1562

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1562 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1562
MDLXII
Ab urbe condita 2315
Armenian calendar 1011
ԹՎ ՌԺԱ
Assyrian calendar 6312
Balinese saka calendar 1483–1484
Bengali calendar 969
Berber calendar 2512
English Regnal year 4  Eliz. 1   5  Eliz. 1
Buddhist calendar 2106
Burmese calendar 924
Byzantine calendar 7070–7071
Chinese calendar 辛酉(Metal  Rooster)
4258 or 4198
     to 
壬戌年 (Water  Dog)
4259 or 4199
Coptic calendar 1278–1279
Discordian calendar 2728
Ethiopian calendar 1554–1555
Hebrew calendar 5322–5323
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1618–1619
 - Shaka Samvat 1483–1484
 - Kali Yuga 4662–4663
Holocene calendar 11562
Igbo calendar 562–563
Iranian calendar 940–941
Islamic calendar 969–970
Japanese calendar Eiroku 5
(永禄5年)
Javanese calendar 1481–1482
Julian calendar 1562
MDLXII
Korean calendar 3895
Minguo calendar 350 before ROC
民前350年
Nanakshahi calendar 94
Thai solar calendar 2104–2105
Tibetan calendar 阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1688 or 1307 or 535
     to 
阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
1689 or 1308 or 536
December 19: Battle of Dreux BatailleDreux1562.jpg
December 19: Battle of Dreux

Year 1562 ( MDLXII ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

January 6 is the sixth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 359 days remaining until the end of the year.

Tyrone Gaelic kingdom of ancient and Medieval Ireland

Tyrone was a kingdom and later earldom of Gaelic Ireland, comprising parts of present-day County Tyrone, County Armagh and County Londonderry. The kingdom represented the core homeland of the Cenél nEógain people of the Northern Uí Néill and although they ruled, there were smaller groups of other Gaels in the area. Also known as the guidance of Land. One part of the realm to the north-east broke away and expanded, becoming Clandeboye, ruled by a scion branch of the Ó Néill.

Palace of Whitehall building in the City of Westminster, London

The Palace of Whitehall at Westminster, Middlesex, was the main residence of the English monarchs from 1530 until 1698, when most of its structures, except for Inigo Jones's Banqueting House of 1622, were destroyed by fire. It had at one time been the largest palace in Europe, with more than 1,500 rooms, overtaking the Vatican, before itself being overtaken by the expanding Palace of Versailles, which was to reach 2,400 rooms. The palace gives its name, Whitehall, to the street on which many of the current administrative buildings of the present-day British government are situated, and hence metonymically to the central government itself. At its most expansive, the palace extended over much of the area bordered by Northumberland Avenue in the north; to Downing Street and nearly to Derby Gate in the south; and from roughly the elevations of the current buildings facing Horse Guards Road in the west, to the then banks of the River Thames in the east —a total of about 23 acres (9.3 ha). It was about 710 yards (650 m) from Westminster Abbey.

JulyDecember

July 12 is the 193rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 172 days remaining until the end of the year.

Diego de Landa Spanish Bishop of Yucatán (1524–1579)

Diego de Landa Calderón, O.F.M. was a Spanish bishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Yucatán. Historians describe him as a cruel and fanatical priest who led a violent campaign against idolatry. In particular, he burned almost all the Mayan manuscripts (codices) that would have been very useful in deciphering Mayan script, knowledge of Maya religion and civilization, and the history of the American continent.

Maya civilization Mesoamerican civilization

The Maya civilization was a Mesoamerican civilization developed by the Maya peoples, and noted for its logosyllabic script—the most sophisticated and highly developed writing system in pre-Columbian Americas—as well as for its art, architecture, mathematics, calendar, and astronomical system. The Maya civilization developed in an area that encompasses southeastern Mexico, all of Guatemala and Belize, and the western portions of Honduras and El Salvador. This region consists of the northern lowlands encompassing the Yucatán Peninsula, and the highlands of the Sierra Madre, running from the Mexican state of Chiapas, across southern Guatemala and onwards into El Salvador, and the southern lowlands of the Pacific littoral plain.

Date unknown

Akbar third Mughal emperor

Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad Akbarابو الفتح جلال الدين محمد اكبر, popularly known as Akbar I, also as Akbar the Great, was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605. Akbar succeeded his father, Humayun, under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped the young emperor expand and consolidate Mughal domains in India. A strong personality and a successful general, Akbar gradually enlarged the Mughal Empire to include nearly all of the Indian Subcontinent north of the Godavari river. His power and influence, however, extended over the entire country because of Mughal military, political, cultural, and economic dominance. To unify the vast Mughal state, Akbar established a centralised system of administration throughout his empire and adopted a policy of conciliating conquered rulers through marriage and diplomacy. To preserve peace and order in a religiously and culturally diverse empire, he adopted policies that won him the support of his non-Muslim subjects. Eschewing tribal bonds and Islamic state identity, Akbar strove to unite far-flung lands of his realm through loyalty, expressed through an Indo-Persian culture, to himself as an emperor who had near-divine status.

Malwa Place in India

Malwa is a historical region of west-central India occupying a plateau of volcanic origin. Geologically, the Malwa Plateau generally refers to the volcanic upland north of the Vindhya Range. Politically and administratively, the historical Malwa region includes districts of western Madhya Pradesh and parts of south-eastern Rajasthan. The definition of Malwa is sometimes extended to include the Nimar region south of the Vindhyas.

Baz Bahadur Sultan of Malwa

Miyan Bayezid Baz Bahadur Khan was the last sultan of Malwa, who reigned from 1555 to 1562. He succeeded his father, Shuja'at Khan. He is known for his romantic liaison with Roopmati.

Pünte (Wiltshausen)

The Pünte in Wiltshausen, part of the borough of Leer in East Frisia, Germany, is a small, hand-operated ferry over the River Jümme, close to its confluence with the Leda. It links the villages of Amdorf and Wiltshausen and is the oldest, hand-hauled ferry in Northern Europe.

Births

Xu Guangqi Xu Guang Qi .jpg
Xu Guangqi
Lope de Vega LopedeVega.jpg
Lope de Vega

Deaths

Peter Martyr Vermigli Pietro Vermigli by Hans Asper.jpg
Peter Martyr Vermigli
Cornelis Aerentsz van der Dussen by Jan van Scorel Panel, Weiss Gallery, London Janvanscorel.jpg
Cornelis Aerentsz van der Dussen by Jan van Scorel Panel, Weiss Gallery, London

Related Research Articles

1564 Year

Year 1564 (MDLXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1707 Year

1707 (MDCCVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1707th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 707th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1707, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Tuesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1582 Year

1582 (MDLXXXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1582nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 582nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 82nd year of the 16th century, and the 3rd year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1582, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which had previously been the universally accepted calendar in Christian nations. However, this year saw the beginning of the Gregorian Calendar switch, when the Papal bull known as Inter gravissimas introduced the Gregorian calendar, adopted by Spain, Portugal, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and most of present-day Italy from the start. In these countries, the year continued as normal until Thursday, October 4. However, the next day became Friday, October 15, in those countries. Other countries continued using the Julian calendar for decades or, in some cases, centuries. The complete conversion of the Gregorian calendar was not entirely done until 1923. In the Proleptic Gregorian calendar, 1582 is a common year starting on Friday.

1566 Year

Year 1566 (MDLXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1554 Year

Year 1554 (MDLIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1621 Year

1621 (MDCXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1621st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 621st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1621, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1560 Year

Year 1560 (MDLX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1633 Year

1633 (MDCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1633rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 633rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1633, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1590 Year

1590 (MDXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1590th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 590th year of the 2nd millennium, the 90th year of the 16th century, and the 1st year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1590, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1577 Year

Year 1577 (MDLXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1576 Year

Year 1576 (MDLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1570 Year

Year 1570 (MDLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1569 Year

Year 1569 (MDLXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1692 Year

1692 (MDCXCII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1692nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 692nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1692, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1678 Year

1678 (MDCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1678th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 678th year of the 2nd millennium, the 78th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1678, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1563 Year

Year 1563 (MDLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1548 Year

Year 1548 (MDXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Moody, T. W.; et al., eds. (1989). A New History of Ireland. 8: A Chronology of Irish History. Oxford University Press. ISBN   978-0-19-821744-2.
  2. "Gorboduc, or the Tragedy of Ferrex and Porrox". Archived from the original on September 17, 2007. Retrieved November 14, 2007.
  3. 1 2 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 223–226. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  4. 1 2 Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 153–156. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  5. Evers, Vernd (2003). Architectural Theory: from the Renaissance to the present. Taschen. p. 845. ISBN   978-3-8228-1699-8.
  6. Vignola. Canon of the Five Orders of Architecture, translated with an introduction by Branko Mitrovic. New York: Acanthus Press, 1999). p. 17. ISBN   0-926494-16-3.