1302

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1302 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1302
MCCCII
Ab urbe condita 2055
Armenian calendar 751
ԹՎ ՉԾԱ
Assyrian calendar 6052
Balinese saka calendar 1223–1224
Bengali calendar 709
Berber calendar 2252
English Regnal year 30  Edw. 1   31  Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar 1846
Burmese calendar 664
Byzantine calendar 6810–6811
Chinese calendar 辛丑(Metal  Ox)
3998 or 3938
     to 
壬寅年 (Water  Tiger)
3999 or 3939
Coptic calendar 1018–1019
Discordian calendar 2468
Ethiopian calendar 1294–1295
Hebrew calendar 5062–5063
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1358–1359
 - Shaka Samvat 1223–1224
 - Kali Yuga 4402–4403
Holocene calendar 11302
Igbo calendar 302–303
Iranian calendar 680–681
Islamic calendar 701–702
Japanese calendar Shōan 4 / Kengen 1
(乾元元年)
Javanese calendar 1213–1214
Julian calendar 1302
MCCCII
Korean calendar 3635
Minguo calendar 610 before ROC
民前610年
Nanakshahi calendar −166
Thai solar calendar 1844–1845
Tibetan calendar 阴金牛年
(female Iron-Ox)
1428 or 1047 or 275
     to 
阳水虎年
(male Water-Tiger)
1429 or 1048 or 276

Year 1302 ( MCCCII ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 227 days remaining until the end of the year.

Bruges Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Bruges is the capital and largest city of the province of West Flanders in the Flemish Region of Belgium, in the northwest of the country.

June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 202 days remaining until the end of the year.

Date unknown

Roger de Flor Italian military adventurer and condottiere

Roger de Flor, also known as Ruggero/Ruggiero da Fiore or Rutger von Blum or Ruggero Flores, was an Italian military adventurer and condottiere active in Aragonese Sicily, Italy, and the Byzantine Empire. He was the commander of the Great Catalan Company and held the title Count of Malta.

Catalan Company Aragonese Company

The Catalan Company or the Great Catalan Company was a company of mercenaries led by Roger de Flor in the early 14th century and hired by the Byzantine Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos to combat the increasing power of the Turks. It was formed by almogavar veterans of the War of the Sicilian Vespers, who had remained unemployed after the signing in 1302 of the Peace of Caltabellotta between the Crown of Aragon and the French dynasty of the Angevins.

Almogavars

Almogavars is the name of a class of soldier from many Christian Iberian kingdoms in the later phases of the Reconquista, during the 13th and 14th centuries. Almogavars were lightly clad, quick-moving frontiersmen and foot-soldiers. They hailed from the Kingdom of Aragon, the Principality of Catalonia, the Kingdom of Valencia, the Crown of Castile and the Kingdom of Portugal. At first these troops were formed by farmers and shepherds originating from the countryside, woods and frontier mountain areas. Later, they were employed as mercenaries in Italy, Latin Greece and the Levant.

Births

December 7 is the 341st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 24 days remaining until the end of the year.

Azzone Visconti Lord of Milan

Azzone Visconti was lord of Milan from 1329 until his death. He is considered the founder of the state of Milan, which later became a duchy.

Year 1339 (MCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 346 days remaining until the end of the year.

Al-Hakim I Abu al-'Abbas Ahmad ibn Abi 'Ali al-Hasan held the position of the Abbasid Caliph of Cairo, Mamluk Egypt for the Mamluk Sultans between 1262 and 1302. He was an alleged great-great-great grandson of the Abbasid Caliph al-Mustarshid, who had died in 1135. When Baghdad fell to the Mongols in 1258, al-Hakim I escaped to Damascus where he befriended the Arab tribal chief 'Isa ibn al-Muhanna, who tried to set him up as caliph, but in the confusion surrounding the Mongol invasion of Syria in 1259-1260, he ended up in Aleppo, where he was proclaimed. However, the much closer and probably genuine uncle of the last Abbasid caliph al-Musta'sim, al-Mustansir II, was proclaimed caliph in Cairo in 1261. Al-Hakim I joined al-Mustansir II's invasion of Iraq, also submitting to al-Mustansir II as caliph, but the latter was slain with most of the invaders near Hīt in Iraq by the Mongols. Only about fifty troops escaped with al-Hakim, who, making his way back to Cairo and after a careful scrutiny of his genealogical claim to be an Abbasid, was proclaimed caliph in succession to al-Mustansir in 1262. Since al-Hakim's connection with the Abbasids is distant and faint, it cannot now be known whether he was really from that family as he claimed or not. In any case, al-Hakim I had no further adventures, served as a legitimating and ceremonial functionary for the Mamluk sultans in Cairo, reigned for thirty-nine years, and became the progenitor of all the subsequent Abbasid caliphs of Cairo, whether he was really an Abbasid or not. Although he was kept in office after 1262, the Mamluk sultans kept him as a virtual prisoner in the citadel, until Sultan Lajin released him in December 1296, allowing him to live in a house in the city and giving him a bigger financial emolument.

March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 297 days remaining until the end of the year.

Related Research Articles

Year 1282 (MCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1389 (MCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1204 (MCCIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1300s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1300, and ended on December 31, 1309.

Year 1147 (MCXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1220 (MCCXX) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1238 (MCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1338 (MCCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1484 (MCDLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1444 (MCDXLIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once.

Year 1303 (MCCCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1304 (MCCCIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1310 (MCCCX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1295 (MCCXCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1261 Year

Year 1261 (MCCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Frederick III of Sicily King of Sicily

Frederick II was the regent and subsequent King of Sicily from 1295 until his death. He was the third son of Peter III of Aragon and served in the War of the Sicilian Vespers on behalf of his father and brothers, Alfonso ΙΙΙ and James ΙΙ. He was confirmed as King of Trinacria by the Peace of Caltabellotta in 1302. His reign saw important constitutional reforms: the Constitutiones regales, Capitula alia, and Ordinationes generales.

The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting the Pope and the Holy Roman Emperor, respectively, in the Italian city-states of central and northern Italy. During the 12th and 13th centuries, rivalry between these two parties formed a particularly important aspect of the internal politics of medieval Italy. The struggle for power between the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire had arisen with the Investiture Controversy, which began in 1075 and ended with the Concordat of Worms in 1122. The division between the Guelphs and Ghibellines in Italy, fuelled by the imperial Great Interregnum, persisted until the 15th century.

The Treaty of Anagni was an accord between the Pope Boniface VIII, James II of Aragon, Philip IV of France, Charles II of Naples, and James II of Majorca. It was signed on 20 June 1295 at Anagni, in central Italy. The chief purpose was to confirm the Treaty of Tarascon of 1291, which ended the Aragonese Crusade. It also dealt with finding a diplomatic solution to the conquest of Sicily by Peter III of Aragón in 1285.

War of the Sicilian Vespers

The War of the Sicilian Vespers or just War of the Vespers was a conflict that started with the insurrection of the Sicilian Vespers against Charles of Anjou in 1282 and ended in 1302 with the Peace of Caltabellotta. It was fought in Sicily, Catalonia and elsewhere in the western Mediterranean between, on one side, the Angevin Charles of Anjou, his son Charles II, the kings of France, and the Papacy, and on the other side, the kings of Aragon. The war resulted in the division of the old Kingdom of Sicily; at Caltabellotta, Charles II was confirmed as king of the peninsular territories of Sicily, while Frederick III was confirmed as king of the island territories.

Henry III, Count of Bar 13th-century French nobleman

Henry III of Bar was Count of Bar from 1291 to 1302. He was the son of Theobald II, Count of Bar and Jeanne de Toucy.

References

  1. Lock, Peter (2013). The Routledge Companion to the Crusades. Routledge. p. 123. ISBN   9781135131371.