AD 69

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
AD 69 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar AD 69
LXIX
Ab urbe condita 822
Assyrian calendar 4819
Balinese saka calendar N/A
Bengali calendar −524
Berber calendar 1019
Buddhist calendar 613
Burmese calendar −569
Byzantine calendar 5577–5578
Chinese calendar 戊辰(Earth  Dragon)
2765 or 2705
     to 
己巳年 (Earth  Snake)
2766 or 2706
Coptic calendar −215 – −214
Discordian calendar 1235
Ethiopian calendar 61–62
Hebrew calendar 3829–3830
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 125–126
 - Shaka Samvat N/A
 - Kali Yuga 3169–3170
Holocene calendar 10069
Iranian calendar 553 BP – 552 BP
Islamic calendar 570 BH – 569 BH
Javanese calendar N/A
Julian calendar AD 69
LXIX
Korean calendar 2402
Minguo calendar 1843 before ROC
民前1843年
Nanakshahi calendar −1399
Seleucid era 380/381 AG
Thai solar calendar 611–612
Tibetan calendar 阳土龙年
(male Earth-Dragon)
195 or −186 or −958
     to 
阴土蛇年
(female Earth-Snake)
196 or −185 or −957
Map of the Year of the Four Emperors Roman Empire 69.svg
Map of the Year of the Four Emperors

AD 69 ( LXIX ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Rufinus [ citation needed ] (or, less frequently, year 822 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination AD 69 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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Galba Roman emperor from 68 to 69

Galba was Roman emperor from 68 to 69, the first emperor in the Year of the Four Emperors. He was known as Lucius Livius Galba Ocella prior to taking the throne as a result of his adoption by his stepmother, Livia Ocellina. The governor of Hispania at the time of the rebellion of Gaius Julius Vindex in Gaul, he seized the throne following Nero's suicide.

Otho Roman emperor in AD 69

Otho was Roman emperor for three months, from 15 January to 16 April 69. He was the second emperor of the Year of the Four Emperors.

Vitellius Roman emperor in 69

Vitellius was Roman emperor for eight months, from 16 April to 22 December 69 AD. Vitellius was proclaimed emperor following the quick succession of the previous emperors Galba and Otho, in a year of civil war known as the Year of the Four Emperors. Vitellius was the first to add the honorific cognomen Germanicus to his name instead of Caesar upon his accession. Like his direct predecessor, Otho, Vitellius attempted to rally public support to his cause by honoring and imitating Nero who remained widely popular in the empire.

AD 68 (LXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Silius Italicus and Trachalus, or the start of the Year of the Four Emperors. The denomination AD 68 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. These are now used throughout the world.

Revolt of the Batavi conflict

The Revolt of the Batavi took place in the Roman province of Germania Inferior between AD 69 and 70. It was an uprising against the Roman Empire started by the Batavi, a small but militarily powerful Germanic tribe that inhabited Batavia, on the delta of the river Rhine. They were soon joined by the Celtic tribes from Gallia Belgica and some Germanic tribes.

Year of the Four Emperors Year (69) in the history of the Roman Empire in which four emperors ruled in succession

The Year of the Four Emperors, 69 AD, was a period in the history of the Roman Empire in which four emperors ruled in succession: Galba, Otho, Vitellius, and Vespasian.

Flavia gens families from Ancient Rome who shared Flavius nomen

The gens Flavia was a plebeian family at ancient Rome. Its members are first mentioned during the last three centuries of the Republic. The first of the Flavii to achieve prominence was Marcus Flavius, tribune of the plebs in 327 and 323 BC; however, no Flavius attained the consulship until Gaius Flavius Fimbria in 104 BC. The gens became illustrious during the first century AD, when the family of the Flavii Sabini claimed the imperial dignity.

Calpurnia gens families from Ancient Rome who shared Calpurnius nomen

The gens Calpurnia was a plebeian family at ancient Rome, which first appears in history during the third century BC. The first of the gens to obtain the consulship was Gaius Calpurnius Piso in 180 BC, but from this time their consulships were very frequent, and the family of the Pisones became one of the most illustrious in the Roman state. Two important pieces of Republican legislation, the lex Calpurnia of 149 BC and lex Acilia Calpurnia of 67 BC were passed by members of the gens.

<i>The Twelve Caesars</i> 12 biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire, written by Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus in 121 CE

De vita Caesarum, commonly known as The Twelve Caesars, is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire written by Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi Licinianus was a Roman nobleman who lived in the 1st century. He was adopted by the Roman Emperor Galba as his heir to the throne, only to be killed during the Year of Four Emperors on the same day as Galba.

See also Titus Flavius Sabinus (disambiguation) for other men of this name.

Cornelius Fuscus was a Roman general who fought campaigns under the Emperors of the Flavian dynasty. During the reign of Domitian, he served as prefect of the imperial bodyguard, known as the Praetorian Guard, from 81 until his death in 86 AD. Prior to this appointment, Fuscus had distinguished himself as one of Vespasian's most ardent supporters during the civil war of 69 AD, known as the Year of the Four Emperors.

Scribonia Magna, known in modern historical sources as Scribonia Crassi, was a Roman noblewoman that lived in the Roman Empire. Scribonia was the daughter and only child of Lucius Scribonius Libo consul AD 16, and Cornelia Pompeia Magna.

Marcus Licinius Crassus Frugi was a Roman nobleman of consular rank who lived during the Roman Empire. Frugi’s mother was an unnamed Roman woman, while his father was consul and governor Marcus Licinius Crassus. Frugi’s adoptive paternal grandfather was consul and general Marcus Licinius Crassus. Crassus was the grandson of triumvir Marcus Licinius Crassus and the last known direct descendant of his grandfather. He had a sister called Licinia who married the consul Lucius Calpurnius Piso; their son, Gaius Calpurnius Piso, was a conspirator against the Emperor Nero.

Fabius Valens of Anagnia was a Roman commander favoured by Nero. In 69 he was commander of Legio I Germanica based in Germania Inferior. When the troops refused to endorse the new emperor Galba after Nero's death, he had them proclaim Vitellius, the governor of Germania Inferior, as emperor.

Gaius Calpetanus Rantius Quirinalis Valerius Festus was a Roman senator, general, and amicus to each of the Flavian emperors. He proved his value to the Flavians when, as legatus, or commander, of Legio III Augusta stationed in Africa, he assassinated the proconsul, who favored a rival of Vespasian during the Year of Four Emperors. He maintained his loyalty through the reigns of his sons Titus and Domitian, but fell out of favor during the latter's reign and was forced to commit suicide.

Aulus Marius Celsus was a Roman senator who held several offices in the emperor's service during the first century AD, as well as playing a role in the Year of Four Emperors. He was suffect consul of the nundinium of July–August 69 as the colleague of Gnaeus Arrius Antoninus.

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