1477

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1477 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1477
MCDLXXVII
Ab urbe condita 2230
Armenian calendar 926
ԹՎ ՋԻԶ
Assyrian calendar 6227
Balinese saka calendar 1398–1399
Bengali calendar 884
Berber calendar 2427
English Regnal year 16  Edw. 4   17  Edw. 4
Buddhist calendar 2021
Burmese calendar 839
Byzantine calendar 6985–6986
Chinese calendar 丙申(Fire  Monkey)
4173 or 4113
     to 
丁酉年 (Fire  Rooster)
4174 or 4114
Coptic calendar 1193–1194
Discordian calendar 2643
Ethiopian calendar 1469–1470
Hebrew calendar 5237–5238
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1533–1534
 - Shaka Samvat 1398–1399
 - Kali Yuga 4577–4578
Holocene calendar 11477
Igbo calendar 477–478
Iranian calendar 855–856
Islamic calendar 881–882
Japanese calendar Bunmei 9
(文明9年)
Javanese calendar 1393–1394
Julian calendar 1477
MCDLXXVII
Korean calendar 3810
Minguo calendar 435 before ROC
民前435年
Nanakshahi calendar 9
Thai solar calendar 2019–2020
Tibetan calendar 阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1603 or 1222 or 450
     to 
阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1604 or 1223 or 451
The situation of 1477, with Calais, the English Pale and neighboring counties. VlaanderenArtesie1477.png
The situation of 1477, with Calais, the English Pale and neighboring counties.

Year 1477 ( MCDLXXVII ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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Related Research Articles

1490s

The 1490s decade ran from January 1, 1490, to December 31, 1499.

The 1540s decade ran from 1 January 1540, to 31 December 1549.

1595 (MDXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1595, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

The 1460s decade ran from January 1, 1460, to December 31, 1469.

1470s

The 1470s decade ran from January 1, 1470, to December 31, 1479.

The 1480s decade ran from January 1, 1480, to December 31, 1489.

1523 Calendar year

Year 1523 (MDXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1590s decade ran from January 1, 1590, to December 31, 1599.

1590 Calendar year

1590 (MDXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1590, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1547 Calendar year

Year 1547 (MDXLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1499 (MCDXCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1490 (MCDXC) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1470 Calendar year

Year 1470 (MCDLXX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1467 Calendar year

Year 1467 (MCDLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Philip the Bold Duke of Burgundy

Philip II the Bold was Duke of Burgundy and jure uxoris Count of Flanders, Artois and Burgundy. He was the fourth and youngest son of King John II of France and Bonne of Luxembourg.

Charles the Bold 15th-century Duke of Burgundy

Charles, nicknamed the Bold, was the Duke of Burgundy from 1467 to 1477.

Mary of Burgundy 15th-century Duchess of Burgundy

Mary, titular Duchess of Burgundy, reigned over the Burgundian State, now mainly in France—with the exception of the Duchy of Burgundy returned to the Kingdom of France (1477)—and the Low Countries, from 1477 until her death in a riding accident at the age of 25.

Philip the Good 15th-century Duke of Burgundy

Philip the Good was Duke of Burgundy from 1419 until his death. He was a member of a cadet line of the Valois dynasty, to which all 15th-century kings of France belonged. During his reign, the Burgundian State reached the apex of its prosperity and prestige, and became a leading centre of the arts. Philip is known in history for his administrative reforms, his patronage of Flemish artists such as van Eyck and Franco-Flemish composers such as Guillaume Du Fay, and the capture of Joan of Arc. In political affairs, he alternated between alliances with the English and the French in an attempt to improve his dynasty's powerbase. Additionally, as ruler of Flanders, Brabant, Limburg, Artois, Hainaut, Holland, Luxembourg, Zeeland, Friesland and Namur, he played an important role in the history of the Low Countries.

Burgundian Netherlands The Netherlands from 1384 to 1482

In the history of the Low Countries, the Burgundian Netherlands were a number of Imperial and French fiefs ruled in personal union by the House of Valois-Burgundy in the period from 1384 to 1482 and later their Habsburg heirs. They constituted the Northern part of the Burgundian State. The area comprised the major parts of present-day Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg and Hauts-de-France.

Burgundian State Historical government in what is now France, Belgium and the Netherlands

The Burgundian State is a concept coined by historians to describe the vast complex of territories that is also referred to as Valois Burgundy.

References

  1. 1 2 Aleksandr Mikhaĭlovich Prokhorov (1973). Great Soviet Encyclopedia. Macmillan. p. 226.
  2. Sten Lindroth (1976). A History of Uppsala University 1477-1977. Almqvist & Wiksell international. p. 6. ISBN   978-91-506-0081-0.
  3. Heimann, Heinz-Dieter (2001). Die Habsburger: Dynastie und Kaiserreiche. pp. 38–45. ISBN   3-406-44754-6.
  4. Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  5. Kathleen Wellman (May 21, 2013). Queens and Mistresses of Renaissance France. Yale University Press. p. 72. ISBN   978-0-300-19065-6.
  6. Essential History of Art. Dempsey Parr. 2000. p. 63. ISBN   978-1-84084-952-3.
  7. 1 2 3 Lauro Martines (April 24, 2003). April Blood: Florence and the Plot against the Medici. Oxford University Press. p. 34. ISBN   978-0-19-988239-7.