1559

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
April 3- The Peace of Cateau Cambresis is concluded Cateau-Cambresis.jpg
April 3 The Peace of Cateau Cambrésis is concluded
1559 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1559
MDLIX
Ab urbe condita 2312
Armenian calendar 1008
ԹՎ ՌԸ
Assyrian calendar 6309
Balinese saka calendar 1480–1481
Bengali calendar 966
Berber calendar 2509
English Regnal year 1  Eliz. 1   2  Eliz. 1
Buddhist calendar 2103
Burmese calendar 921
Byzantine calendar 7067–7068
Chinese calendar 戊午年 (Earth  Horse)
4256 or 4049
     to 
己未年 (Earth  Goat)
4257 or 4050
Coptic calendar 1275–1276
Discordian calendar 2725
Ethiopian calendar 1551–1552
Hebrew calendar 5319–5320
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1615–1616
 - Shaka Samvat 1480–1481
 - Kali Yuga 4659–4660
Holocene calendar 11559
Igbo calendar 559–560
Iranian calendar 937–938
Islamic calendar 966–967
Japanese calendar Eiroku 2
(永禄2年)
Javanese calendar 1478–1479
Julian calendar 1559
MDLIX
Korean calendar 3892
Minguo calendar 353 before ROC
民前353年
Nanakshahi calendar 91
Thai solar calendar 2101–2102
Tibetan calendar 阳土马年
(male Earth-Horse)
1685 or 1304 or 532
     to 
阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1686 or 1305 or 533

Year 1559 ( MDLIX ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events


JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

The fatal tournament between King Henry and Lord Montgomery Tournament between Henry II and Lorges.jpg
The fatal tournament between King Henry and Lord Montgomery

JulySeptember

[9]

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

Emperor Nurhaci born on February 19 Nurhaci.jpg
Emperor Nurhaci born on February 19
Lawrence of Brindisi born on July 22 San Lorenzo da Brindisi.jpg
Lawrence of Brindisi born on July 22
Jacques Sirmond born on October 12 Sirmond, Jacques.jpg
Jacques Sirmond born on October 12

Deaths

King Christian III of Denmark and Norway died on New Year's Day, January 1, 1559 Christian III of Denmark.jpg
King Christian III of Denmark and Norway died on New Year's Day, January 1, 1559
King Christian II of Denmark, Norway and Sweden died on January 25, 1559 ChristianII of denmark.jpg
King Christian II of Denmark, Norway and Sweden died on January 25, 1559
King Henry II of France died on July 10, 1559 Henry II of France..jpg
King Henry II of France died on July 10, 1559
Pope Paul IV died on August 18, 1559 Pope Paul IV - Jacopino Conte (Manner), ca. 1560.jpg
Pope Paul IV died on August 18, 1559

Related Research Articles

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The 1490s decade ran from January 1, 1490, to December 31, 1499.

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1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1620s</span> Decade

The 1620s decade ran from January 1, 1620, to December 31, 1629.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">1605</span> Calendar year

1605 (MDCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1605th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 605th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1605, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1621</span> Calendar year

1621 (MDCXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1621st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 621st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1621, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The 1480s decade ran from January 1, 1480, to December 31, 1489.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1500s (decade)</span> Decade

The 1500s ran from January 1, 1500, to December 31, 1509.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1585</span> Calendar year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1585th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 585th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1483 (MCDLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1555</span> Calendar year

Year 1555 (MDLV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1550s</span> Decade

The 1550s decade ran from January 1, 1550, to December 31, 1559.

The 1590s decade ran from January 1, 1590, to December 31, 1599.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1590</span> Calendar year

1590 (MDXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1590th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 590th year of the 2nd millennium, the 90th year of the 16th century, and the 1st year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1590, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1539</span> Calendar year

Year 1539 (MDXXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1508</span> Calendar year

Year 1508 (MDVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1502 (MDII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

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Early modern Europe, also referred to as the post-medieval period, is the period of European history between the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, roughly the late 15th century to the late 18th century. Historians variously mark the beginning of the early modern period with the invention of moveable type printing in the 1450s, the Fall of Constantinople and end of the Hundred Years' War in 1453, the end of the Wars of the Roses in 1485, the beginning of the High Renaissance in Italy in the 1490s, the end of the Reconquista and subsequent voyages of Christopher Columbus to the Americas in 1492, or the start of the Protestant Reformation in 1517. The precise dates of its end point also vary and are usually linked with either the start of the French Revolution in 1789 or with the more vaguely defined beginning of the Industrial Revolution in late 18th century England.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Italian War of 1551–1559</span> Tenth phase of the Italian Wars (1551-1559)

The Italian War of 1551–1559 began when Henry II of France declared war against Holy Roman Emperor Charles V with the intent of recapturing parts of Italy and ensuring French, rather than Habsburg, domination of European affairs. The war ended following the signing of the Treaty of Cateau-Cambrésis between the monarchs of Spain, England and France in 1559. Historians have emphasized the importance of gunpowder technology, new styles of fortification to resist cannon fire, and the increased professionalization of the soldiers.

The Reformation in Ireland was a movement for the reform of religious life and institutions that was introduced into Ireland by the English administration at the behest of King Henry VIII of England. His desire for an annulment of his marriage was known as the King's Great Matter. Ultimately Pope Clement VII refused the petition; consequently, in order to give legal effect to his wishes, it became necessary for the King to assert his lordship over the Catholic Church in his realm. In passing the Acts of Supremacy in 1534, the English Parliament confirmed the King's supremacy over the Church in the Kingdom of England. This challenge to Papal supremacy resulted in a breach with the Catholic Church. By 1541, the Irish Parliament had agreed to the change in status of the country from that of a Lordship to that of Kingdom of Ireland.

References

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  8. Escallier, Énée Aimé (1852). L'abbaye d'Anchin, 1079-1792 (in French). L. Lefort.
  9. 1 2 3 "Conclave of September 5 to December 25, 1559", The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church, by Salvador Miranda.
  10. Guy, John, My Heart is my Own, London, Fourth Estate, 2004, ISBN   1841157538
  11. Calendar State Papers Scotland, vol. 1 (Edinburgh, 1898), pp. 260-1, 262: Aeneas James George Mackay, Chroniclis of Scotland, vol. 2 (Edinburgh, 1899), p. 163
  12. Svat Soucek (2008):"The Portuguese and Turks in the Persian Gulf", in Revisiting Hormuz: Portuguese Interactions in the Persian Gulf Region in the Early Modern Period, p.37 copies archived on January 2, 2021 on the Wayback Machine website
  13. Mark Pattison (1875). Isaac Casaubon, 1559-1614. Longmans, Green. p. 11.
  14. John Calvin : for a new reformation. Derek Thomas. Wheaton, Illinois. 2019. ISBN   978-1-4335-1281-0. OCLC   1091236732.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link) CS1 maint: others (link)
  15. Austin, Gregory. "Chronology of Psychoactive Substance Use". Drugs & Society. Comitas Institute for Anthropological Study. Archived from the original on October 12, 2011. Retrieved October 7, 2011.
  16. G.R. Elton, ed. The New Cambridge Modern History, Vol. 2: The Reformation, 1520–1559 (1st ed. 1958)
  17. Lewis Spitz, The Protestant Reformation: 1517–1559 (2003).
  18. Robert Tudur Jones. "Penry, John (1563-1593), Puritan author". Welsh Biography Online. Retrieved May 26, 2021.
  19. Alexander Hopkins McDannald (1945). The Encyclopedia Americana. Americana Corporation. p. 599.
  20. "Paul IV | pope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved July 13, 2021.