1256

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1256 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1256
MCCLVI
Ab urbe condita 2009
Armenian calendar 705
ԹՎ ՉԵ
Assyrian calendar 6006
Balinese saka calendar 1177–1178
Bengali calendar 663
Berber calendar 2206
English Regnal year 40  Hen. 3   41  Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar 1800
Burmese calendar 618
Byzantine calendar 6764–6765
Chinese calendar 乙卯年 (Wood  Rabbit)
3952 or 3892
     to 
丙辰年 (Fire  Dragon)
3953 or 3893
Coptic calendar 972–973
Discordian calendar 2422
Ethiopian calendar 1248–1249
Hebrew calendar 5016–5017
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1312–1313
 - Shaka Samvat 1177–1178
 - Kali Yuga 4356–4357
Holocene calendar 11256
Igbo calendar 256–257
Iranian calendar 634–635
Islamic calendar 653–654
Japanese calendar Kenchō 8 / Kōgen 1
(康元元年)
Javanese calendar 1165–1166
Julian calendar 1256
MCCLVI
Korean calendar 3589
Minguo calendar 656 before ROC
民前656年
Nanakshahi calendar −212
Thai solar calendar 1798–1799
Tibetan calendar 阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
1382 or 1001 or 229
     to 
阳火龙年
(male Fire-Dragon)
1383 or 1002 or 230
Hulagu Khan conquers Alamut Castle Prise d'Alamut (1256).jpeg
Hulagu Khan conquers Alamut Castle

Year 1256 ( MCCLVI ) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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  • October The Japanese Kenchō era ends and the Kōgen era begins during the reign of the 13-year-old Emperor Go-Fukakusa.

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Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1220</span> Calendar year

Year 1220 (MCCXX) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1238</span> Calendar year

Year 1238 (MCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1248</span> Calendar year

Year 1248 (MCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1221</span> Calendar year

Year 1221 (MCCXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

The 1250s decade ran from January 1, 1250, to December 31, 1259.

The 1210s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1210, and ended on December 31, 1219.

The 1220s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1220, and ended on December 31, 1229.

The 1230s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1230, and ended on December 31, 1239.

The 1270s is the decade starting January 1, 1270, and ending December 31, 1279.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1291</span> Calendar year

Year 1291 (MCCXCI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1275 Calendar year

Year 1275 (MCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1271 Calendar year

Year 1271 (MCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1231</span> Calendar year

Year 1231 (MCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1233 Calendar year

Year 1233 (MCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1253</span> Calendar year

Year 1253 (MCCLIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1257</span> Calendar year

Year 1257 (MCCLVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1258</span> Calendar year

Year 1258 (MCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1266</span> Calendar year

Year 1266 (MCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1287 Calendar year

Year 1287 (MCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Maymūn-Diz was a major fortress of the Nizari Ismailis of the Alamut Period described in historical records. It has been variously identified with the Alamut Castle, Navizar Shah Castle, Shirkuh Castle, Shahrak Castle, and Shams Kalayeh Cave. Recently, Enayatollah Majidi located it on top of Mount Shatan near Khoshk Chal.

References

  1. Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol III: The Kingdom of Acre, pp. 249–250. ISBN   978-0-241-29877-0.
  2. Peacock, A.C.S.; Yildiz, Sara Nur, eds. (2013). The Seljuks of Anatolia: Court and Society in the Medieval Middle East, pp. 118–119. I.B. Tauris. ISBN   978-0-85773-346-7.
  3. Willey, Peter (2005). Eagle's Nest: Ismaili Castles in Iran and Syria, pp. 75–85. Boomsbury Academic. ISBN   978-1-85043-464-1.
  4. Setton, Kenneth M. (1976). The Papacy and the Levant (1204–1571), Volume I: The Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries, p. 78. Philadelphia: The American Philosophical Society. ISBN   0-87169-114-0.
  5. Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol III: The Kingdom of Acre, p. 236. ISBN   978-0-241-29877-0.
  6. The Seismicity of Egypt, Arabia and the Red Sea: A Historical Review p. 40