1727

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1727 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1727
MDCCXXVII
Ab urbe condita 2480
Armenian calendar 1176
ԹՎ ՌՃՀԶ
Assyrian calendar 6477
Balinese saka calendar 1648–1649
Bengali calendar 1134
Berber calendar 2677
British Regnal year 13  Geo. 1   1  Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar 2271
Burmese calendar 1089
Byzantine calendar 7235–7236
Chinese calendar 丙午(Fire  Horse)
4423 or 4363
     to 
丁未年 (Fire  Goat)
4424 or 4364
Coptic calendar 1443–1444
Discordian calendar 2893
Ethiopian calendar 1719–1720
Hebrew calendar 5487–5488
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1783–1784
 - Shaka Samvat 1648–1649
 - Kali Yuga 4827–4828
Holocene calendar 11727
Igbo calendar 727–728
Iranian calendar 1105–1106
Islamic calendar 1139–1140
Japanese calendar Kyōhō 12
(享保12年)
Javanese calendar 1651–1652
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar 4060
Minguo calendar 185 before ROC
民前185年
Nanakshahi calendar 259
Thai solar calendar 2269–2270
Tibetan calendar 阳火马年
(male Fire-Horse)
1853 or 1472 or 700
     to 
阴火羊年
(female Fire-Goat)
1854 or 1473 or 701
February 11: The Siege of Gibraltar begins. German print of the 1727 Gibraltar Siege.jpg
February 11: The Siege of Gibraltar begins.

1727 ( MDCCXXVII ) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar , the 1727th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 727th year of the 2nd millennium , the 27th year of the 18th century , and the 8th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1727, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2009, 2015, and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 323 days remain until the end of the year.

Spain Kingdom in Southwest Europe

Spain, officially the Kingdom of Spain, is a country mostly located in Europe. Its continental European territory is situated on the Iberian Peninsula. Its territory also includes two archipelagoes: the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa, and the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean Sea. The African enclaves of Ceuta, Melilla, and Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera make Spain the only European country to have a physical border with an African country (Morocco). Several small islands in the Alboran Sea are also part of Spanish territory. The country's mainland is bordered to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea except for a small land boundary with Gibraltar; to the north and northeast by France, Andorra, and the Bay of Biscay; and to the west and northwest by Portugal and the Atlantic Ocean.

Gibraltar British Overseas Territory

Gibraltar is a British Overseas Territory located at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula. It has an area of 6.7 km2 (2.6 sq mi) and is bordered to the north by Spain. The landscape is dominated by the Rock of Gibraltar at the foot of which is a densely populated town area, home to over 30,000 people, primarily Gibraltarians.

JulyDecember

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

History of the Ursulines in New Orleans

The Ursulines have a long history in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Ursulines religious institutes of the Catholic Church

The term Ursulines refers to a number of religious institutes of the Catholic Church. The best known group was founded in 1535 at Brescia, Italy, by Angela Merici (1474–1540), for the education of girls and the care of the sick and needy. Their patron saint is Saint Ursula. They are divided into two branches, one being the monastic Order of St. Ursula, among whom the largest group is the Ursulines of the Roman Union, described in this article. The other branch is the Company of St. Ursula, commonly called the "Angelines", who follow the original form of life established by their foundress.

Date unknown

Janet Horne was a woman from Scotland accused of witchcraft, and the last person to be executed legally for witchcraft in the British Isles.

Sutherland Historic county in Scotland

Sutherland is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area in the Highlands of Scotland. Its county town is Dornoch. Sutherland borders Caithness to the east, Ross-shire to the south and the Atlantic to the north and west. Like its southern neighbour Ross-shire, Sutherland has some of the most dramatic scenery in the whole of Europe, especially on its western fringe where the mountains meet the sea. These include high sea cliffs, and very old mountains composed of Precambrian and Cambrian rocks.

British Isles Group of islands in northwest Europe

The British Isles are a group of islands in the North Atlantic off the north-western coast of continental Europe that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Hebrides and over six thousand smaller isles. They have a total area of about 315,159 km2 and a combined population of almost 72 million, and include two sovereign states, the Republic of Ireland, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The islands of Alderney, Jersey, Guernsey, and Sark, and their neighbouring smaller islands, are sometimes also taken to be part of the British Isles, even though, as islands off the coast of France, they do not form part of the archipelago.

Births

James Wolfe James Wolfe.jpeg
James Wolfe

January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 363 days remain until the end of the year.

James Wolfe British Army officer

James Wolfe was a British Army officer, known for his training reforms and remembered chiefly for his victory in 1759 over the French at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in Quebec as a major general. The son of a distinguished general, Edward Wolfe, he received his first commission at a young age and saw extensive service in Europe where he fought during the War of the Austrian Succession. His service in Flanders and in Scotland, where he took part in the suppression of the Jacobite Rebellion, brought him to the attention of his superiors. The advancement of his career was halted by the Peace Treaty of 1748 and he spent much of the next eight years on garrison duty in the Scottish Highlands. Already a brigade major at the age of 18, he was a lieutenant-colonel by 23.

1759 Year

1759 (MDCCLIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1759th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 759th year of the 2nd millennium, the 59th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1759, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In Great Britain, this year was known as the Annus Mirabilis, because of British victories in the Seven Years' War.

Deaths

Isaac Newton GodfreyKneller-IsaacNewton-1689.jpg
Isaac Newton
George I of Great Britain King George I by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt (3).jpg
George I of Great Britain

Related Research Articles

The 1720s decade ran from January 1, 1720, to December 31, 1729.

1644 Year

1644 (MDCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1644th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 644th year of the 2nd millennium, the 44th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1644, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once.

1716 Year

1716 (MDCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1716th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 716th year of the 2nd millennium, the 16th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1716, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1630 Year

1630 (MDCXXX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1630th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 630th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1630, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1766 Year

1766 (MDCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1766th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 766th year of the 2nd millennium, the 66th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1760s decade. As of the start of 1766, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1669 Year

1669 (MDCLXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1669th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 669th year of the 2nd millennium, the 69th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1669, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1698 Year

1698 (MDCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1698th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 698th year of the 2nd millennium, the 98th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1698, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. The first year of the ascending Dvapara Yuga.

1696 Year

1696 (MDCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1696th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 696th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1696, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events from the year 1766 in art.

Events from the year 1727 in art.

Events from the year 1716 in art.

Events from the year 1630 in art.

Events from the year 1644 in art.

Events from the year 1696 in art.

Events from the year 1669 in art.

Alberto Pullicino Maltese painter

Alberto Pullicino, born Philiberto Pullicino, was a Maltese painter. The son of Giuseppe Pullicino and Angela Cantone, he was born in Valletta and probably lived there for his entire life.

Stefano Erardi (1630–1716) was a Maltese painter whose works may be found in many churches around the Maltese Islands. His style has been described as either late Mannerist or Baroque.

Pietro Erardi

Fra Pietro Erardi (1644–1727) was a Maltese chaplain and painter. He was a cleric and became a chaplain of obedience of the Order of St. John in 1669. He joined the Wignacourt College in Rabat in 1683 and remained there until his death.

Alessio Erardi (1669–1727) was a Maltese painter. He was the son of the artist Stefano Erardi and his wife Caterina Buttigieg. He initially studied art with his father, and eventually spent five and a half years in Rome between 1695 and 1701. His style is regarded as an early form of Baroque, and he was influenced by both his father and Mattia Preti.

Francesco Vincenzo Zahra was a Maltese painter who mainly painted religious works in the Neapolitan Baroque style. His works may be found in many churches around the Maltese Islands, as well as in some private collections and museums. He is considered to be the greatest painter from 18th-century Malta.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 301. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.
  2. 1 2 Everett, Jason M., ed. (2006). "1727". The People's Chronology. Thomson Gale.
  3. "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p49
  4. "Dornoch in the 18th century". Historylinks Museum. Retrieved August 27, 2010.
  5. K. M. Sheard (December 8, 2011). Llewellyn's Complete Book of Names: For Pagans, Wiccans, Druids, Heathens, Mages, Shamans & Independent Thinkers of All Sorts Who Are Curious about Na. Llewellyn Worldwide. pp. 304–. ISBN   978-0-7387-2368-6 . Retrieved June 28, 2012.
  6. Neill, W. N. (1923). "the Last Execution for Witchcraft in Scotland, 1722". Scottish Historical Review. 20: 218–21. JSTOR   25519547.
  7. Schiavone, Michael J. (2009). Dictionary of Maltese Biographies Vol. 1 A–F. Pietà: Pubblikazzjonijiet Indipendenza. p. 755. ISBN   9789993291329.
  8. Schiavone, Michael J. (2009). Dictionary of Maltese Biographies Vol. 1 A–F. Pietà: Pubblikazzjonijiet Indipendenza. p. 756. ISBN   9789993291329.