1822

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1822 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1822
MDCCCXXII
Ab urbe condita 2575
Armenian calendar 1271
ԹՎ ՌՄՀԱ
Assyrian calendar 6572
Balinese saka calendar 1743–1744
Bengali calendar 1229
Berber calendar 2772
British Regnal year 2  Geo. 4   3  Geo. 4
Buddhist calendar 2366
Burmese calendar 1184
Byzantine calendar 7330–7331
Chinese calendar 辛巳年 (Metal  Snake)
4519 or 4312
     to 
壬午年 (Water  Horse)
4520 or 4313
Coptic calendar 1538–1539
Discordian calendar 2988
Ethiopian calendar 1814–1815
Hebrew calendar 5582–5583
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1878–1879
 - Shaka Samvat 1743–1744
 - Kali Yuga 4922–4923
Holocene calendar 11822
Igbo calendar 822–823
Iranian calendar 1200–1201
Islamic calendar 1237–1238
Japanese calendar Bunsei 5
(文政5年)
Javanese calendar 1749–1750
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4155
Minguo calendar 90 before ROC
民前90年
Nanakshahi calendar 354
Thai solar calendar 2364–2365
Tibetan calendar 阴金蛇年
(female Iron-Snake)
1948 or 1567 or 795
     to 
阳水马年
(male Water-Horse)
1949 or 1568 or 796
March 31: Chios massacre Eugene Delacroix - Le Massacre de Scio.jpg
March 31: Chios massacre
August 16: Funeral of Shelley Louis Edouard Fournier - The Funeral of Shelley - Google Art Project.jpg
August 16: Funeral of Shelley

1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1822nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 822nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 22nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1822, the Gregorian calendar was 12days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Births

January–June

Francis Galton Francis Galton 1850s.jpg
Francis Galton
Jan Francisci-Rimavsky Jan Francisci 1862.png
Ján Francisci-Rimavský

July–December

Gregor Mendel Gregor Mendel oval.jpg
Gregor Mendel
Louis Pasteur Louis Pasteur, foto av Paul Nadar, Crisco edit.jpg
Louis Pasteur

Deaths

January–June

Duke of Richelieu. Armand Emmanuel Duke of Richelieu.jpg
Duke of Richelieu.

July–December

Percy Bysshe Shelley Percy Bysshe Shelley by Alfred Clint.jpg
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh Lord Castlereagh Marquess of Londonderry.jpg
Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh
William Herschel William Herschel01.jpg
William Herschel

Date unknown

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Konstantinos Kanaris</span> Greek politician and admiral

Konstantinos Kanaris, also anglicised as Constantine Kanaris or Canaris, was a Greek admiral, Prime Minister, and a hero of the Greek War of Independence.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chios</span> Island in Greece

Chios is the fifth largest Greek island, situated in the northern Aegean Sea, and the tenth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. The island is separated from Turkey by the Chios Strait. Chios is notable for its exports of mastic gum and its nickname is "the Mastic Island". Tourist attractions include its medieval villages and the 11th-century monastery of Nea Moni, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1826</span> Calendar year

1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1826th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 826th year of the 2nd millennium, the 26th year of the 19th century, and the 7th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1826, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1828th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 828th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 19th century, and the 9th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1828, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1840</span> Calendar year

1840 (MDCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1840th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 840th year of the 2nd millennium, the 40th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1840s decade. As of the start of 1840, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1833</span> Calendar year

1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1833rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 833rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1833, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1820s</span> Decade of the Gregorian calendar

The 1820s was a decade of the Gregorian calendar that began on January 1, 1820, and ended on December 31, 1829.

1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1839th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 839th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1839, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1819</span> Calendar year

1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1819th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 819th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 19th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1819, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1821st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 821st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1821, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1827th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 827th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1827, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1830</span> Calendar year

1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1830th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 830th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1830, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1832</span> Calendar year

1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1832nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 832nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 32nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1830s decade. As of the start of 1832, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1825</span> Calendar year

1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1825th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 825th year of the 2nd millennium, the 25th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1825, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1817</span> Calendar year

1817 (MDCCCXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1817th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 817th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 19th century, and the 8th year of the 1810s decade. As of the start of 1817, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chios massacre</span> 1822 plunder, massacre and enslavement of the Greek inhabitants on the island of Chios

The Chios massacre was a catastrophe that resulted in the death, enslavement, and flight of about four-fifths of the total population of Greeks on the island of Chios by Ottoman troops, during the Greek War of Independence in 1822. It is estimated that up to 100,000 people were killed or enslaved during the massacre, while up to 20,000 escaped as refugees. Greeks from neighboring islands had arrived on Chios and encouraged the Chiotes to join their revolt. In response, Ottoman troops landed on the island and killed thousands. The massacre of Christians provoked international outrage across the Western world, and led to increasing support for the Greek cause worldwide.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Koca Hüsrev Mehmed Pasha</span> Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire from 1839 to 1840

Koca Hüsrev Mehmed Pasha was an Ottoman admiral, reformer and statesman, who was Kapudan Pasha of the Ottoman Navy. He reached the position of Grand Vizier rather late in his career, between 2 July 1839 and 8 June 1840 during the reign of Abdulmejid I. However, during the 1820s, he occupied key administrative roles in the fight against regional warlords, the reformation of the army, and the reformation of Turkish attire. He was one of the main statesmen who predicted a war with the Russian Empire, which would eventually be the case with the outbreak of the Crimean War.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Piali Pasha</span> Ottoman admiral

Piali Pasha was an Ottoman Grand Admiral between 1553 and 1567, and a Vizier (minister) after 1568. He is also known as Piale Pasha in English.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nasuhzade Ali Pasha</span> Ottoman admiral

Nasuhzade Ali Pasha, commonly known as Kara Ali Pasha, was an Ottoman-Albanian admiral during the early stages of the Greek War of Independence. In 1821, as second-in-command of the Ottoman navy, he succeeded in resupplying the isolated Ottoman fortresses in the Peloponnese, while his subordinate Ismael Gibraltar destroyed Galaxeidi. Promoted to Kapudan Pasha, and led the suppression of the revolt in Chios and the ensuing Chios massacre in April 1822. He was killed when a fireship captained by Konstantinos Kanaris blew up his flagship in Chios harbour on the night of 18/19 June 1822.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Burning of the Ottoman flagship off Chios</span> 18 June 1822 historical event

The burning of the Ottoman flagship off Chios took place on the night of 18 June 1822. The event, occurring during the Greek War of Independence, was a reprisal for the Chios massacre which occurred two months earlier. Two thousand Ottoman sailors were killed, as was Nasuhzade Ali Pasha, the Kapudan Pasha of the Ottoman Navy.

References

  1. Dadrian, Vahakn N. (1999). Warrant for Genocide: Key Elements of Turko-Armenian Conflict. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers. p.  153. ISBN   1560003898.
  2. "The Republic of Liberia, Its Products and Resources", by Gerald Ralston, in The Nautical Magazine and Naval Chronicle (October 1862) p520
  3. Rev. James Taylor, The Age We Live in: A History of the Nineteenth Century, from the Peace of 1815 to the Present Time (William Mackenzie Co., 1882) p286
  4. Finlay, George (1861). History of the Greek Revolution, Vol. I. Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons. pp. 316–318.
  5. Hyman, Anthony (1982). Charles Babbage: Pioneer of the Computer . Oxford University Press. pp. 51ff. ISBN   0-19-858170-X.
  6. Ambraseys, N.N. (1989). "Temporary seismic quiescence: SE Turkey". Geophysical Journal International. 96 (2): 311–331. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.1989.tb04453.x .
  7. Sbeinati, M.R.; Darawcheh, R. & Mouty, M. (2005). "The historical earthquakes of Syria: an analysis of large and moderate earthquakes from 1365 B.C. to 1900 A.D." (PDF). Annals of Geophysics. 48 (3): 347–435. Retrieved February 16, 2023.
  8. Gates, Barbara. Victorian Suicide: Mad Crimes and Sad Histories. Princeton University Press, 2014 p.3.
  9. Prebble, John (1988). The King's Jaunt: George IV in Scotland, August 1822 'One and Twenty Daft Days'. London: Collins. ISBN   0-00-215404-8.
  10. Mungo Ponton, Earthquakes and Volcanoes: Their History, Phenomena, and Probable Causes (T. Nelson and Sons, 1870) pp223-225
  11. "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) pp71