996

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
996 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 996
CMXCVI
Ab urbe condita 1749
Armenian calendar 445
ԹՎ ՆԽԵ
Assyrian calendar 5746
Balinese saka calendar 917–918
Bengali calendar 403
Berber calendar 1946
Buddhist calendar 1540
Burmese calendar 358
Byzantine calendar 6504–6505
Chinese calendar 乙未(Wood  Goat)
3692 or 3632
     to 
丙申年 (Fire  Monkey)
3693 or 3633
Coptic calendar 712–713
Discordian calendar 2162
Ethiopian calendar 988–989
Hebrew calendar 4756–4757
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1052–1053
 - Shaka Samvat 917–918
 - Kali Yuga 4096–4097
Holocene calendar 10996
Iranian calendar 374–375
Islamic calendar 385–386
Japanese calendar Chōtoku 2
(長徳2年)
Javanese calendar 897–898
Julian calendar 996
CMXCVI
Korean calendar 3329
Minguo calendar 916 before ROC
民前916年
Nanakshahi calendar −472
Seleucid era 1307/1308 AG
Thai solar calendar 1538–1539
Tibetan calendar 阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
1122 or 741 or −31
     to 
阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1123 or 742 or −30
Otto III is crowned Holy Roman Emperor. Meister der Reichenauer Schule 002.jpg
Otto III is crowned Holy Roman Emperor.

Year 996 (CMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

By place

Europe

Africa

China

By topic

Religion

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

1000s (decade)

The 1000s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1000, and ended on December 31, 1009.

The 970s decade ran from January 1, 970, to December 31, 979.

The 980s decade ran from January 1, 980, to December 31, 989.

The 990s decade ran from January 1, 990, to December 31, 999.

955 Calendar year

Year 955 (CMLV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

991 Calendar year

Year 991 (CMXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1009 Calendar year

Year 1009 (MIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1011 Calendar year

Year 1011 (MXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian Calendar.

The 1010s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1010, and ended on December 31, 1019.

985 Calendar year

Year 985 (CMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

975 Calendar year

Year 975 (CMLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

902 Calendar year

Year 902 (CMII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

974 Calendar year

Year 974 (CMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Fatimid Caliphate Arab-Shia Islamic caliphate

The Fatimid Caliphate was an Ismaili Shia caliphate of the 10th to the 12th centuries CE. Spanning a large area of North Africa, it ranged from the Red Sea in the east to the Atlantic Ocean in the west. The Fatimids, a dynasty of Arab origin, trace their ancestry to Muhammad's daughter Fatima and her husband ‘Ali b. Abi Talib, the first Shi‘ite imam. The Fatimids were acknowledged as the rightful imams by different Isma‘ili communities, but also in many other Muslim lands, including Persia and the adjacent regions. Originating during the Abbasid Caliphate, the Fatimids conquered Tunisia and established the city of "Al Mahdia". The Shiʿite dynasty ruled territories across the Mediterranean coast of Africa and ultimately made Egypt the center of the caliphate. At its height, the caliphate included – in addition to Egypt – varying areas of the Maghreb, Sudan, Sicily, the Levant, and the Hijaz.

The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029

Orestes Hieremias, also called Ariston, was the Melkite Patriarch of Jerusalem from 15 January 986 until his death on 3 February 1006.

Abū'l-Futūh Barjawān al-Ustādh was a Shia Muslim eunuch palace official who became the prime minister (wāsiṭa) and de facto regent of the Fatimid Caliphate in October 997, and held the position until his assassination. Of obscure origin, Barjawan became the tutor of heir-apparent al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, who became caliph in 996 with the death of al-Aziz Billah. On al-Hakim's coronation, power was seized by some Shia soldiers, who tried to monopolize government and clashed with their rivals, the Circassian Turkic slave-soldiers. Allied with disaffected the Shia Muslim soldiers, Barjawan was able to seize the reins of government for himself in 997. His tenure was marked by a successful balancing act between the Berbers and the Turks, as well as the rise of men of diverse backgrounds, promoted under his patronage. Militarily, Barjawan was successful in restoring order to the Fatimids' restive Levantine and Libyan provinces, and set the stage for an enduring truce with the Byzantine Empire. The concentration of power in his hands and his overbearing attitude alienated al-Hakim, however, who ordered him assassinated and thereafter assumed the governance of the caliphate himself.

Aḥmad ibn Ibrāhı̄m al-Nı̄sābūrı̄ or al-Naysābūrı̄ was an Isma'ili scholar from Nishapur, who entered the service of the Fatimid caliphs al-Aziz Billah and al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah in Cairo. His life is relatively obscure, and is known chiefly from references in his works. Among them three stand out as highly important for Fatimid and Isma'ili history: the Istitār al-imām, a historical work that offers unique information on the early history of the Isma'ili movement and the rise of the Fatimid Caliphate, the Risāla al-mūjaza, which contains an exposition on the qualities and duties of the ideal Isma'ili missionary, and the Ithbāt al-imāma, an influential analysis of Isma'ili conceptions of the imamate, combining rationalist philosophical argument with Islamic theology.

References

  1. François Neveux, A Brief History of the Normans (Constable and Robinson, 2008) p. 74.
  2. Gil, Moshe (1997). A History of Palestine, 634–1099, pp. 369–370. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0-521-59984-9.