6th century BC

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The 6th century BC started the first day of 600 BC and ended the last day of 501 BC.

The year 600 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire, it was known as year 154 Ab urbe condita. The denomination 600 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The year 501 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Auruncus and Lartius. The denomination 501 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Contents

This century represents the peak of a period in human history popularly known as Axial Age. This period saw the emergence of five major thought streams springing from five great thinkers in different parts of the world: Buddha and Mahavira in India, Zoroaster in Persia, Pythagoras in Greece and Confucius in China. Pāṇini, in India, composed a grammar for Tamil keeladi, in this century or slightly later. [1] This is the oldest still known grammar of any language.

Axial Age is a term coined by German philosopher Karl Jaspers in the sense of a "pivotal age", characterizing the period of ancient history from about the 8th to the 3rd century BCE.

Mahavira 24th Tirthankara of Jainism, last in current cycle of Jain cosmology

Mahavira, also known as Vardhamāna, was the twenty-fourth tirthankara who revived and reorganized Jainism. He expounded the spiritual, philosophical and ethical teachings of the previous tirthankaras from the remote pre-Vedic era. He was the spiritual successor of 23rd tirthankar Parshvanatha. In the Jain tradition, it is known that Mahavira was born in the early part of the 6th century BCE into a royal Kshatriya Jain family in present-day Bihar, India. He abandoned all worldly possessions at the age of 30 and left home in pursuit of spiritual awakening, becoming an ascetic. Mahavira practiced intense meditation and severe austerities for 12 years, after which he is believed to have attained Kevala Jnana (omniscience). He preached for 30 years and is believed by Jains to have attained moksha in the 6th century BC, although the year varies by sect.

Zoroaster Founder of Zoroastrianism

Zoroaster, also known as Zarathustra, Zarathushtra Spitama or Ashu Zarathushtra was an ancient Iranian spiritual leader who founded what is now known as Zoroastrianism. His teachings challenged the existing traditions of the Indo-Iranian religion and inaugurated a movement that eventually became the dominant religion in Ancient Persia. He was a native speaker of Old Avestan and lived in the eastern part of the Iranian Plateau, but his exact birthplace is uncertain.

In Western Asia, the first half of this century was dominated by the Neo-Babylonian or Chaldean empire, which had risen to power late in the previous century after successfully rebelling against Assyrian rule. The Kingdom of Judah came to an end in 586 BC when Babylonian forces under Nebuchadnezzar II captured Jerusalem, and removed most of its population to their own lands. Babylonian rule was ended in the 540s by Cyrus, who founded the Persian Empire in its place. The Persian Empire continued to expand and grew into the greatest empire the world had known at the time.

Western Asia Westernmost portion of Asia

Western Asia, West Asia, Southwestern Asia or Southwest Asia is the westernmost subregion of Asia. The concept is in limited use, as it significantly overlaps with the Middle East, the main difference usually being the exclusion of the majority of Egypt, which would be counted as part of North Africa, and of European Turkey and the inclusion of the Caucasus. The term is sometimes used for the purposes of grouping countries in statistics, in which case Egypt might be excluded and Turkey included entirely. The total population of Western Asia is an estimated 300 million as of 2015. Although the term "Western Asia" is mostly used as a convenient division of contemporary sovereign states into a manageable number of world regions for statistical purposes, it is sometimes used instead of the more geopolitical term "Middle East".

Neo-Babylonian Empire Former empire

The Neo-Babylonian Empire was a period of Mesopotamian history which began in 626 BC and ended in 539 BC. During the preceding three centuries, Babylonia had been ruled by their fellow Akkadian speakers and northern neighbours, Assyria. A year after the death of the last strong Assyrian ruler, Ashurbanipal, in 627 BC, the Assyrian empire spiralled into a series of brutal civil wars. Babylonia rebelled under the Chaldean Nabopolassar. In alliance with the Medes, Persians, Scythians and Cimmerians, they sacked the city of Nineveh in 612 BC, and the seat of empire was transferred to Babylonia for the first time since the death of Hammurabi in the mid-18th century BC. This period witnessed a general improvement in economic life and agricultural production, and a great flourishing of architectural projects, the arts and science.

Assyria Major Mesopotamian East Semitic kingdom

Assyria, also called the Assyrian Empire, was a Mesopotamian kingdom and empire of the ancient Near East and the Levant that existed as a state from perhaps as early as the 25th century BC until its collapse between 612 BC and 609 BC - spanning the periods of the Early to Middle Bronze Age through to the late Iron Age. From the end of the seventh century BC to the mid-seventh century AD, it survived as a geopolitical entity, for the most part ruled by foreign powers such as the Parthian and early Sasanian Empires between the mid-second century BC and late third century AD, the final part of which period saw Mesopotamia become a major centre of Syriac Christianity and the birthplace of the Church of the East.

In Iron Age Europe, the Celtic expansion was in progress. China was in the Spring and Autumn period.

In Europe, the Iron Age is the last stage of the prehistoric period and the first of the protohistoric periods, which initially means descriptions of a particular area by Greek and Roman writers. For much of Europe, the period came to an abrupt local end after conquest by the Romans, though ironworking remained the dominant technology until recent times. Elsewhere it may last until the early centuries AD, and either Christianization or a new conquest in the Migration Period.

Celts Ethnolinguistic group

The Celts are an Indo-European ethnolinguistic group of Europe identified by their use of Celtic languages and cultural similarities. The history of pre-Celtic Europe and the exact relationship between ethnic, linguistic and cultural factors in the Celtic world remains uncertain and controversial. The exact geographic spread of the ancient Celts is disputed; in particular, the ways in which the Iron Age inhabitants of Great Britain and Ireland should be regarded as Celts have become a subject of controversy. According to one theory, the common root of the Celtic languages, the Proto-Celtic language, arose in the Late Bronze Age Urnfield culture of Central Europe, which flourished from around 1200 BC.

Spring and Autumn period period of ancient Chinese history

The Spring and Autumn period was a period in Chinese history from approximately 771 to 476 BC which corresponds roughly to the first half of the Eastern Zhou period. The period's name derives from the Spring and Autumn Annals, a chronicle of the state of Lu between 722 and 479 BC, which tradition associates with Confucius.

5th century BC Century

The 5th century BC started the first day of 500 BC and ended the last day of 401 BC.

Hallstatt culture Archaeological culture in Europe

The Hallstatt culture was the predominant Western and Central European culture of Late Bronze Age from the 12th to 8th centuries BC and Early Iron Age Europe from the 8th to 6th centuries BC, developing out of the Urnfield culture of the 12th century BC and followed in much of its area by the La Tène culture. It is commonly associated with Proto-Celtic and Celtic populations in the Western Hallstatt zone and with (pre-)Illyrians in the eastern Hallstatt zone.

Eastern Europe Eastern part of the European continent

Eastern Europe is the eastern part of the European continent. There is no consistent definition of the precise area it covers, partly because the term has a wide range of geopolitical, geographical, cultural, and socioeconomic connotations. There are "almost as many definitions of Eastern Europe as there are scholars of the region". A related United Nations paper adds that "every assessment of spatial identities is essentially a social and cultural construct". One definition describes Eastern Europe as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences. Another definition was created during the Cold War and used more or less synonymously with the term Eastern Bloc. A similar definition names the formerly communist European states outside the Soviet Union as Eastern Europe. The majority of historians and social scientists view such definitions as outdated or relegated, but they are still sometimes used for statistical purposes.

Events

590s BC

Monument 1, an Olmec colossal head at La Venta Olmeca head in Villahermosa.jpg
Monument 1, an Olmec colossal head at La Venta

The year 598 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire, it was known as year 156 Ab urbe condita. The denomination 598 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Jehoiakim King of Judah

Jehoiakim was a king of Judah from 609 to 598 BC. He was the second son of king Josiah and Zebidah, the daughter of Pedaiah of Rumah. His birth name was Eliakim.

The year 597 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire, it was known as year 157 Ab urbe condita. The denomination 597 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

580s BC

An engraving on an eye stone of onyx with an inscription of Nebuchadnezzar II Nebukadnessar II.jpg
An engraving on an eye stone of onyx with an inscription of Nebuchadnezzar II
Medieval image of Thales Nuremberg chronicles f 59r 2.png
Medieval image of Thales

570s BC

560s BC

Croesus on the pyre, Attic red-figure amphora Kroisos stake Louvre G197.jpg
Croesus on the pyre, Attic red-figure amphora
Faravahar, a symbol of Zoroastrianism in Persepolis Persepolis - carved Faravahar.JPG
Faravahar, a symbol of Zoroastrianism in Persepolis

550s BC

540s BC

530s BC

Tomb of Cyrus in Pasargadae Pasargadae 2.jpg
Tomb of Cyrus in Pasargadae

520s BC

Gautama Buddha Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Victory Over Mara.jpeg
Gautama Buddha

510s BC

Image of Laozi Lao Tzu - Project Gutenberg eText 15250.jpg
Image of Laozi

500s BC

Unknown Events

Significant people

Solon Solon.jpg
Solon
Darius I Darius In Parse.JPG
Darius I
L. Junius Brutus Capitoline Brutus Musei Capitolini MC1183.jpg
L. Junius Brutus
Pythagoras Kapitolinischer Pythagoras adjusted.jpg
Pythagoras
Laozi Shanghai Museum 2006 17-36.jpg
Laozi
Sappho Bust Sappho Musei Capitolini MC1164.jpg
Sappho
Aeschylus Aischylos Buste.jpg
Aeschylus
Aesop Aesop pushkin01.jpg
Aesop
Sun Tzu Enchoen27n3200.jpg
Sun Tzu

Political leaders

Arts and entertainment

Literature

Philosophy and religion

Sports

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

Sovereign States

See: List of sovereign states in the 6th century BC.

Related Research Articles

Behistun Inscription ancient stone inscription in present-day Iran

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Cambyses II son of Cyrus the Great

Cambyses II was the second King of Kings of the Achaemenid Empire from 530 to 522 BC. He was the son and successor of Cyrus the Great and his mother was Cassandane.

Darius the Great 4th king of the Persian Achaemenid Empire (550–486 BC)

Darius I, commonly known as Darius the Great, was the fourth Persian King of Kings of the Achaemenid Empire. He ruled the empire at its peak, when it included much of West Asia, the Caucasus, parts of the Balkans, most of the Black Sea coastal regions, parts of the North Caucasus, Central Asia, as far as the Indus Valley in the far east and portions of north and northeast Africa including Egypt (Mudrâya), eastern Libya, and coastal Sudan.

This article concerns the period 539 BC – 530 BC.

This article concerns the period 549 BC – 540 BC.

This article concerns the period 529 BC – 520 BC.

This article concerns the period 519 BC – 510 BC.

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This article concerns the period 409 BC – 400 BC.

This article concerns the period 579 BC – 570 BC.

This article concerns the period 609 BC – 600 BC.

This article concerns the period 619 BC – 610 BC.

This article concerns the period 339 BC – 330 BC.

Year 401 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Potitus, Cossus, Camillus, Ambustus, Mamercinus and Iullus. The denomination 401 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

<i>Histories</i> (Herodotus) book by Herodotus

The Histories of Herodotus is considered the founding work of history in Western literature. Written in 440 BC in the Ionic dialect of classical Greek, The Histories serves as a record of the ancient traditions, politics, geography, and clashes of various cultures that were known in Western Asia, Northern Africa and Greece at that time. Although not a fully impartial record, it remains one of the West's most important sources regarding these affairs. Moreover, it established the genre and study of history in the Western world.

References

  1. Ritual and mantras: rules without meaning Google Books
  2. "History of the SUDAN". www.historyworld.net. 2007. Archived from the original on 14 July 2007. Retrieved 3 August 2007.
  3. Daniel 10:4 Bible Online
  4. Anhui Provincial Institute (2015), p. 82.

Books

Decades and years