1035

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1035 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1035
MXXXV
Ab urbe condita 1788
Armenian calendar 484
ԹՎ ՆՁԴ
Assyrian calendar 5785
Balinese saka calendar 956–957
Bengali calendar 442
Berber calendar 1985
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1579
Burmese calendar 397
Byzantine calendar 6543–6544
Chinese calendar 甲戌(Wood  Dog)
3731 or 3671
     to 
乙亥年 (Wood  Pig)
3732 or 3672
Coptic calendar 751–752
Discordian calendar 2201
Ethiopian calendar 1027–1028
Hebrew calendar 4795–4796
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1091–1092
 - Shaka Samvat 956–957
 - Kali Yuga 4135–4136
Holocene calendar 11035
Igbo calendar 35–36
Iranian calendar 413–414
Islamic calendar 426–427
Japanese calendar Chōgen 8
(長元8年)
Javanese calendar 938–939
Julian calendar 1035
MXXXV
Korean calendar 3368
Minguo calendar 877 before ROC
民前877年
Nanakshahi calendar −433
Seleucid era 1346/1347 AG
Thai solar calendar 1577–1578
Tibetan calendar 阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1161 or 780 or 8
     to 
阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
1162 or 781 or 9
King Harold I of England (r. 1035-1040) Harold Harefoot - MS Royal 14 B VI.jpg
King Harold I of England (r. 1035–1040)

Year 1035 ( MXXXV ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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The 1000s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1000, and ended on December 31, 1009.

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The 1040s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1040, and ended on December 31, 1049.

The 1070s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1070, and ended on December 31, 1079.

The 1060s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1060, and ended on December 31, 1069.

The 930s decade ran from January 1, 930, to December 31, 939.

The 990s decade ran from January 1, 990, to December 31, 999.

1002 Calendar year

Year 1002 (MII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1016 Calendar year

Year 1016 (MXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1028 Calendar year

Year 1028 (MXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1017 Calendar year

Year 1017 (MXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1070 (MLXX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1070th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 70th year of the 2nd millennium, the 70th year of the 11th century, and the 1st year of the 1070s decade.

The 1010s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1010, and ended on December 31, 1019.

The 1030s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1030, and ended on December 31, 1039.

1027 Calendar year

Year 1027 (MXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1042 Calendar year

Year 1042 (MXLII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1064 Calendar year

Year 1064 (MLXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

960 Calendar year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

House of Knýtlinga ruling royal house in Middle Age Scandinavia and England

The Danish House of Knýtlinga was a ruling royal house in Middle Age Scandinavia and England. Its most famous king was Cnut the Great, who gave his name to this dynasty. Other notable members were Cnut's father Sweyn Forkbeard, grandfather Harald Bluetooth, and sons Harthacnut, Harold Harefoot, and Svein Knutsson. It has also been called the House of Canute, the House of Denmark, the House of Gorm, or the Jelling dynasty.

References

  1. The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis, and Robert of Torigni, Ed. & Trans. Elizabeth M.C. van Houts, Vol. I (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1992), pp. 80-85.
  2. Benvenuti, Gino (1985). Le Repubbliche Marinare. Amalfi, Pisa, Genova e Venezia. Rome: Newton & Compton Editori. p. 42. ISBN   88-8289-529-7.