922

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
922 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 922
CMXXII
Ab urbe condita 1675
Armenian calendar 371
ԹՎ ՅՀԱ
Assyrian calendar 5672
Balinese saka calendar 843–844
Bengali calendar 329
Berber calendar 1872
Buddhist calendar 1466
Burmese calendar 284
Byzantine calendar 6430–6431
Chinese calendar 辛巳(Metal  Snake)
3618 or 3558
     to 
壬午年 (Water  Horse)
3619 or 3559
Coptic calendar 638–639
Discordian calendar 2088
Ethiopian calendar 914–915
Hebrew calendar 4682–4683
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 978–979
 - Shaka Samvat 843–844
 - Kali Yuga 4022–4023
Holocene calendar 10922
Iranian calendar 300–301
Islamic calendar 309–310
Japanese calendar Engi 22
(延喜22年)
Javanese calendar 821–822
Julian calendar 922
CMXXII
Korean calendar 3255
Minguo calendar 990 before ROC
民前990年
Nanakshahi calendar −546
Seleucid era 1233/1234 AG
Thai solar calendar 1464–1465
Tibetan calendar 阴金蛇年
(female Iron-Snake)
1048 or 667 or −105
     to 
阳水马年
(male Water-Horse)
1049 or 668 or −104

Year 922 ( CMXXII ) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is F. The current year, 2019, is a common year starting on Tuesday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 2013 and the next such year will be 2030, or, likewise, 2014 and 2025 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Leap years starting on Monday share this characteristic. From July of the year that precedes this year until September in this type of year is the longest period that occurs without a Friday the 13th. Leap years starting on Saturday share this characteristic, from August of the common year that precedes it to October in that type of year.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Byzantine Empire

  • Summer Battle of Constantinople: Emperor Romanos I sends Byzantine troops to repel another Bulgarian raid at the outskirts of Constantinople. The Byzantines storm the Bulgarian camp, but are defeated when they are confronted by the main Bulgarian forces. Having won the battle, the Bulgarians lack the maritime power to conduct a successful siege of Constantinople. [1]

The Battle of Constantinople was fought in June 922 at the outskirts of the capital of the Byzantine Empire, Constantinople, between the forces of the First Bulgarian Empire and the Byzantines during the Byzantine–Bulgarian war of 913–927. In the summer the Byzantine Emperor Romanos I Lekapenos sent troops under the commander Saktikios to repel another Bulgarian raid at the outskirts of the Byzantine capital. The Byzantines stormed the Bulgarian camp but were defeated when they confronted the main Bulgarian forces. During his flight from the battlefield Saktikios was mortally wounded and died the following night.

Romanos I Lekapenos Byzantine emperor

Romanos I Lekapenos or Lakapenos, Latinized as Romanus I Lecapenus, was an Armenian who became a Byzantine naval commander and reigned as Byzantine Emperor from 920 until his deposition on December 16, 944.

Byzantine Empire Roman Empire during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople. It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453. During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe. Both the terms "Byzantine Empire" and "Eastern Roman Empire" are historiographical exonyms; its citizens continued to refer to their empire simply as the Roman Empire, or Romania (Ῥωμανία), and to themselves as "Romans".

Europe

Nobility privileged social class

Nobility is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary, and vary by country and era. The Medieval chivalric motto "noblesse oblige", meaning literally "nobility obligates", explains that privileges carry a lifelong obligation of duty to uphold various social responsibilities of, e.g., honorable behavior, customary service, or leadership roles or positions, that lives on by a familial or kinship bond.

Charles the Simple King of West Francia

Charles III, called the Simple or the Straightforward, was the King of West Francia from 898 until 922 and the King of Lotharingia from 911 until 919–23. He was a member of the Carolingian dynasty.

Lotharingia former medieval kingdom (855-959)

Lotharingia was a medieval successor kingdom of the Carolingian Empire, comprising the present-day Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany), Rhineland-Palatinate (Germany), Saarland (Germany), and Lorraine (France). It was named after King Lothair II who received this territory after the kingdom of Middle Francia of his father Lothair I was divided among his sons in 855.

By topic

Religion

March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 280 days remaining until the end of the year.

Mansur Al-Hallaj Persian mystic, revolutionary writer and teacher of Sufism

Mansur al-Hallaj was a Persian mystic, poet and teacher of Sufism. He is best known for his saying: "I am the Truth", which many saw as a claim to divinity, while others interpreted it as an instance of annihilation of the ego which allows God to speak through the individual. Al-Hallaj gained a wide following as a preacher before he became implicated in power struggles of the Abbasid court and was executed after a long period of confinement on religious and political charges. Although most of his Sufi contemporaries disapproved of his actions, Hallaj later became a major figure in the Sufi tradition.

Mysticism Practice of religious experiences during alternate states of consciousness

Mysticism is the practice of religious ecstasies, together with whatever ideologies, ethics, rites, myths, legends, and magic may be related to them. It may also refer to the attainment of insight in ultimate or hidden truths, and to human transformation supported by various practices and experiences.

Births

Hedwig of Nordgau Countess of Luxembourg

Hedwig of Nordgau was the wife of Siegfried of Luxembourg, first count of Luxembourg and founder of the country. They were married c. 950. She was of Saxon origin but her parentage is not known for sure. Some sources claim that she was connected to the family of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor. Described as "saintly" herself, Hedwig of Nordgau was the mother of Saint Cunigunde of Luxembourg, the seventh of eleven children from her marriage to Siegfried.

County of Luxemburg county in Western Europe during the Middle Ages

The County of Luxemburg was a State of the Holy Roman Empire. It arose from medieval Lucilinburhuc Castle in the present-day City of Luxembourg, purchased by Count Siegfried in 963. His descendants of the Ardennes-Verdun dynasty (Wigeriche) began to call themselves Counts of Luxembourg from the 11th century onwards. The House of Luxembourg, a cadet branch of the Dukes of Limburg, became one of the most important political forces of the 14th century, contending with the House of Habsburg for supremacy in Central Europe.

ibn Abi Zayd (922–996), fully Abu Muhammad 'Abd allah ibn Abi Zayd 'Abd al-Rahman al nafzawi ibn Abi Zayd al-Qayrawani, was a Maliki scholar from Kairouan in Tunisia. His best known work is Al-Risala or the Epistle, an instructional book devoted to the education of young children. He was a member of the Nafzawah Berber tribe and lived in Kairouan. In addition, he served as the Imam of one of the mosques' that followed the Maliki School tradition. Al-Qayrawani was the leader of the Maliki school in Kairouan and was also an active proponent of salafiyyah thought.

Deaths

February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 314 days remaining until the end of the year.

Theodora was a Byzantine Empress consort by marriage to Romanos I Lekapenos.

May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 222 days remaining until the end of the year.

Related Research Articles

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

The 920s decade ran from January 1, 920, to December 31, 929.

The 950s decade ran from January 1, 950, to December 31, 959.

858 Year

Year 858 (DCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

921 Year

Year 921 (CMXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

962 Year

Year 962 (CMLXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

923 Year

Year 923 (CMXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

952 Year

Year 952 (CMLII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

926 Year

Year 926 (CMXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

950 Year

Year 950 (CML) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

956 Year

Year 956 (CMLVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

924 Year

Year 924 (CMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

925 Year

Year 925 (CMXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

905 Year

Year 905 (CMV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

894 Year

Year 894 (DCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

933 Year

Year 933 (CMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

945 Year

Year 945 (CMXLV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

937 Year

Year 937 (CMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

944 Year

Year 944 (CMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

888 Year

Year 888 (DCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. "Synopsis of Histories by John Skylitzes" in GIBI, vol. VI, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, p. 252
  2. Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 379. ISBN   978-0-521-36447-8.
  3. Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 340. ISBN   978-0-521-36447-8.