1040

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1040 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1040
MXL
Ab urbe condita 1793
Armenian calendar 489
ԹՎ ՆՁԹ
Assyrian calendar 5790
Balinese saka calendar 961–962
Bengali calendar 447
Berber calendar 1990
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1584
Burmese calendar 402
Byzantine calendar 6548–6549
Chinese calendar 己卯(Earth  Rabbit)
3736 or 3676
     to 
庚辰年 (Metal  Dragon)
3737 or 3677
Coptic calendar 756–757
Discordian calendar 2206
Ethiopian calendar 1032–1033
Hebrew calendar 4800–4801
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1096–1097
 - Shaka Samvat 961–962
 - Kali Yuga 4140–4141
Holocene calendar 11040
Igbo calendar 40–41
Iranian calendar 418–419
Islamic calendar 431–432
Japanese calendar Chōryaku 4 / Chōkyū 1
(長久元年)
Javanese calendar 943–944
Julian calendar 1040
MXL
Korean calendar 3373
Minguo calendar 872 before ROC
民前872年
Nanakshahi calendar −428
Seleucid era 1351/1352 AG
Thai solar calendar 1582–1583
Tibetan calendar 阴土兔年
(female Earth-Rabbit)
1166 or 785 or 13
     to 
阳金龙年
(male Iron-Dragon)
1167 or 786 or 14
Artwork of the Battle of Dandanaqan Gaznaly-seljuk Dandanaqan.jpg
Artwork of the Battle of Dandanaqan

Year 1040 ( MXL ) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Tuesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are FE, such as the years 1884, 1924, 1952, 1980, 2008, 2036, 2064, 2092, and 2104 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1964, 1992, and 2020 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Tuesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this leap year occurs in June. Common years starting on Wednesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Europe

Nikephoros Dokeianos was the catepan of Italy from 1039 until 1040. He saw the early rebellion of Arduin the Lombard, but not its completion. He was killed at Ascoli Satriano early in 1040. With his death, the insurrection accelerated.

Catepanate of Italy

The Catepanateof Italy was a province of the Byzantine Empire, comprising mainland Italy south of a line drawn from Monte Gargano to the Gulf of Salerno. Amalfi and Naples, although north of that line, maintained allegiance to Constantinople through the catepan. The Italian region of Capitanata derives its name from the Catepanate.

Ascoli Satriano Comune in Apulia, Italy

Ascoli Satriano is a town and comune in the province of Foggia in the Apulia region of southeast Italy. It is located on the edge of a large plain in Northern Apulia known as the Tavoliere delle Puglie.

England

March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 289 days remain until the end of the year.

Harold Harefoot King of England

Harold I, also known as Harold Harefoot, was King of England from 1035 to 1040. Harold's nickname "Harefoot" is first recorded as "Harefoh" or "Harefah" in the twelfth century in the history of Ely Abbey, and according to late medieval chroniclers it meant that he was fleet of foot.

Oxford City and non-metropolitan district in England

Oxford is a university city in south central England and the county town of Oxfordshire. With a population of approximately 155,000, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom, with one of the fastest growing populations in the UK, and it remains the most ethnically diverse area in Oxfordshire county. The city is 51 miles (82 km) from London, 61 miles (98 km) from Bristol, 59 miles (95 km) from Southampton, 57 miles (92 km) from Birmingham and 24 miles (39 km) from Reading.

Arabian Empire

May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 222 days remain until the end of the year.

Battle of Dandanaqan Part of the Seljuk-Ghaznavid Wars

The Battle of Dandanaqan was fought in 1040 between the Seljuqs and the Ghaznavid Empire. The battle ended with a Seljuq victory and brought down the Ghaznavid domination in the Khorasan.

Seljuq dynasty was an Oghuz Turk Sunni Muslim dynasty that gradually became a Persianate society

The Seljuq dynasty, or Seljuqs, was an Oghuz Turk Sunni Muslim dynasty that gradually became a Persianate society and contributed to the Turco-Persian tradition in the medieval West and Central Asia. The Seljuqs established both the Seljuk Empire and the Sultanate of Rum, which at their heights stretched from Iran to Anatolia, and were targets of the First Crusade.

By topic

Religion

Weihenstephan Abbey monastery

Weihenstephan Abbey was a Benedictine monastery in Weihenstephan, now part of the district of Freising, in Bavaria, Germany. Brauerei Weihenstephan, located at the monastery site since at least 1040, is said to be the world's oldest continuously operating brewery.

Germany Federal parliamentary republic in central-western Europe

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central and Western Europe, lying between the Baltic and North Seas to the north, and the Alps, Lake Constance and the High Rhine to the south. It borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, France to the southwest, and Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west.

Brewery business that makes and sells beer

A brewery or brewing company is a business that makes and sells beer. The place at which beer is commercially made is either called a brewery or a beerhouse, where distinct sets of brewing equipment are called plant. The commercial brewing of beer has taken place since at least 2500 BC; in ancient Mesopotamia, brewers derived social sanction and divine protection from the goddess Ninkasi. Brewing was initially a cottage industry, with production taking place at home; by the ninth century monasteries and farms would produce beer on a larger scale, selling the excess; and by the eleventh and twelfth centuries larger, dedicated breweries with eight to ten workers were being built.

Births

February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 312 days remain until the end of the year.

Rashi French rabbi and commentator

Shlomo Yitzchaki, today generally known by the acronym Rashi, was a medieval French rabbi and author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud and commentary on the Tanakh. Acclaimed for his ability to present the basic meaning of the text in a concise and lucid fashion, Rashi appeals to both learned scholars and beginner students, and his works remain a centerpiece of contemporary Jewish study. His commentary on the Talmud, which covers nearly all of the Babylonian Talmud, has been included in every edition of the Talmud since its first printing by Daniel Bomberg in the 1520s. His commentary on Tanakh—especially on the Chumash — serves as the basis for more than 300 "supercommentaries" which analyze Rashi's choice of language and citations, penned by some of the greatest names in rabbinic literature.

In Judaism, a rabbi is a teacher of Torah. The basic form of the rabbi developed in the Pharisaic and Talmudic era, when learned teachers assembled to codify Judaism's written and oral laws. The first sage for whom the Mishnah uses the title of rabbi was Yohanan ben Zakkai, active in the early-to-mid first century CE. In more recent centuries, the duties of a rabbi became increasingly influenced by the duties of the Protestant Christian minister, hence the title "pulpit rabbis", and in 19th-century Germany and the United States rabbinic activities including sermons, pastoral counseling, and representing the community to the outside, all increased in importance.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

Year 1000 (M) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. In the proleptic Gregorian calendar, it was a non-leap century year starting on Wednesday. It was also the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the 1st millennium of the Dionysian era ending on December 31st, but the first year of the 1000s decade.

The 1040s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1040, and ended on December 31, 1049.

1079 Year

Year 1079 (MLXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1001 (MI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. It is the first year of the 11th century and the 2nd millennium.

1002 Year

Year 1002 (MII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

961 Year

Year 961 (CMLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1015 Year

Year in topic Year 1015 (MXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1018 Year

Year 1018 (MXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

962 Year

Year 962 (CMLXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1050 Year

Year 1050 (ML) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1060 Year

Year 1060 (MLX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1070 (MLXX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

950 Year

Year 950 (CML) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1022 Year

Year 1022 (MXXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

997 Year

Year 997 (CMXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1032 Year

Year 1032 (MXXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1090 (MXC) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

985 Year

Year 985 (CMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

960 Year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

References