the southern powers to ward off Islamic invasions by the end of the 13th century. It lasted until 1646, although its power declined after a major military defeat in the Battle of Talikota in 1565 by the combined armies of the Deccan sultanates. The empire is named after its capital city of Vijayanagara, whose ruins surround present day Hampi, now a World Heritage Site in Karnataka, India. The writings of medieval European travelers such as Domingo Paes, Fernão Nunes, and Niccolò Da Conti, and the literature in local languages provide crucial information about its history. Archaeological excavations at Vijayanagara have revealed the empire's power and wealth.

Date unknown

Erasmus Dutch Renaissance humanist, Catholic priest, and theologian

Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus, known as Erasmus or Erasmus of Rotterdam, was a Dutch Christian humanist who was the greatest scholar of the northern Renaissance. Originally trained as a Catholic priest, Erasmus was an important figure in classical scholarship who wrote in a pure Latin style. Among humanists he enjoyed the sobriquet "Prince of the Humanists", and has been called "the crowning glory of the Christian humanists". Using humanist techniques for working on texts, he prepared important new Latin and Greek editions of the New Testament, which raised questions that would be influential in the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation. He also wrote On Free Will,In Praise of Folly, Handbook of a Christian Knight, On Civility in Children, Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style, Julius Exclusus, and many other works.

<i>In Praise of Folly</i> book

In Praise of Folly, also translated as The Praise of Folly, is an essay written in Latin in 1509 by Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam and first printed in June 1511. Inspired by previous works of the Italian humanist Faustino Perisauli De Triumpho Stultitiae, it is a satirical attack on superstitions and other traditions of European society as well as on the Western Church.

St Pauls School, London boys independent school in Richmond upon Thames, England

St Paul's School is a selective independent school for boys aged 13–18, founded in 1509 by John Colet and located on a 43-acre (180,000m2) site by the River Thames, in Barnes, London.

Births

John of Leiden Jan van Leiden by Aldegrever.jpg
John of Leiden

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Guillaume Le Testu, sometimes referred to as Guillaume Le Têtu, was a French privateer, explorer and navigator. He was one of the foremost cartographers of his time and an author of the Dieppe maps. His maps were distinguished by their sophistication and detail; they influenced generations of cartographers, navigators and explorers.

1573 Year

Year 1573 (MDLXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Henry VII of England Enrique VII de Inglaterra, por un artista anonimo.jpg
Henry VII of England
Joao da Nova Joao da Nova.jpg
Joao da Nova

Related Research Articles

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1500 Year

Year 1500 (MD) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1540 Year

Year 1540 (MDXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1537 Year

Year 1537 (MDXXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1534 Year

Year 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1536 Year

Year 1536 (MDXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1523 Year

Year 1523 (MDXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1539 Year

Year 1539 (MDXXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1533 Year

Year 1533 (MDXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1529 Year

Year 1529 (MDXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1527 Year

Year 1527 (MDXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1511 Year

Year 1511 (MDXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1510 Year

Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1502 Year

Year 1502 (MDII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1501 Year

Year 1501 (MDI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1474 (MCDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1443 (MCDXLIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

The Royal Almonry is a small office within the Royal Households of the United Kingdom, headed by the Lord High Almoner, an office dating from 1103. The almoner is responsible for distributing alms to the poor.

References

  1. Cheney, C. R.; Cheney, Christopher Robert; Jones, Michael (2000). A Handbook of Dates: For Students of British History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 37–38. ISBN   9780521778459.
  2. "On April 27, 1509, Pope Julius II excommunicated the..." tribunedigital-chicagotribune. Retrieved 19 June 2018.