1476

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A painting of Vlad the Impaler, who was killed on the march to Bucharest, probably before the end of December. Vlad Tepes 002.jpg
A painting of Vlad the Impaler, who was killed on the march to Bucharest, probably before the end of December.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1476 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1476
MCDLXXVI
Ab urbe condita 2229
Armenian calendar 925
ԹՎ ՋԻԵ
Assyrian calendar 6226
Balinese saka calendar 1397–1398
Bengali calendar 883
Berber calendar 2426
English Regnal year 15  Edw. 4   16  Edw. 4
Buddhist calendar 2020
Burmese calendar 838
Byzantine calendar 6984–6985
Chinese calendar 乙未(Wood  Goat)
4172 or 4112
     to 
丙申年 (Fire  Monkey)
4173 or 4113
Coptic calendar 1192–1193
Discordian calendar 2642
Ethiopian calendar 1468–1469
Hebrew calendar 5236–5237
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1532–1533
 - Shaka Samvat 1397–1398
 - Kali Yuga 4576–4577
Holocene calendar 11476
Igbo calendar 476–477
Iranian calendar 854–855
Islamic calendar 880–881
Japanese calendar Bunmei 8
(文明8年)
Javanese calendar 1392–1393
Julian calendar 1476
MCDLXXVI
Korean calendar 3809
Minguo calendar 436 before ROC
民前436年
Nanakshahi calendar 8
Thai solar calendar 2018–2019
Tibetan calendar 阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
1602 or 1221 or 449
     to 
阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1603 or 1222 or 450

Year 1476 ( MCDLXXVI ) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Monday is any year with 366 days that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are GF, such as the years 1912, 1940, 1968, 1996, 2024, 2052, 2080, and 2120 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2008, 2036, and 2064 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Common years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 305 days remain until the end of the year.

Battle of Toro Battle during the war of the Castillian Succession

The Battle of Toro was a royal battle from the War of the Castilian Succession, fought on 1 March 1476, near the city of Toro, between the Castilian troops of the Catholic Monarchs and the Portuguese-Castilian forces of Afonso V and Prince John.

War of the Castilian Succession military conflict contested from 1475 to 1479

The War of the Castilian Succession, more accurately referred to as "Second War of Castilian Succession" or simply "War of Henry IV's Succession" to avoid confusion with other Castilian succession wars, was the military conflict contested from 1475 to 1479 for the succession of the Crown of Castile fought between the supporters of Joanna 'la Beltraneja', reputed daughter of the late monarch Henry IV of Castile, and those of Henry's half-sister, Isabella, who was ultimately successful.

Date Unknown

Leonardo da Vinci Italian Renaissance polymath

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci, more commonly Leonardo da Vinci or simply Leonardo, was an Italian polymath of the Renaissance whose areas of interest included invention, drawing, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography. He has been variously called the father of palaeontology, ichnology, and architecture, and he is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time. Sometimes credited with the inventions of the parachute, helicopter, and tank, he epitomised the Renaissance humanist ideal.

Axayacatl 6th tlatoani of Tenochtitlan and ruler of the Aztec Triple Alliance

Axayacatl was the sixth tlatoani of the altepetl of Tenochtitlan and ruler of the Aztec Triple Alliance.

Tlatoani is the Classical Nahuatl term for the ruler of an āltepētl, a pre-Hispanic state. It may be translated into English as "king". A cihuātlahtoāni is a female ruler, or queen regnant.

Births

January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 351 days remain until the end of the year.

Anne St Leger was a niece of two Kings of England, Edward IV and Richard III. Before she was 8, she had inherited a vast fortune and been disinherited of it. Married at 14, she had 11 children, and is a link in the maternal line that was used to identify the remains of Richard III.

1526 Year

Year 1526 (MDXXVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

John de Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk English nobleman

John de Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk, KG, known as 1st Earl of Surrey between 1451 and 1461, was the only son of John de Mowbray, 3rd Duke of Norfolk and Eleanor Bourchier. His maternal grandparents were William Bourchier, Count of Eu and Anne of Gloucester.

Year 1444 (MCDXLIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once.

Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter Elder sister of King Edward IV of England

Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter, aka Anne Plantagenet, was the first child of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, and Cecily Neville. She was thus the eldest sister of kings Edward IV (1461–1483) and Richard III (1483–1485); and of Edmund, Earl of Rutland, Elizabeth of York, Duchess of Suffolk, Margaret, Duchess of Burgundy and of George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence.

Related Research Articles

Year 1481 (MCDLXXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar).

The 1470s decade ran from January 1, 1470, to December 31, 1479.

The 1450s decade ran from January 1, 1450, to December 31, 1459.

1415 Year

Year 1415 (MCDXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1431 (MCDXXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1462 (MCDLXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1475 (MCDLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1456 (MCDLVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1455 (MCDLV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1424 (MCDXXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1432 (MCDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Radu cel Frumos Son of Vlad II Dracul

Radu III the Fair, Radu III the Handsome or Radu III the Beautiful, also known by his Turkish name Radu Bey (1437/1439—1475), was the younger brother of Vlad III and voivode of the principality of Wallachia. They were both sons of Vlad II Dracul and his wife, Princess Cneajna of Moldavia. In addition to Vlad III, Radu also had two older siblings, Mircea II and Vlad Călugărul, both of whom would also briefly rule Wallachia.

Vlad II Dracul Duke of Wallachia

Vlad II, also known as Vlad Dracul or Vlad the Dragon, was Voivode of Wallachia from 1436 to 1442, and again from 1443 to 1447. Born an illegitimate son of Mircea I of Wallachia, he spent his youth at the court of Sigismund of Luxembourg, who made him a member of the Order of the Dragon in 1431. Sigismund also recognized him as the lawful voivode of Wallachia, allowing him to settle in the nearby Transylvania. Vlad could not assert his claim during the life of his half-brother, Alexander I Aldea, who acknowledged the suzerainty of the Ottoman Sultan, Murad II.

Vlad the Impaler Prince of Wallachia (d. 1476 to 1477)

Vlad III, known as Vlad the Impaler or Vlad Dracula, was voivode of Wallachia three times between 1448 and his death. He is often considered one of the most important rulers Wallachia had and a national hero of Romania.

Mircea II (1428–1447) was a onetime Voivode of the principality of Wallachia, in the year 1442. He was the oldest son of Vlad II Dracul and brother of Vlad Țepeș and Radu the Handsome. He was the grandson of his namesake Mircea cel Bătrân.

Ottoman–Hungarian wars war

The Ottoman–Hungarian Wars were a series of battles between the Ottoman Empire and the medieval Kingdom of Hungary. Following the Byzantine Civil War, the Ottoman capture of Gallipoli, and the decisive Battle of Kosovo, the Ottoman Empire was poised to conquer the entirety of the Balkans and also sought and expressed desire to expand further north into Central Europe beginning with the Hungarian lands.

Radu of Afumați Ruler of Wallachia

Radu of Afumați was Voivode (Prince) of Wallachia between January 1522 and April 1529. He began his reign with a victory against Mehmed-bey, a pretender to Wallachia's throne. From 1522 to 1525 he battled the Turks, who supported Vladislav al III-lea and Radu Bădica, both claimants of the throne. The inscription on his tombstone lists 20 battles. He was killed by decapitation on 2 January 1529 near Râmnicu Vâlcea, at Cetățuia Church. He was later buried in the Curtea de Argeș Cathedral.

References

  1. "বাংলাদেশের কয়েকটি প্রাচীন মসজিদ". Inqilab Enterprise & Publications Ltd. August 25, 2015. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015.
  2. Faris, David (1996). Plantagenet ancestry of seventeenth-century colonists: the descent from the later Plantagenet kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, of emigrants from England and Wales to the North American colonies before 1701. Genealogical Pub Co. p. 324. ISBN   9780806315188.
  3. Cohn-Sherbok, Lavinia (September 2, 2003). Who's Who in Christianity. Routledge. p. 235. ISBN   9781134509560.
  4. The Lambeth Review: A Quarterly Magazine of Theology, Christian Politics, Literature, and Art. 1. London: R. J. Mitchell and Sons. March 1872.
  5. Brinton, Selwyn (1909). The Renaissance in Italian Art: A Series in Nine Parts. 5. G. Bell & Sons. p. 16.