Krasnoyarsk Krai

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Krasnoyarsk Krai
Красноярский край
Coat of arms of Krasnoyarsk Krai.svg
Coat of arms
Map of Russia - Krasnoyarsk Krai.svg
Coordinates: 59°53′N91°40′E / 59.883°N 91.667°E / 59.883; 91.667 Coordinates: 59°53′N91°40′E / 59.883°N 91.667°E / 59.883; 91.667
CountryRussia
Federal district Siberian [1]
Economic region East Siberian [2]
EstablishedDecember 7, 1934 [3]
Administrative center Krasnoyarsk
Government
  Body Legislative Assembly [4]
   Governor [4] Aleksandr Uss [5]
Area
[6]
  Total2,339,700 km2 (903,400 sq mi)
Area rank 2nd
Population
 (2010 Census) [7]
  Total2,828,187
  Estimate 
(2018) [8]
2,876,497 (+1.7%)
  Rank 13th
  Density1.2/km2 (3.1/sq mi)
   Urban
76.3%
   Rural
23.7%
Time zone UTC+7 (MSK+4   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg [9] )
ISO 3166 code RU-KYA
License plates 24, 84, 88, 124
OKTMO ID04000000
Official languagesRussian [10]
Website www.krskstate.ru

Krasnoyarsk Krai (Russian:Красноя́рский край, tr. Krasnoyarsky kray,IPA:  [krəsnɐˈjarskʲɪj ˈkraj] ) is a federal subject of Russia (a krai), with its administrative center in the city of Krasnoyarsk, the third-largest city in Siberia (after Novosibirsk and Omsk). Comprising half of the Siberian Federal District, Krasnoyarsk Krai is the largest krai in the Russian Federation, the second largest federal subject (after the neighboring Sakha Republic) and the third largest subnational governing body by area in the world, after Sakha and the Australian state of Western Australia. The krai covers an area of 2,339,700 square kilometers (903,400 sq mi), which is nearly one quarter the size of the entire country of Canada (the next-largest country in the world after Russia), constituting roughly 13% of the Russian Federation's total area and containing a population of 2,828,187, or just under 2% of its population, per the 2010 Census. [7]

Contents

Geography

Map including part of northern Krasnoyarsk Krai Operational Navigation Chart C-5, 2nd edition.jpg
Map including part of northern Krasnoyarsk Krai

The krai lies in the middle of Siberia, and occupies nearly half of the Siberian Federal District, almost splitting it in half, stretching 3,000 kilometres (1,900 mi) from the Sayan Mountains in the south along the Yenisei River to the Taymyr Peninsula in the north. It borders (counting clockwise from the sea) the Sakha Republic, Irkutsk, the Tuva Republic, the Republic of Khakassia, and Kemerovo, Tomsk, and Tyumen Oblasts, and the Kara Sea and Laptev Sea of the Arctic Ocean in the north.

The krai is located in the basin of the Arctic Ocean; a great number of rivers that flow through the krai drain into it eventually. The main rivers of the krai are the Yenisei, and its tributaries (from south to north): the Kan, the Angara, the Podkamennaya Tunguska, the Nizhnyaya Tunguska and the Tanama.

There are also several thousand lakes in the krai. The largest lakes include Beloye, Belyo, Glubokoye, Itat, Khantayskoye, Labas, Lama, Pyasina, Taymyr, and Yessey. The rivers and lakes are rich with fish.

The climate is strongly continental with large temperature variations during the year. Long winters and short, hot summers are characteristic for the central and southern regions where most of the krai's population lives. The territory of Krasnoyarsk Krai experiences conditions of three climate belts: arctic, subarctic, and humid continental. In the north there are less than 40 days with temperature above 10 °C (50 °F), while in the south there are 110-120 such days.

The average temperature in January is −36 °C (−32.8 °F) in the north and −18 °C (−0.4 °F) in the south. The average temperature in July is 5 to 10 °C (41 to 50 °F) in the north – where the most poleward tree line in the world is found at Ary-Mas – and +20 °C (68 °F) in the south. The annual precipitation is 316 millimeters (12.4 in) (up to 1,200 millimeters (47 in) in the foothills of the Sayan Mountains). Snow covers the central regions of the krai from early November until late March. The peaks of the Sayan Mountains higher than 2,400–2,600 metres (7,900–8,500 ft) and those of the Putorana Plateau higher than 1,000–1,300 metres (3,300–4,300 ft) are covered with permanent snow. Permafrost is absent at low altitudes south of Lesosibirsk, but as one moves north it grades from sporadic around the 58th parallel to extensive discontinuous around the 60th parallel and continuous north of the 63rd parallel.

The coastline contains a number of prominent peninsulas – from west to east the main ones are the Minina Peninsula, Mikhailov Peninsula, the Taymyr Peninsula (by far the largest, and itself containing the Zarya Peninsula, Oskara Peninsula and Chelyuskin Peninsula) and the Khara-Tumus Peninsula.

There are also a large number of islands off the krai's coast, the most prominent of which are (from west to east) Sibiryakov Island, Nosok Island, Dikson Island, Vern Island, Brekhovskiye Island (in the Yenisei Gulf), Krestovskiy Island, the Kamennye Islands, the Zveroboy Islands, the Labyrintovye Islands, the Plavnikovye Islands, Kolosovykh Island, the Mona Islands, Rykacheva Island, Gavrilova Island, Belukha and Prodolgovatyy Islands, the Nordenskiöld Archipelago, the Firnley Islands, the Heiberg Islands, Starokadomsky Island, Maly Taymyr Island, the Komsomolskaya Pravda Islands, the Faddey Islands, and the Saint Peter Islands. There are also a number of islands further out that fall under the administration of Krasnoyarsk Krai – the most prominent being Bolshoy Island, Sverdrup Island, the Izvestiy TSIK Islands, the Arkticheskiy Institut Islands, the Kirov Islands, Uyedineniya Island, Voronina Island, Severnaya Zemlya (the largest group), and Ushakov Island. The highest point of the krai is Grandiozny Peak in the East Sayan Mountains at an elevation of 2,922 meters (9,587 ft).

History

According to archaeologists, the first people reached Siberia circa 40,000 BC. [11] The Andronovo culture, a group of Bronze Age peoples, lived in the area around 2000–900 BCE, the remains of which were discovered in 1914 near the village of Andronovo, Uzhursky District. The grave-mounds and monuments of the Scythian culture in Krasnoyarsk Krai belong to the 7th century BCE and are ones of the oldest in Eurasia. A prince's grave, the Kurgan Arshan, discovered in 2001, is also located in the krai.

Russian settlement of the area (mostly by Cossacks) began in the 17th century. After the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway the Russian colonization of the area strongly increased.

During both the Tsarist and the Bolsheviks' times the territory of Krasnoyarsk Krai was used as a place of exile of political enemies. The first leaders of the Soviet state, Vladimir Lenin and Joseph Stalin were exiled to what is now the krai in 1897–1900 and 1903, respectively. In Stalin's era numerous Gulag camps were located in the region.

In 1822, the Yeniseysk Governorate was created with Krasnoyarsk as its administrative center that covered territory very similar to that of the current krai.

On June 30, 1908, in the basin of the Podkamennaya Tunguska River, there occurred a powerful explosion most likely to have been caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometers (3–6 miles) above the Earth's surface. The force of the explosion is estimated to be about 10–15 megatons. It flattened more than 2,000 square kilometers (500,000 acres) of pine forest and killed thousands of reindeer.

Krasnoyarsk Krai was created in 1934 after disaggregation of the West Siberian and East Siberian Krais and later included Taymyr and Evenk Autonomous Okrugs and Khakas Autonomous Oblast. In 1991, Khakassia separated from the krai and became a republic within the Russian Federation.

On January 1, 2007, following a referendum on the issue held on April 17, 2005, territories of Evenk and Taymyr Autonomous Okrugs were merged into the krai.

Politics

The seat of the oblast administration in the Revolution Square, 2005 Krasnoyarsk Mira 110 krai admin.jpg
The seat of the oblast administration in the Revolution Square, 2005

During the Soviet period, the high authority in the krai was shared between three persons: The first secretary of the Krasnoyarsk CPSU Committee (who in reality had the most authority), the chairman of the krai Soviet (legislative power), and the Chairman of the krai Executive Committee (executive power). Since 1991, CPSU lost all the power, and the head of the krai administration, and eventually the governor was appointed/elected alongside elected regional parliament.

The Charter of Krasnoyarsk Krai is the fundamental law of the region. The Legislative Assembly of Krasnoyarsk Krai is the province's regional standing legislative (representative) body. The Legislative Assembly exercises its authority by passing laws, resolutions, and other legal acts and by supervising the implementation and observance of the laws and other legal acts passed by it. The legislative assembly consists of 52 deputies. 22 of them are elected in 22 one-mandate electoral districts by plurality system, 2 in Taymyr, 2 in Evenkia, and 26 are elected by proportional system from the lists offered by political parties. The highest executive body is the Oblast Government, which includes territorial executive bodies such as district administrations, committees, and commissions that facilitate development and run the day to day matters of the province. The Oblast administration supports the activities of the Governor who is the highest official and acts as guarantor of the observance of the krai Charter in accordance with the Constitution of Russia.

In December 1991, president Boris Yeltsin appointed Arkady Veprev as the first governor of Krasnoyarsk Krai. In January 1993 Yeltsin appointed Valery Zubov as the second governor of Krasnoyarsk Krai. In Krasnoyarsk Territory governor elections were called. Zubov was elected in a universal election for a five-year term. The Legislative Assembly of Krasnoyarsk Krai was created as well.

In 1998, Zubov lost in the gubernatorial election to General Aleksandr Lebed, a politician well known in all Russia. In 2002 Lebed died in a helicopter accident.

In 2002, Alexander Khloponin, the governor of Taymyr Autonomous Okrug and an influential businessman, was elected a governor of Krasnoyarsk Krai. In 2007, he was nominated by president Vladimir Putin for re-election, and Khloponin was elected by the legislative assembly for the second term.

In 2010, after Khloponin was promoted to the office of the president's envoy in the North Caucasian Federal District, Lev Kuznetsov, a businessman and politician from Khloponin's circle, became the new governor of the krai.

Krasnoyarsk Krai is represented in the Federation Council of Russia, the upper house of the Russian parliament by two senators. In 2007, eight deputies were elected to the State Duma from Krasnoyarsk regional lists of different political parties.

Economy

Over 95% of the cities, a majority of the industrial enterprises, and all of the agriculture are concentrated in the south of the krai.

Natural resources

The krai is among the richest of Russia's regions in natural resources: 80% of the country's nickel, 75% of its cobalt, 70% of its copper, 16% of its coal, and 10% of its gold are extracted here. Krasnoyarsk also produces 20% of the country's timber. More than 95% of Russian resources of platinum and platinoids are concentrated in the krai.

Industry

The krai's major industries are: non-ferrous metallurgy, energy, forestry, chemicals, and oil refining. The major financial industrial groups of Krasnoyarsk Krai are:

Power generation

The two most powerful hydroelectric plants in Russia are at the Yenisei River:

Three are at its tributary Angara River:

It makes Krasnoyarsk Krai one of the most important producers of electric energy in Russia, and a desirable location for energy-intensive industries, such as aluminium plants. [ citation needed ]

Transportation

Administrative divisions

Map Krasnoyarsk Krai.png

Krasnoyarsk Krai consists of forty-four districts and sixteen towns of district significance. Two of the districts (Evenkiysky and Taymyrsky; the former autonomous okrugs) have special status.

Demographics

Population (including former Taymyr and Evenk Autonomous Okrugs): 2,828,187(2010 Census); [7] 3,023,525(2002 Census); [12] 3,596,260(1989 Census). [13]

Ethnic groups: The population of the krai mostly consists of Russians, and some other peoples of the former Soviet Union. The indigenous Siberian peoples make up no more than 1% of the population.

The 2010 Census reported the following ethnic composition: [7]

As of August 2009, Krasnoyarsk Krai recorded a natural growth of population for the first time in 16 years. [16]

Total fertility rate: [17] [18]
2003 - 1,35 | 2004 - 1,35 | 2005 - 1,31 | 2006 - 1,33 | 2007 - 1,44 | 2008 - 1,55 | 2009 - 1,61 | 2010 - 1,64 | 2011 - 1,64 | 2012 - 1,75 | 2013 - 1,78 | 2014 - 1,81 | 2015 - 1,84 | 2016 - 1,82(e)

Vital statistics for 2012

Settlements

Demographics for 2007

District Pop [20] BirthsDeathsNGBRDRNGR
Krasnoyarsk Krai2,890,35034,20638,470 -4,26411.8313.31 -0.15%
Taimirsky Dolgano-Nenetsky District 37,76859233525715.678.870.68%
Evenkiysky District 16,7053042337118.2013.950.43%
Abansky District 24,997346419-7313.8416.76-0.29%
Achinsky District 15,918226253-2714.2015.89-0.17%
Balakhtinsky District 23,761281409-12811.8317.21-0.54%
Beryozovsky District 38,527483543-6012.5414.09-0.16%
Birilyussky District 11,431159228-6913.9119.95-0.60%
Bogotolsky District 11,371151233-8213.2820.49-0.72%
Boguchansky District 48,312585626-4112.1112.96-0.08%
Bolshemurtinsky District 19,292207398-19110.7320.63-0.99%
Bolsheuluysky District 8,540112157-4513.1118.38-0.53%
Dzerzhinsky District 15,025180298-11811.9819.83-0.79%
Novosyolovsky District 15,128192226-3412.6914.94-0.22%
Partizansky District 11,003155233-7814.0921.18-0.71%
Pirovsky District 8,25197125-2811.7615.15-0.34%
Rybinsky District 23,393309422-11313.2118.04-0.48%
Sayansky District 13,058163235-7212.4818.00-0.55%
Severo-Yeniseysky District 10,9071531361714.0312.470.16%
Sukhobuzimsky District 23,050287362-7512.4515.70-0.33%
Taseyevsky District 13,962161234-7311.5316.76-0.52%
Turukhansky District 20,736249295-4612.0114.23-0.22%
Tyukhtetsky District 9,034111197-8612.2921.81-0.95%
Uzhursky District 33,952541586-4515.9317.26-0.13%
Uyarsky District 22,255250495-24511.2322.24-1.10%
Idrinsky District 14,037157252-9511.1817.95-0.68%
Ilansky District 26,436352453-10113.3217.14-0.38%
Irbeysky District 18,053241300-5913.3516.62-0.33%
Kazachinsky District 11,333162191-2914.2916.85-0.26%
Sharypovsky District 17,816244295-5113.7016.56-0.29%
Shushensky District 35,372392659-26711.0818.63-0.75%
Krasnoyarsk 905,00010,58510,936-35111.7012.08-0.04%
Achinsk 110,8381,3331,702-36912.0315.36-0.33%
Bogotol 21,997273407-13412.4118.50-0.61%
Borodino 18,759197247-5010.5013.17-0.27%
Divnogorsk 30,968337438-10110.8814.14-0.33%
Yeniseysk 19,086265278-1313.8814.57-0.07%
Zaozyorny 11,359184221-3716.2019.46-0.33%
Kansk 98,9651,1131,458-34511.2514.73-0.35%
Lesosibirsk 64,2159321,027-9514.5115.99-0.15%
Minusinsk 66,7708521,141-28912.7617.09-0.43%
Nazarovo 53,593568890-32210.6016.61-0.60%
Norilsk 206,3592,4021,1501,25211.645.570.61%
Sosnovoborsk 30,0743062753110.179.140.10%
Sharypovo 38,4955995831615.5615.140.04%
Yemelyanovsky District 45,908493633-14010.7413.79-0.30%
Kansky District 26,696361425-6413.5215.92-0.24%
Karatuzsky District 16,992215307-9212.6518.07-0.54%
Kezhemsky District 24,406277300-2311.3512.29-0.09%
Kozulsky District 18,292225344-11912.3018.81-0.65%
Krasnoturansky District 16,098201247-4612.4915.34-0.29%
Kuraginsky District 51,402669851-18213.0216.56-0.35%
Mansky District 17,684226365-13912.7820.64-0.79%
Minusinsky District 26,457339409-7012.8115.46-0.26%
Motyginsky District 18,152238257-1913.1114.16-0.10%
Nazarovsky District 23,6093903563416.5215.080.14%
Yeniseysky District 27,044353418-6513.0515.46-0.24%
Yermakovsky District 20,621310360-5015.0317.46-0.24%
Nizhneingashsky District 35,886448597-14912.4816.64-0.42%
Other245,2021,6732,020-3476.828.24-0.14%

Religion

Religion in Krasnoyarsk Krai as of 2012 (Sreda Arena Atlas) [21] [22]
Russian Orthodoxy
29.6%
Other Orthodox
2.4%
Other Christians
5.7%
Islam
1.6%
Rodnovery and other native faiths
0.8%
Spiritual but not religious
35.1%
Atheism and irreligion
15%
Other and undeclared
9.8%

As per the survey conducted in 2012, [21] 29.6% of the population of Krasnoyarsk Krai adheres to the Russian Orthodox Church, 5% declares to be a nondenominational Christian (excluding Protestant churches), 2% is an Orthodox Christian believer without belonging to any church or is a member of other (non-Russian) Orthodox churches, 1.5% is Muslim, 1% follows the Slavic native faith (Rodnovery), and 10.9% did not give an answer to the survey. In addition, 35% of the population declares to be "spiritual but not religious" and 15% to be atheist. [21]

Education

Krasnoyarsk is the site of the Siberian Federal University, one of the four largest educational institutions of Russia. Other notable higher education institutes of the krai are:

Nature and ecology

Many important industrial cities of Krasnoyarsk Krai, such as Krasnoyarsk, Norilsk, Achinsk, Kansk, Zheleznogorsk, and Minusinsk, suffer from environmental pollution.[ citation needed ]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Irbeysky District District in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia

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Kansky District District in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia

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Kozulsky District District in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia

Kozulsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the forty-three in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia. It is located in the southwest of the krai and borders with Birilyussky District in the north, Yemelyanovsky District in the east, Balakhtinsky District in the south, and with Nazarovsky, Achinsky and Bolsheuluysky Districts in the west. The area of the district is 5,305 square kilometers (2,048 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Kozulka. Population: 16,689 (2010 Census); 19,010 ; 22,076 (1989 Census). The population of Kozulka accounts for 47.9% of the district's total population.

Nizhneingashsky District District in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia

Nizhneingashsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the forty-three in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the krai and borders Abansky District in the north, Irkutsk Oblast in the east and southeast, and Ilansky District in the south and west. The area of the district is 6,143 square kilometers (2,372 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Nizhny Ingash. As of the 2010 Census, the total population of the district was 33,439, with the population of Nizhny Ingash accounting for 22.7% of that number.

Partizansky District, Krasnoyarsk Krai District in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia

Partizansky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the forty-three in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia. It is located in the south of the krai and borders with Uyarsky District in the north, Rybinsky District in the northeast, Sayansky District in the east, Kuraginsky District in the south, and with Mansky District in the west. The area of the district is 4,959 square kilometers (1,915 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Partizanskoye. Population: 10,254 (2010 Census); 12,437 ; 15,412 (1989 Census). The population of Partizanskoye accounts for 34.4% of the district's total population.

Severo-Yeniseysky District District in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia

Severo-Yeniseysky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the forty-three in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia. It is located in the center of the krai and borders with Evenkiysky District in the northwest, north, and east, Motyginsky District in the southeast, and with Yeniseysky District in the southwest and west. The area of the district is 47,242 square kilometers (18,240 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Severo-Yeniseysky. Population: 11,119 (2010 Census); 11,077 ; 17,163 (1989 Census). The population of the administrative center accounts for 62.5% of the district's total population.

Taymyrsky Dolgano-Nenetsky District District in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia

Taymyrsky Dolgano-Nenetsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the forty-three in Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia. It is located in the north of the krai above the Arctic Circle on the Taymyr Peninsula and borders with Laptev and Kara Seas in the north, the Sakha Republic in the east, Evenkiysky and Turukhansky Districts in the south, and with Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug in the west. The area of the district is 879,900 square kilometers (339,700 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Dudinka. Population: 34,432 (2010 Census); 39,786 ; 55,111 (1989 Census). The population of Dudinka accounts for 64.4% of the district's total population.

References

Notes

  1. Президент Российской Федерации. Указ №849 от 13 мая 2000 г. «О полномочном представителе Президента Российской Федерации в федеральном округе». Вступил в силу 13 мая 2000 г. Опубликован: "Собрание законодательства РФ", No. 20, ст. 2112, 15 мая 2000 г. (President of the Russian Federation. Decree #849 of May 13, 2000 On the Plenipotentiary Representative of the President of the Russian Federation in a Federal District. Effective as of May 13, 2000.).
  2. Госстандарт Российской Федерации. №ОК 024-95 27 декабря 1995 г. «Общероссийский классификатор экономических регионов. 2. Экономические районы», в ред. Изменения №5/2001 ОКЭР. (Gosstandart of the Russian Federation. #OK 024-95 December 27, 1995 Russian Classification of Economic Regions. 2. Economic Regions, as amended by the Amendment #5/2001 OKER. ).
  3. Resolution of December 7, 1934
  4. 1 2 Charter of Krasnoyarsk Krai, Article 46
  5. Official website of Krasnoyarsk krai. Viktor Alexandrovich Tolokonsky, Governor of Krasnoyarsk Krai (in Russian)
  6. Федеральная служба государственной статистики (Federal State Statistics Service) (May 21, 2004). "Территория, число районов, населённых пунктов и сельских администраций по субъектам Российской Федерации (Territory, Number of Districts, Inhabited Localities, and Rural Administration by Federal Subjects of the Russian Federation)". Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved November 1, 2011.
  7. 1 2 3 4 Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1 [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года [2010 All-Russia Population Census] (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service.
  8. "26. Численность постоянного населения Российской Федерации по муниципальным образованиям на 1 января 2018 года". Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  9. "Об исчислении времени". Официальный интернет-портал правовой информации (in Russian). June 3, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  10. Official throughout the Russian Federation according to Article 68.1 of the Constitution of Russia.
  11. "Arctic Social Sciences - Arctic Studies Center". Mnh.si.edu. Retrieved September 27, 2012.
  12. Russian Federal State Statistics Service (May 21, 2004). Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities—Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000](XLS). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian).
  13. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров [All Union Population Census of 1989: Present Population of Union and Autonomous Republics, Autonomous Oblasts and Okrugs, Krais, Oblasts, Districts, Urban Settlements, and Villages Serving as District Administrative Centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года [All-Union Population Census of 1989] (in Russian). Институт демографии Национального исследовательского университета: Высшая школа экономики [Institute of Demography at the National Research University: Higher School of Economics]. 1989 via Demoscope Weekly.
  14. "Перепись-2010: русских становится больше". Perepis-2010.ru. December 19, 2011. Retrieved September 27, 2012.
  15. http://www.statis.krs.ru/digital/region5/2007/Показатели%20естественного%20движения%20населения.pdf
  16. "Новости Красноярска и Красноярского края — ИА "Пресс-Лайн"". Press-line.ru. Retrieved September 27, 2012.
  17. Население ::Красноярскстат. Krasstat.gks.ru. Retrieved on 2013-08-20.
  18. http://www.gks.ru/wps/wcm/connect/rosstat_main/rosstat/ru/statistics/publications/catalog/doc_1137674209312
  19. Естественное движение населения в разрезе субъектов Российской Федерации. Gks.ru. Retrieved on 2013-08-20.
  20. "Территориальный орган Федеральной службы государственной статистики по Красноярскому краю - Население". Statis.krs.ru. Retrieved September 27, 2012.
  21. 1 2 3 "Arena: Atlas of Religions and Nationalities in Russia". Sreda, 2012.
  22. 2012 Arena Atlas Religion Maps. "Ogonek", № 34 (5243), 27/08/2012. Retrieved 21/04/2017. Archived.

Sources

Всероссийский Центральный Исполнительный Комитет. Постановление от 7 декабря 1934 г. «О разукрупнении Западносибирского и Восточносибирского краёв и образовании новых областей в Сибири». ( All-Russian Central Executive Committee . Resolution of December 7, 1934 On the Subdivision of West Siberian and East Siberian Krais and on the Establishment of New Oblasts in Siberia. ).