1147

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1147 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1147
MCXLVII
Ab urbe condita 1900
Armenian calendar 596
ԹՎ ՇՂԶ
Assyrian calendar 5897
Balinese saka calendar 1068–1069
Bengali calendar 554
Berber calendar 2097
English Regnal year 12  Ste. 1   13  Ste. 1
Buddhist calendar 1691
Burmese calendar 509
Byzantine calendar 6655–6656
Chinese calendar 丙寅(Fire  Tiger)
3843 or 3783
     to 
丁卯年 (Fire  Rabbit)
3844 or 3784
Coptic calendar 863–864
Discordian calendar 2313
Ethiopian calendar 1139–1140
Hebrew calendar 4907–4908
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1203–1204
 - Shaka Samvat 1068–1069
 - Kali Yuga 4247–4248
Holocene calendar 11147
Igbo calendar 147–148
Iranian calendar 525–526
Islamic calendar 541–542
Japanese calendar Kyūan 3
(久安3年)
Javanese calendar 1053–1054
Julian calendar 1147
MCXLVII
Korean calendar 3480
Minguo calendar 765 before ROC
民前765年
Nanakshahi calendar −321
Seleucid era 1458/1459 AG
Thai solar calendar 1689–1690
Tibetan calendar 阳火虎年
(male Fire-Tiger)
1273 or 892 or 120
     to 
阴火兔年
(female Fire-Rabbit)
1274 or 893 or 121

Year 1147 ( MCXLVII ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2015 and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Africa

Abd al-Mumin Caliph of the Almohad Empire

`Abd al Mu'min was a prominent member of the Almohad movement. As a leader of the Almohad Movement, he became the first Caliph of the Almohad Empire. Having put his predecessor's doctrinal blend of Zahirite jurisprudence and Ash'arite dogmatics into practice, Abd al-Mu'min's rule was the first to unite the whole coast from Egypt to the Atlantic Ocean along with Spain under one creed and one government. Between 1130 and his death in 1163, Abd al-Mu'min not only defeated the Almoravids, but extended his power over all northern Africa as far as Egypt, becoming Caliph of the Almohad Empire in 1147.

Ishaq ibn Ali was the eighth and last Almoravid king who reigned shortly in 1147.

Asia

October 25 is the 298th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 67 days remaining until the end of the year.

Battle of Dorylaeum (1147) bataille de 1147

The second Battle of Dorylaeum took place near Dorylaeum in October 1147, during the Second Crusade. It was not a single clash but consisted of a series of encounters over a number of days. The German crusader forces of Conrad III were defeated by the Seljuk Turks led by Sultan Mesud I.

Conrad III of Germany King of Germany

Conrad III was the first King of Germany of the Hohenstaufen dynasty. He was the son of Duke Frederick I of Swabia and Agnes, a daughter of the Salian Emperor Henry IV.

Europe

Eastern Europe
Wendish Crusade Saxons and Danes vs Slavs (Wends)

The Wendish Crusade was a military campaign in 1147, one of the Northern Crusades and a part of the Second Crusade, led primarily by the Kingdom of Germany within the Holy Roman Empire and directed against the Polabian Slavs. The Wends are made up of the Slavic tribes of Abrotrites, Rani, Liutizians, Wagarians, and Pomeranians who lived east of the River Elbe in present-day northeast Germany and Poland.

Polabian Slavs ethnic group

Polabian Slavs is a collective term applied to a number of Lechitic tribes who lived along the Elbe river in what is today Eastern Germany. The approximate territory stretched from the Baltic Sea in the north, the Saale and the Limes Saxoniae in the west, the Ore Mountains and the Western Sudetes in the south, and Poland in the east. They have also been known as Elbe Slavs or Wends. Their name derives from the Slavic po, meaning "by/next to/along", and the Slavic name for the Elbe.

Moscow Capital city of Russia

Moscow is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 13.2 million residents within the city limits, 17 million within the urban area and 20 million within the metropolitan area. Moscow is one of Russia's federal cities.

Southern Europe

July 1 is the 182nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 183 days remaining until the end of the year.

Siege of Lisbon siege

The Siege of Lisbon, from 1 July to 25 October 1147, was the military action that brought the city of Lisbon under definitive Portuguese control and expelled its Moorish overlords. The Siege of Lisbon was one of the few Christian victories of the Second Crusade—it was "the only success of the universal operation undertaken by the pilgrim army", i.e., the Second Crusade, according to the near contemporary historian Helmold, though others have questioned whether it was really part of that crusade. It is seen as a pivotal battle of the wider Reconquista.

Afonso I of Portugal King of Portugal

Afonso I, nicknamed the Conqueror, the Founder or the Great by the Portuguese, and El-Bortukali [in Arabic البرتقالي] and Ibn-Arrink [in Arabic ابن الرَّنك or ابن الرَنْق] by the Moors whom he fought, was the first King of Portugal. He achieved the independence of the southern part of the Kingdom of Galicia, the County of Portugal, from Galicia's overlord, the King of León, in 1139, establishing a new kingdom and doubling its area with the Reconquista, an objective that he pursued until his death in 1185, after forty-six years of wars against the Moors.

By topic

Religion

Dore Abbey Church in Herefordshire, England

Dore Abbey is a former Cistercian abbey in the village of Abbey Dore in the Golden Valley, Herefordshire, England. A large part of the original medieval building has been used since the 16th century as the parish church, with remaining parts either now ruined or no longer extant.

Hildegard of Bingen Medieval saint, prophetise, mystic and Doctor of Church

Hildegard of Bingen, also known as Saint Hildegard and Sibyl of the Rhine, was a German Benedictine abbess, writer, composer, philosopher, Christian mystic, visionary, and polymath. She is considered to be the founder of scientific natural history in Germany.

Convent Religious community

A convent is either a community of priests, religious brothers, religious sisters, or nuns; or the building used by the community, particularly in the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion.

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 1090s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1090, and ended on December 31, 1099.

1144 Year

Year 1144 (MCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1095 (MXCV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1122 (MCXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1120s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1120, and ended on December 31, 1129.

The 1140s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1140, and ended on December 31, 1149.

Year 1146 (MCXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1179 (MCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1120 Year

Year 1120 (MCXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1097 (MXCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1162 (MCLXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1160 (MCLX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1145 (MCXLV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1148 (MCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1175 (MCLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1178 (MCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1083 (MLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1094 (MXCIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1105 (MCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1108 (MCVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Bresc, Henri (2003). "La Sicile et l'espace libyen au Moyen Age" (PDF). Retrieved 17 January 2012.
  2. King John by Warren. Published by University of California Press in 1961. p. 67
  3. Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 109. ISBN   2-7068-1398-9.
  4. Picard C. (1997) La mer et les musulmans d'Occident au Moyen Age. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, pp.66
  5. Picard C. (1997) La mer et les musulmans d'Occident au Moyen Age. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, pp.64