1534

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1534 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1534
MDXXXIV
Ab urbe condita 2287
Armenian calendar 983
ԹՎ ՋՁԳ
Assyrian calendar 6284
Balinese saka calendar 1455–1456
Bengali calendar 941
Berber calendar 2484
English Regnal year 25  Hen. 8   26  Hen. 8
Buddhist calendar 2078
Burmese calendar 896
Byzantine calendar 7042–7043
Chinese calendar 癸巳(Water  Snake)
4230 or 4170
     to 
甲午年 (Wood  Horse)
4231 or 4171
Coptic calendar 1250–1251
Discordian calendar 2700
Ethiopian calendar 1526–1527
Hebrew calendar 5294–5295
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1590–1591
 - Shaka Samvat 1455–1456
 - Kali Yuga 4634–4635
Holocene calendar 11534
Igbo calendar 534–535
Iranian calendar 912–913
Islamic calendar 940–941
Japanese calendar Tenbun 3
(天文3年)
Javanese calendar 1452–1453
Julian calendar 1534
MDXXXIV
Korean calendar 3867
Minguo calendar 378 before ROC
民前378年
Nanakshahi calendar 66
Thai solar calendar 2076–2077
Tibetan calendar 阴水蛇年
(female Water-Snake)
1660 or 1279 or 507
     to 
阳木马年
(male Wood-Horse)
1661 or 1280 or 508
The Church of England separates. Canterbury-Cathedral-Church-of-England-1890-1900.jpg
The Church of England separates.

Year 1534 ( MDXXXIV ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

Martin Luther's 1534 Bible. Lutherbibel.jpg
Martin Luther's 1534 Bible.

JanuaryJune

January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 350 days remain until the end of the year.

Parliament of England historic legislature of the Kingdom of England

The Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it united with the Parliament of Scotland to become the Parliament of Great Britain after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Act Respecting the Oath to the Succession

The Act Respecting the Oath to the Succession was passed by the Parliament of England in November 1534, and required all subjects to take an oath to uphold the Act of Succession passed that March. It was later given the formal short title of the Succession to the Crown Act 1534.

JulyDecember

July 4 is the 185th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 180 days remain until the end of the year. The Aphelion, the point in the year when the Earth is farthest from the Sun, occurs around this date.

Election of Christian III

The election of Christian III as king of Denmark and Norway on 4 July 1534 was a landmark event for all of Denmark and Norway. It took place in St. Søren's Church in the town of Rye in eastern Jutland, where the Jutlandic nobility elected Prince Christian, son of King Frederick I and Duke of Schleswig and Holsten, as king. This brought about the Count's Feud and later also led to the implementation of the Protestant Reformation in Denmark and Norway.

Monarchy of Norway head of state of Norway

The Norwegian monarch is the monarchical head of state of Norway, which is a constitutional and hereditary monarchy with a parliamentary system. The Norwegian monarchy can trace its line back to the reign of Harald Fairhair and the previous petty kingdoms which were united to form Norway; it has been in unions with both Sweden and Denmark for long periods.

Date unknown

The Submission of the Clergy was a process by which the Catholic Church in England gave up their power to formulate church laws without the King's licence and assent. It was passed first by the Convocation of Canterbury in 1532 and then by the Reformation Parliament in 1534. Along with other Acts passed by the Parliament, it further separated the Church from Rome.

Manco Inca Yupanqui 16th-century Inca emperor

Manco Inca Yupanqui was the founder and monarch of the independent Neo-Inca State in Vilcabamba, although he was originally a puppet Inca Emperor installed by the Spaniards. He was also known as "Manco II" and "Manco Cápac II". He was one of the sons of Huayna Capac and a younger brother of Huascar.

Sapa Inca Emperor of the Inca Empire (Tawantinsuyu)

The Sapa Inca, Sapan Inka or Sapa Inka, also known as Apu ("divinity"), Inka Qhapaq, or simply Sapa, was the ruler of the Kingdom of Cuzco and, later, the Emperor of the Inca Empire (Tawantinsuyu) and the Neo-Inca State. While the origins of the position are mythical and originate from the legendary foundation of the city of Cusco, historically it seems to have come into being around 1100 CE. Although the Inca believed the Sapa to be the son of Inti and often referred to him as Intip Churin or ‘Son of the Sun,’ the position eventually became hereditary, with son succeeding father. The principal wife of the Inca was known as the Coya or Qoya. The Sapa Inca was at the top of the social hierarchy, and plays a dominant role in the political and spiritual realm.

Births

Archduchess Eleanor of Austria Anonym Erzherzogin Eleonore.jpg
Archduchess Eleanor of Austria

January 6 is the sixth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 359 days remain until the end of the year.

Paul Skalich Renaissance humanist and encyclopedist from Croatia

Paul Skalich (1534–1573), also known as Stanislav Pavao Skalić or Paulus Scalichius de Lika, was an encyclopedist, Renaissance humanist, and adventurer born in Zagreb, Croatia, and who lived part of his life in Germany. His surname is rendered in various other ways: e.g., in English, Skalich, Scalich, Scaliger; in Latin, Scalichius or Scaligius; and in Spanish, Scalitzius.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Pope Clement VII El papa Clemente VII, por Sebastiano del Piombo.jpg
Pope Clement VII

Related Research Articles

1572 Year

Year 1572 (MDLXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1535 Year

Year 1535 (MDXXXV) was not a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1546 Year

Year 1546 (MDXLVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1561 (MDLXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1585 Year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1585th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 585th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1536 Year

Year 1536 (MDXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1530s decade

The 1530s decade ran from January 1, 1530, to December 31, 1539.

1523 Year

Year 1523 (MDXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1050 Year

Year 1050 (ML) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1693 Year

1693 (MDCXCIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1693rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 693rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1693, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1563 Year

Year 1563 (MDLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1559 Year

Year 1559 (MDLIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1547 Year

Year 1547 (MDXLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1533 Year

Year 1533 (MDXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1529 Year

Year 1529 (MDXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1527 Year

Year 1527 (MDXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1513 Year

Year 1513 (MDXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1509 Year

Year 1509 (MDIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. 1 2 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 210–215. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  2. Collins, W. E. (1903). "The Scandinavian North". In Ward, A. W.; Prothero, G. W.; Leathes, Stanley (eds.). The Cambridge Modern History . Cambridge University Press. pp. 599–638.
  3. Pollard, A. F. (1903). "The conflict of creeds and parties in Germany". In Ward, A. W.; Prothero, G. W.; Leathes, Stanley (eds.). The Cambridge Modern History. Cambridge University Press. pp. 206–245.
  4. "One Thousand Years of the Polish Jewish Experience" (PDF). Taube Foundation for Jewish Life and Culture. p. 2. Retrieved December 9, 2011.
  5. "Clement VII | pope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved May 6, 2019.