1822

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1822 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1822
MDCCCXXII
Ab urbe condita 2575
Armenian calendar 1271
ԹՎ ՌՄՀԱ
Assyrian calendar 6572
Balinese saka calendar 1743–1744
Bengali calendar 1229
Berber calendar 2772
British Regnal year 2  Geo. 4   3  Geo. 4
Buddhist calendar 2366
Burmese calendar 1184
Byzantine calendar 7330–7331
Chinese calendar 辛巳(Metal  Snake)
4518 or 4458
     to 
壬午年 (Water  Horse)
4519 or 4459
Coptic calendar 1538–1539
Discordian calendar 2988
Ethiopian calendar 1814–1815
Hebrew calendar 5582–5583
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1878–1879
 - Shaka Samvat 1743–1744
 - Kali Yuga 4922–4923
Holocene calendar 11822
Igbo calendar 822–823
Iranian calendar 1200–1201
Islamic calendar 1237–1238
Japanese calendar Bunsei 5
(文政5年)
Javanese calendar 1749–1750
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4155
Minguo calendar 90 before ROC
民前90年
Nanakshahi calendar 354
Thai solar calendar 2364–2365
Tibetan calendar 阴金蛇年
(female Iron-Snake)
1948 or 1567 or 795
     to 
阳水马年
(male Water-Horse)
1949 or 1568 or 796
March 31: Chios massacre Eugene Delacroix - Le Massacre de Scio.jpg
March 31: Chios massacre

1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1822nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 822nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 22nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1822, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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Date unknown

Births

JanuaryJune

Francis Galton Francis Galton 1850s.jpg
Francis Galton
Jan Francisci-Rimavsky Jan Francisci 1862.png
Ján Francisci-Rimavský

JulyDecember

Gregor Mendel Gregor Mendel oval.jpg
Gregor Mendel
Louis Pasteur Louis Pasteur, foto av Paul Nadar, Crisco edit.jpg
Louis Pasteur

Deaths

JanuaryJune

JulyDecember

Percy Bysshe Shelley Percy Bysshe Shelley by Alfred Clint.jpg
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh Lord Castlereagh Marquess of Londonderry.jpg
Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh
William Herschel William Herschel01.jpg
William Herschel

Related Research Articles

Constantine Kanaris Greek politician and admiral

Constantine Kanaris or Canaris was a Greek Prime Minister, admiral and politician who in his youth was a freedom fighter in the Greek War of Independence.

1826 1826

1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1826th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 826th year of the 2nd millennium, the 26th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1826, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1828 1828

1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1828th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 828th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1828, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1840 1840

1840 (MDCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1840th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 840th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1840s decade. As of the start of 1840, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1820s Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1820s decade ran from January 1, 1820, to December 31, 1829. It saw the rise of the First Industrial Revolution. Photography, rail transport, and the textile industry were among those that largely developed and grew prominent over the decade, as technology advanced significantly. European colonialism began gaining ground in Africa and Asia, and trade between the Qing Dynasty began to open up more towards foreign traders, particularly those from Europe. As European imperialism gained momentum, opposition from affected/exploited societies resulted, with wars such as the Java War and the Greek War of Independence. Resistance in the form of separatism and nationalism led to the independence of many countries around the world, such as Brazil, Peru, and Bolivia.

1829 1829

1829 (MDCCCXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1829th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 829th year of the 2nd millennium, the 29th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1829, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1839 1839

1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1839th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 839th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1839, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1821 1821

1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1821st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 821st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1821, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1827 1827

1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1827th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 827th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1827, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1831 1831

1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1831st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 831st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1831, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1830 1830

1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1830th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 830th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1830, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1834 1834

1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1834th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 834th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1834, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1832 1832

1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1832nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 832nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 32nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1832, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1825 1825

1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1825th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 825th year of the 2nd millennium, the 25th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1825, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1824 1824

1824 (MDCCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1824th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 824th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1824, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1820 1820

1820 (MDCCCXX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1820th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 820th year of the 2nd millennium, the 20th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1820, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Chios massacre slaughter of tens of thousands of Greeks on the island of Chios by Ottoman troops during the Greek War of Independence in 1822

The Chios massacre was the killing of tens of thousands of Greeks on the island of Chios by Ottoman troops during the Greek War of Independence in 1822. Greeks from neighbouring islands had arrived on Chios and encouraged the Chians to join their revolt. In response, Ottoman troops landed on the island and killed thousands. The massacre of Christians provoked international outrage and led to increasing support for the Greek cause worldwide.

Decolonization of the Americas Process by which the countries in the Americas gained their independence from European rule

Decolonization of the Americas refers to the process by which the countries in the Americas gained their independence from European rule. The American Revolution was the first in the Americas, and the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) was a surprising victory against a great power. The French Revolution in Europe followed, and collectively these events had profound effects on the British, Spanish, Portuguese, and French colonies in the Americas. A revolutionary wave followed, resulting in the creation of a number of independent countries in Latin America. The Haitian Revolution lasted from 1791 to 1804 and resulted in the independence of the French slave colony. The Peninsular War with France, which resulted from the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, caused Spanish Creoles in Spanish America to question their allegiance to Spain, stoking independence movements that culminated in various Spanish American wars of independence, which lasted almost two decades. At the same time, the Portuguese monarchy relocated to Brazil during Portugal's French occupation. After the royal court returned to Lisbon, the prince regent, Pedro, remained in Brazil and in 1822 successfully declared himself emperor of a newly independent Brazil. Though the Russians also operated forts in California and Hawaii, the bulk of Russian America was sold to the United States in 1867 and became Alaska.

Chios expedition

The Chios expedition was an unsuccessful attempt of the regular Greek army and irregular military units for the recapture of Chios island during the final stages of the Greek War of Independence. Chios had participated in the Greek uprising against the Ottoman Empire, but had been captured and its population massacred by the Ottoman fleet in 1822.

Nasuhzade Ali Pasha

Nasuhzade Ali Pasha, commonly known as Kara-Ali Pasha, was an Ottoman admiral during the early stages of the Greek War of Independence. In 1821, as second-in-command of the Ottoman navy, he succeeded in resupplying the isolated Ottoman fortresses in the Peloponnese, while his subordinate Ismael Gibraltar destroyed Galaxeidi. Promoted to Kapudan Pasha, and led the suppression of the revolt in Chios and the ensuing Chios massacre in April 1822. He was killed when a fireship captained by Constantine Kanaris blew up his flagship in Chios harbour on the night of 18/19 June 1822.

References

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  2. "The Republic of Liberia, Its Products and Resources", by Gerald Ralston, in The Nautical Magazine and Naval Chronicle (October 1862) p520
  3. Rev. James Taylor, The Age We Live in: A History of the Nineteenth Century, from the Peace of 1815 to the Present Time (William Mackenzie Co., 1882) p286
  4. Finlay, George (1861). History of the Greek Revolution, Vol. I. Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons. pp. 316–318.
  5. Hyman, Anthony (1982). Charles Babbage: pioneer of the computer. Oxford University Press. p. 51ff. ISBN   0-19-858170-X.
  6. Prebble, John (1988). The King's Jaunt: George IV in Scotland, August 1822 'One and Twenty Daft Days'. London: Collins. ISBN   0-00-215404-8.
  7. Mungo Ponton, Earthquakes and Volcanoes: Their History, Phenomena, and Probable Causes (T. Nelson and Sons, 1870) pp223-225
  8. "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) pp71