1067

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1067 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1067
MLXVII
Ab urbe condita 1820
Armenian calendar 516
ԹՎ ՇԺԶ
Assyrian calendar 5817
Balinese saka calendar 988–989
Bengali calendar 474
Berber calendar 2017
English Regnal year 1  Will. 1   2  Will. 1
Buddhist calendar 1611
Burmese calendar 429
Byzantine calendar 6575–6576
Chinese calendar 丙午(Fire  Horse)
3763 or 3703
     to 
丁未年 (Fire  Goat)
3764 or 3704
Coptic calendar 783–784
Discordian calendar 2233
Ethiopian calendar 1059–1060
Hebrew calendar 4827–4828
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1123–1124
 - Shaka Samvat 988–989
 - Kali Yuga 4167–4168
Holocene calendar 11067
Igbo calendar 67–68
Iranian calendar 445–446
Islamic calendar 459–460
Japanese calendar Jiryaku 3
(治暦3年)
Javanese calendar 971–972
Julian calendar 1067
MLXVII
Korean calendar 3400
Minguo calendar 845 before ROC
民前845年
Nanakshahi calendar −401
Seleucid era 1378/1379 AG
Thai solar calendar 1609–1610
Tibetan calendar 阳火马年
(male Fire-Horse)
1193 or 812 or 40
     to 
阴火羊年
(female Fire-Goat)
1194 or 813 or 41
Emperor Shen Zong (1048-1085) Shenzong of Song.jpg
Emperor Shen Zong (1048–1085)

Year 1067 ( MLXVII ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Events

By place

Byzantine Empire

May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 223 days remaining until the end of the year.

Constantine X Doukas Byzantine emperor

Constantine X Doukas or Dukas, Latinised as Ducas was Byzantine Emperor from 1059 to 1067. He was the founder and first ruling member of the short-lived Doukid dynasty. During his reign, the Normans took over much of the remaining Byzantine territories in Italy while in the Balkans the Hungarians occupied Belgrade. He also suffered defeats against the Seljuk sultan Alp Arslan.

Constantinople capital city of the Eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire, the Latin and the Ottoman Empire

Constantinople was the capital city of the Roman Empire (330–395), of the Byzantine Empire, and also of the brief Crusader state known as the Latin Empire (1204–1261), until finally falling to the Ottoman Empire (1453–1923). It was reinaugurated in 324 from ancient Byzantium as the new capital of the Roman Empire by Emperor Constantine the Great, after whom it was named, and dedicated on 11 May 330. The city was located in what is now the European side and the core of modern Istanbul.

Seljuk Empire

Mesopotamia area of the Tigris–Euphrates river system

Mesopotamia is a historical region of Western Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran–Iraq borders.

Cilicia ancient region of Anatolia

In antiquity, Cilicia was the south coastal region of Asia Minor and existed as a political entity from Hittite times into the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia during the late Byzantine Empire. Extending inland from the southeastern coast of modern Turkey, Cilicia is due north and northeast of the island of Cyprus and corresponds to the modern region of Çukurova in Turkey.

Cappadocia Place in Katpatuka

Cappadocia is a historical region in Central Anatolia, largely in the Nevşehir, Kayseri, Kırşehir, Aksaray, and Niğde Provinces in Turkey.

Europe

March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 303 days remaining until the end of the year.

Battle on the Nemiga River

The Battle on the Nemiga River was a battle of the Kievan Rus' feudal period that occurred on March 3, 1067 on the Niamiha River. The description of the battle is the first reference to Minsk in the chronicles of Belarusian history.

Yaroslav the Wise Grand Prince of Rus

Yaroslav I, Grand Prince of Rus', known as Yaroslav the Wise or Iaroslav the Wise was thrice grand prince of Veliky Novgorod and Kiev, uniting the two principalities for a time under his rule. Yaroslav's Christian name was George (Yuri) after Saint George.

England

William I, usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke of Normandy from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son.

Duchy of Normandy Medieval duchy in northern France

The Duchy of Normandy grew out of the 911 Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte between King Charles III of West Francia and Rollo, leader of the Vikings. The duchy was named for its inhabitants, the Normans.

Edgar Ætheling 11th-century claimant to the throne of England

Edgar Ætheling or Edgar II was the last male member of the royal house of Cerdic of Wessex. He was elected King of England by the Witenagemot in 1066, but never crowned.

China

January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 340 days remaining until the end of the year.

Emperor Yingzong of Song 11th-century Chinese emperor

Emperor Yingzong of Song, personal name Zhao Shu, was the fifth emperor of the Song dynasty in China. His original personal name was Zhao Zongshi but it was changed to "Zhao Shu" in 1062 by imperial decree. He reigned from 1063 to his death in 1067. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Emperor Shenzong.

Song dynasty Chinese historical period

The Song dynasty was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and lasted until 1279. The dynasty was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of the Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia dynasties in the north. It was eventually conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass.

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Religion

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 1060s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1060, and ended on December 31, 1069.

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

1028 Year

Year 1028 (MXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

995 Year

Year 995 (CMXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

961 Year

Year 961 (CMLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1010 (MX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1015 Year

Year in topic Year 1015 (MXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1050 Year

Year 1050 (ML) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1060 Year

Year 1060 (MLX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1068 Year

Year 1068 (MLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1025 Year

Year 1025 (MXXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1031 Year

Year 1031 (MXXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1032 Year

Year 1032 (MXXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1035 Year

Year 1035 (MXXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1037 Year

Year 1037 (MXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1047 Year

Year 1047 (MXLVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1048 Year

Year 1048 (MXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1051 Year

Year 1051 (MLI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

970 Year

Year 970 (CMLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

References

  1. John Julius Norwich (1991). Byzantium: The Apogee – The Choice of Emperor, p. 343. ISBN   0-394-53779-3.
  2. Brian Todd Carey (2012). Road to Manzikert: Byzantine and Islamic Warfare (527–1071), p. 132. ISBN   978-184884-215-1.
  3. "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, p. 24. Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876)