1160

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1160 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1160
MCLX
Ab urbe condita 1913
Armenian calendar 609
ԹՎ ՈԹ
Assyrian calendar 5910
Balinese saka calendar 1081–1082
Bengali calendar 567
Berber calendar 2110
English Regnal year 6  Hen. 2   7  Hen. 2
Buddhist calendar 1704
Burmese calendar 522
Byzantine calendar 6668–6669
Chinese calendar 己卯(Earth  Rabbit)
3856 or 3796
     to 
庚辰年 (Metal  Dragon)
3857 or 3797
Coptic calendar 876–877
Discordian calendar 2326
Ethiopian calendar 1152–1153
Hebrew calendar 4920–4921
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1216–1217
 - Shaka Samvat 1081–1082
 - Kali Yuga 4260–4261
Holocene calendar 11160
Igbo calendar 160–161
Iranian calendar 538–539
Islamic calendar 554–555
Japanese calendar Heiji 2 / Eiryaku 1
(永暦元年)
Javanese calendar 1066–1067
Julian calendar 1160
MCLX
Korean calendar 3493
Minguo calendar 752 before ROC
民前752年
Nanakshahi calendar −308
Seleucid era 1471/1472 AG
Thai solar calendar 1702–1703
Tibetan calendar 阴土兔年
(female Earth-Rabbit)
1286 or 905 or 133
     to 
阳金龙年
(male Iron-Dragon)
1287 or 906 or 134

Year 1160 ( MCLX ) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year starting on Friday is any year with 366 days that begins on Friday 1 January and ends on Saturday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are CB, such as the years 1808, 1836, 1864, 1892, 1904, 1932, 1960, 1988, 2016, 2044, 2072, and 2112 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2000 and 2028 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Tuesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this leap year occurs in May. Common years starting on Saturday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Africa

Mahdia Place in Mahdia Governorate, Tunisia

Mahdia is a Tunisian coastal city with 62,189 inhabitants, south of Monastir and southeast of Sousse.

Republic of Pisa de facto independent state centered on the Tuscan city of Pisa during the late 10th and 11th centuries

The Republic of Pisa was a de facto independent state centered on the Tuscan city of Pisa during the late 10th and 11th centuries. It rose to become an economic powerhouse, a commercial center whose merchants dominated Mediterranean and Italian trade for a century before being surpassed and superseded by the Republic of Genoa. The power of Pisa as a mighty maritime nation began to grow and reached its apex in the 11th century when it acquired traditional fame as one of the four main historical Maritime Republics of Italy.

Asia

Japan Constitutional monarchy in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Yasovarman II was the ruler of the Khmer empire from 1160 to 1166. He succeeded Dharanindravarman II. In 1165, he was overthrown by the mandarin Tribhuvanadityavarman. His rule ended with his assassination by one of his subordinates.


Dharanindravarman II was king of the Khmer Empire from 1150 to 1160.

Europe

February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 331 days remaining until the end of the year.

Crema, Lombardy Comune in Lombardy, Italy

Crema is a city and comune in the province of Cremona, in the region of Lombardy in northern Italy. It is built along the river Serio at 43 kilometres (27 mi) from Cremona. It is also the seat of the Catholic Bishop of Crema, who gave the title of city to Crema.

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country in Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates San Marino and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in Southern Europe.

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Education

Births

October 4 is the 277th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 88 days remaining until the end of the year.

Alys of France, Countess of Vexin was the daughter of King Louis VII of France and his second wife, Constance of Castile.

Louis VII of France King of France

Louis VII, called the Younger or the Young, was King of the Franks from 1137 to 1180, the sixth from the House of Capet. He was the son and successor of King Louis VI, hence his nickname, and married Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine, one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in western Europe. The marriage temporarily extended the Capetian lands to the Pyrenees, but was annulled in 1152 after no male heir was produced.

Deaths

February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 323 days remaining until the end of the year.

Minamoto no Yoshitomo samurai of the late Heian period; the head of the Minamoto clan

Minamoto no Yoshitomo was the head of the Minamoto clan and a general of the late Heian period of Japanese history. His son Minamoto no Yoritomo became shōgun and founded the Kamakura shogunate, the first shogunate in the history of Japan.

Year 1123 (MCXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Related Research Articles

The 1160s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1160, and ended on December 31, 1169.

Year 1147 (MCXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1152 (MCLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1173 (MCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

The 1180s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1180, and ended on December 31, 1189.

Year 1232 (MCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1234 Year

Year 1234 (MCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1228 (MCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1205 (MCCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1180 (MCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1161 (MCLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1181 (MCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1191 (MCXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1190 (MCXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1169 starting on Thursday not Wednesday

Year 1182 (MCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1184 (MCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1185 (MCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1242 (MCCXLII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1249 (MCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. 1 2 Picard, Christophe (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  2. Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman, VIIIe-XIIIe siècle: L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 110. ISBN   2-7068-1398-9.
  3. Hunyadi, Zsolt; Laszlovszky, József. The Crusades and the Military Orders. Central European University. Dept. of Medieval Studies. p. 246. ISBN   978-963-9241-42-8.