1552

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1552 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1552
MDLII
Ab urbe condita 2305
Armenian calendar 1001
ԹՎ ՌԱ
Assyrian calendar 6302
Balinese saka calendar 1473–1474
Bengali calendar 959
Berber calendar 2502
English Regnal year 5  Edw. 6   6  Edw. 6
Buddhist calendar 2096
Burmese calendar 914
Byzantine calendar 7060–7061
Chinese calendar 辛亥(Metal  Pig)
4248 or 4188
     to 
壬子年 (Water  Rat)
4249 or 4189
Coptic calendar 1268–1269
Discordian calendar 2718
Ethiopian calendar 1544–1545
Hebrew calendar 5312–5313
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1608–1609
 - Shaka Samvat 1473–1474
 - Kali Yuga 4652–4653
Holocene calendar 11552
Igbo calendar 552–553
Iranian calendar 930–931
Islamic calendar 958–960
Japanese calendar Tenbun 21
(天文21年)
Javanese calendar 1470–1471
Julian calendar 1552
MDLII
Korean calendar 3885
Minguo calendar 360 before ROC
民前360年
Nanakshahi calendar 84
Thai solar calendar 2094–2095
Tibetan calendar 阴金猪年
(female Iron-Pig)
1678 or 1297 or 525
     to 
阳水鼠年
(male Water-Rat)
1679 or 1298 or 526
September: Siege of Eger. Vizkelety Bela Eger var ostroma 1552-ben.jpg
September: Siege of Eger.

Year 1552 ( MDLII ) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year starting on Friday is any year with 366 days that begins on Friday 1 January and ends on Saturday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are CB, such as the years 1808, 1836, 1864, 1892, 1904, 1932, 1960, 1988, 2016, 2044, 2072, and 2112 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2000 and 2028 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Tuesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this leap year occurs in May. Common years starting on Saturday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

Bartolomeo Eustachi completes his Tabulae anatomicae. Eustachi - Tabulae anatomicae, 1769 - 2981432.tif
Bartolomeo Eustachi completes his Tabulae anatomicae.

JanuaryJune

January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 350 days remaining until the end of the year.

Henry II of France 1519–1559, monarch of the House of Valois

Henry II was King of France from 31 March 1547 until his death in 1559. The second son of Francis I, he became Dauphin of France upon the death of his elder brother Francis III, Duke of Brittany, in 1536. Henry was the tenth king from the House of Valois, the third from the Valois-Orléans branch, and the second from the Valois-Orléans-Angoulême branch.

Maurice, Elector of Saxony Duke of Saxony and later Elector of Saxony

Maurice was Duke (1541–47) and later Elector (1547–53) of Saxony. His clever manipulation of alliances and disputes gained the Albertine branch of the Wettin dynasty extensive lands and the electoral dignity.

JulyDecember

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

Drégely Castle castle ruins in Drégelypalánk, Hungary

Drégely Castle is a 13th-century hilltop castle in Nógrád County, Hungary. It is in ruins, but being restored.

Ottoman Empire Former empire in Asia, Europe and Africa

The Ottoman Empire, also historically known in Western Europe as the Turkish Empire or simply Turkey, was a state that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia in the town of Söğüt by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman I. After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire. The Ottomans ended the Byzantine Empire with the 1453 conquest of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror.

Date unknown

Persian Gulf An arm of the Indian Ocean in western Asia

The Persian Gulf, is a mediterranean sea in Western Asia. The body of water is an extension of the Indian Ocean through the Strait of Hormuz and lies between Iran to the northeast and the Arabian Peninsula to the southwest. The Shatt al-Arab river delta forms the northwest shoreline.

Portugal Republic in Southwestern Europe

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic, is a country located mostly on the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe. It is the westernmost sovereign state of mainland Europe. It is bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and east by Spain. Its territory also includes the Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira, both autonomous regions with their own regional governments.

Hormuz Island Island in Hormozgān, Iran

Hormuz Island, also spelled Hormoz, is an Iranian island in the Persian Gulf. Located in the Strait of Hormuz, 8 kilometres (5 mi) off the Iranian coast, the island is part of Hormozgān Province.

Births

Walter Raleigh Sir Walter Ralegh by 'H' monogrammist.jpg
Walter Raleigh
Rudolph II Rudolf2c.jpg
Rudolph II
Vasili IV of Russia Vasili IV of Russia.PNG
Vasili IV of Russia
Matteo Ricci Ricciportrait.jpg
Matteo Ricci
Simon de Rojas SimondeRojasOSS.jpg
Simón de Rojas

January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 351 days remaining until the end of the year.

Alberico Gentili Italian jurist

Alberico Gentili was an Italian lawyer, jurist, and a former standing advocate to the Spanish Embassy in London, who served as the Regius professor of civil law at the University of Oxford for 21 years. Recognised as the founder of the science of international law alongside Francisco de Vitoria and Hugo Grotius, Gentili is perhaps one of the most influential people in legal education ever to have lived. He is one of the three men referred to as the "Father of international law". Gentili has been the earliest writer on public international law and the first person to split secularism from canon law and Roman Catholic theology. In 1587, he became the first non-English Regius Professor.

1608 Year

1608 (MDCVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1608th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 608th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1608, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Deaths

Henry of the Palatinate Furstengang Bischofe 48 - Heinrich II. von der Pfalz.jpg
Henry of the Palatinate
Henry V, Duke of Mecklenburg Heinrich V. (Mecklenburg-Schwerin).jpg
Henry V, Duke of Mecklenburg
Saint Francis Xavier Franciscus de Xabier.jpg
Saint Francis Xavier

Related Research Articles

1572 Year

Year 1572 (MDLXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1595 (MDXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1595th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 595th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1595, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1640 Year

1640 (MDCXL) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1640th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 640th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1640, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1627 Year

1627 (MDCXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1627th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 627th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1627, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1540 Year

Year 1540 (MDXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1631 Year

1631 (MDCXXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1631st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 631st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1631, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1634 Year

1634 (MDCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1634th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 634th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1634, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1643 Year

1643 (MDCXLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1643rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 643rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1643, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1585 Year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1585th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 585th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1591 Year

1591 (MDXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1591st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 591st year of the 2nd millennium, the 91st year of the 16th century, and the 2nd year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1591, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1590 Year

1590 (MDXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1590th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 590th year of the 2nd millennium, the 90th year of the 16th century, and the 1st year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1590, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1587 Year

1587 (MDLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1587th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 587th year of the 2nd millennium, the 87th year of the 16th century, and the 8th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1587, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1578 Year

Year 1578 (MDLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1553 Year

Year 1553 (MDLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1544 Year

1544 (MDXLIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1544th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 544th year of the 2nd millennium, the 44th year of the 16th century, and the 5th year of the 1540s decade. As of the start of 1544, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which was the dominant calendar of the time.

1532 Year

Year 1532 (MDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1515 Year

Year 1515 (MDXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Fierro, Maribel, ed. (2010). "Chronology". The New Cambridge History of Islam, Volume 2: The Western Islamic World, Eleventh to Eighteenth Centuries. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. xxxiii. ISBN   978-0-521-83957-0. Failed Ottoman attempt to conquer Hormuz.
  2. "Mirror of the Cruel and Horrible Spanish Tyranny Perpetrated in the Netherlands, by the Tyrant, the Duke of Alba, and Other Commanders of King Philip II". World Digital Library . 1620. Retrieved 2013-08-25.
  3. Grun, Bernard (1991). the Timetables of History (3rd ed.). New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 245. ISBN   0-671-74919-6.
  4. Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 218–223. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.