1476

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A painting of Vlad the Impaler, who was killed on the march to Bucharest, probably before the end of December. Vlad Tepes 002.jpg
A painting of Vlad the Impaler, who was killed on the march to Bucharest, probably before the end of December.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1476 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1476
MCDLXXVI
Ab urbe condita 2229
Armenian calendar 925
ԹՎ ՋԻԵ
Assyrian calendar 6226
Balinese saka calendar 1397–1398
Bengali calendar 883
Berber calendar 2426
English Regnal year 15  Edw. 4   16  Edw. 4
Buddhist calendar 2020
Burmese calendar 838
Byzantine calendar 6984–6985
Chinese calendar 乙未(Wood  Goat)
4172 or 4112
     to 
丙申年 (Fire  Monkey)
4173 or 4113
Coptic calendar 1192–1193
Discordian calendar 2642
Ethiopian calendar 1468–1469
Hebrew calendar 5236–5237
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1532–1533
 - Shaka Samvat 1397–1398
 - Kali Yuga 4576–4577
Holocene calendar 11476
Igbo calendar 476–477
Iranian calendar 854–855
Islamic calendar 880–881
Japanese calendar Bunmei 8
(文明8年)
Javanese calendar 1392–1393
Julian calendar 1476
MCDLXXVI
Korean calendar 3809
Minguo calendar 436 before ROC
民前436年
Nanakshahi calendar 8
Thai solar calendar 2018–2019
Tibetan calendar 阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
1602 or 1221 or 449
     to 
阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1603 or 1222 or 450

Year 1476 ( MCDLXXVI ) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

Date Unknown

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

Year 1436 (MCDXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1481 (MCDLXXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar).

1450s decade

The 1450s decade ran from January 1, 1450, to December 31, 1459.

Year 1431 (MCDXXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1462 (MCDLXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1475 (MCDLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1456 (MCDLVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1455 (MCDLV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1424 (MCDXXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1432 (MCDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1444 (MCDXLIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once (1000 + + + = 1444.

Radu cel Frumos Voivode of Wallachia, Beylerbeyi and Pasha of Wallachia

Radu III the Fair, Radu III the Handsome or Radu III the Beautiful, also known by his Turkish name Radu Bey, was the younger brother of Vlad III and voivode of the principality of Wallachia. They were both sons of Vlad II Dracul and his wife, Princess Cneajna of Moldavia. In addition to Vlad III, Radu also had two older siblings, Mircea II and Vlad Călugărul, both of whom would also briefly rule Wallachia.

Vlad II Dracul Voivode of Wallachia

Vlad II, also known as Vlad Dracul or Vlad the Dragon, was Voivode of Wallachia from 1436 to 1442, and again from 1443 to 1447. He is internationally known as the father of Vlad the Impaler, or Dracula. Born an illegitimate son of Mircea I of Wallachia, he spent his youth at the court of Sigismund of Luxembourg, who made him a member of the Order of the Dragon in 1431. Sigismund also recognized him as the lawful voivode of Wallachia, allowing him to settle in the nearby Transylvania. Vlad could not assert his claim during the life of his half-brother, Alexander I Aldea, who acknowledged the suzerainty of the Ottoman Sultan, Murad II.

Vlad the Impaler Prince of Wallachia

Vlad III, known as Vlad the Impaler or Vlad Dracula, was Voivode of Wallachia three times between 1448 and his death. He is often considered one of the most important rulers in Wallachian history and a national hero of Romania.

Mircea II (1428–1447) was a onetime Voivode of the principality of Wallachia, in the year 1442. He was the oldest son of Vlad II Dracul and brother of Vlad Țepeș and Radu the Handsome. He was the grandson of his namesake Mircea cel Bătrân.

Basarab IV cel Tânăr, also known as Țepeluș, son of Basarab II, and grandson of Dan II (1422-1431) was 4 times the voivode of the principality of Wallachia between 1474 & 1482:

Night Attack at Târgoviște Battle fought between forces of Vlad III the Impaler of Wallachia and Mehmed II of the Ottoman Empire

The Night Attack at Târgoviște was a battle fought between forces of Vlad III Basarab the Impaler Prince of Wallachia and Mehmed II of the Ottoman Empire on Thursday, June 17, 1462.

Ottoman–Hungarian wars war

The Ottoman–Hungarian Wars were a series of battles between the Ottoman Empire and the medieval Kingdom of Hungary. Following the Byzantine Civil War, the Ottoman capture of Gallipoli, and the decisive Battle of Kosovo, the Ottoman Empire was poised to conquer the entirety of the Balkans and also sought and expressed desire to expand further north into Central Europe beginning with the Hungarian lands.

References

  1. "বাংলাদেশের কয়েকটি প্রাচীন মসজিদ". Inqilab Enterprise & Publications Ltd. August 25, 2015. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015.
  2. Faris, David (1996). Plantagenet ancestry of seventeenth-century colonists: the descent from the later Plantagenet kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, of emigrants from England and Wales to the North American colonies before 1701. Genealogical Pub Co. p. 324. ISBN   9780806315188.
  3. Cohn-Sherbok, Lavinia (September 2, 2003). Who's Who in Christianity. Routledge. p. 235. ISBN   9781134509560.
  4. The Lambeth Review: A Quarterly Magazine of Theology, Christian Politics, Literature, and Art. 1. London: R. J. Mitchell and Sons. March 1872.
  5. Brinton, Selwyn (1909). The Renaissance in Italian Art: A Series in Nine Parts. 5. G. Bell & Sons. p. 16.