945

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
945 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 945
CMXLV
Ab urbe condita 1698
Armenian calendar 394
ԹՎ ՅՂԴ
Assyrian calendar 5695
Balinese saka calendar 866–867
Bengali calendar 352
Berber calendar 1895
Buddhist calendar 1489
Burmese calendar 307
Byzantine calendar 6453–6454
Chinese calendar 甲辰(Wood  Dragon)
3641 or 3581
     to 
乙巳年 (Wood  Snake)
3642 or 3582
Coptic calendar 661–662
Discordian calendar 2111
Ethiopian calendar 937–938
Hebrew calendar 4705–4706
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1001–1002
 - Shaka Samvat 866–867
 - Kali Yuga 4045–4046
Holocene calendar 10945
Iranian calendar 323–324
Islamic calendar 333–334
Japanese calendar Tengyō 8
(天慶8年)
Javanese calendar 845–846
Julian calendar 945
CMXLV
Korean calendar 3278
Minguo calendar 967 before ROC
民前967年
Nanakshahi calendar −523
Seleucid era 1256/1257 AG
Thai solar calendar 1487–1488
Tibetan calendar 阳木龙年
(male Wood-Dragon)
1071 or 690 or −82
     to 
阴木蛇年
(female Wood-Snake)
1072 or 691 or −81
Igor I collects tribute from the Drevlians. Knyaz Igor in 945 by Lebedev.jpg
Igor I collects tribute from the Drevlians.

Year 945 ( CMXLV ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2015 and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Byzantine Empire

January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 338 days remaining until the end of the year.

Stephen Lekapenos Byzantine emperor

Stephen Lekapenos or Lecapenus was the second son of the Byzantine emperor Romanos I Lekapenos, and co-emperor from 924 to 945. With his younger brother Constantine, he deposed Romanos I in December 944, but was overthrown and exiled by the legitimate emperor Constantine VII a few weeks later. Stephen lived out his life in exile on the island of Lesbos, where he died on Easter 963.

Constantine Lekapenos Byzantine emperor

Constantine Lekapenos or Lecapenus was the third son of the Byzantine emperor Romanos I Lekapenos, and co-emperor from 924 to 945. With his elder brother Stephen, he deposed Romanos I in December 944, but was overthrown and exiled by the legitimate emperor Constantine VII a few weeks later. Constantine was exiled to the island of Samothrace, where he was killed while attempting to escape sometime between 946 and 948.

Europe

Berengar II of Italy Italian monarch

Berengar II was the King of Italy from 950 until his deposition in 961. He was a scion of the Anscarid and Unruoching dynasties, and was named after his maternal grandfather, Berengar I. He succeeded his father as Margrave of Ivrea around 923, and after 940 led the aristocratic opposition to Kings Hugh and Lothair II. In 950 he succeeded the latter and had his son, Adalbert crowned as his co-ruler. In 952 he recognised the suzerainty of Otto I of Germany, but he later joined a revolt against him. In 960 he invaded the Papal States, and the next year his kingdom was conquered by Otto. Berengar remained at large until his surrender in 964. He died imprisoned in Germany two years later.

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country in Southern and Western Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates San Marino and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in Southern Europe.

Lombardy Region of Italy

Lombardy is one of the twenty administrative regions of Italy, in the northwest of the country, with an area of 23,844 square kilometres (9,206 sq mi). About 10 million people, forming one-sixth of Italy's population, live in Lombardy and about a fifth of Italy's GDP is produced in the region, making it the most populous and richest region in the country and one of the richest regions in Europe. Milan, Lombardy's capital, is the second-largest city and the largest metropolitan area in Italy.

England

Edmund I Anglo Saxon monarch

Edmund I was King of the English from 939 until his death. His epithets include the Elder, the Deed-doer, the Just, and the Magnificent.

Kingdom of Strathclyde medieval kingdom in northern Britain

Strathclyde, originally Cumbric: Ystrad Clud or Alclud, was one of the early medieval kingdoms of the Britons in Hen Ogledd, the Brythonic-speaking parts of what is now southern Scotland and northern England. The kingdom developed during the post-Roman period. It is also known as Alt Clut, a Brittonic term for Dumbarton Castle, the medieval capital of the region. It may have had its origins with the Brythonic Damnonii people of Ptolemy's Geography.

Malcolm I of Scotland Scottish king

Máel Coluim mac Domnaill was king of Scots, becoming king when his cousin Causantín mac Áeda abdicated to become a monk. He was the son of Domnall mac Causantín.

Arabian Empire

Sayf al-Dawla Muslim general

Ali ibn Abu'l-Hayja 'Abdallah ibn Hamdan ibn al-Harith al-Taghlibi, more commonly known simply by his laqab of Sayf al-Dawla, was the founder of the Emirate of Aleppo, encompassing most of northern Syria and parts of western Jazira, and the brother of al-Hasan ibn Abdallah ibn Hamdan.

Abū Bakr Muḥammad ibn Ṭughj ibn Juff ibn Yiltakīn ibn Fūrān ibn Fūrī ibn Khāqān, better known by the title al-Ikhshīd after 939, was an Abbasid commander and governor who became the autonomous ruler of Egypt and parts of Syria from 935 until his death in 946. He was the founder of the Sunni Ikhshidid dynasty, which ruled the region until the Fatimid conquest of 969.

Qinnasrin archaeological site

Qinnasrin, also known by numerous other romanizations and originally known as Chalcis-on-Belus, was a historical town in northern Syria. The town was situated 25 km south west of Aleppo on the west bank of the Queiq River and was connected to Aleppo with a major road during Roman times.

China

Southern Tang Former country in Chinas 5 dynasties and 10 kingdoms period

Southern Tang, later known as Jiangnan (江南), was one of the Ten Kingdoms in Southern China created following the Tang dynasty from 937–976. Southern Tang replaced the Wu empire when Li Bian deposed the emperor Yang Pu.

Li Jing (Southern Tang) ruler of the Southern Tang Kingdom in ancient China

Li Jing, originally Xu Jingtong (徐景通), briefly Xu Jing (徐璟) in 937–939, courtesy name Boyu (伯玉), also known by his temple name Yuanzong (元宗), was the second ruler of imperial China's Southern Tang state during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. He reigned his state from 943 until his death.

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Related Research Articles

Year 1000 (M) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. In the proleptic Gregorian calendar, it was a non-leap century year starting on Wednesday. It was also the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the 1st millennium of the Dionysian era ending on December 31st, but the first year of the 1000s decade.

The 860s decade ran from January 1, 860, to December 31, 869.

The 900s decade ran from January 1, 900, to December 31, 909.

The 920s decade ran from January 1, 920, to December 31, 929.

The 940s decade ran from January 1, 940, to December 31, 949.

The 950s decade ran from January 1, 950, to December 31, 959.

The 960s decade ran from January 1, 960, to December 31, 969.

The 970s decade ran from January 1, 970, to December 31, 979.

The 980s decade ran from January 1, 980, to December 31, 989.

961 Year

Year 961 (CMLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

962 Year

Year 962 (CMLXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

923 Year

Year 923 (CMXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

952 Year

Year 952 (CMLII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

950 Year

Year 950 (CML) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 922 (CMXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

965 Year

Year 965 (CMLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

960 Year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

956 Year

Year 956 (CMLVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

905 Year

Year 905 (CMV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

944 Year

Year 944 (CMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 509. ISBN   978-0-521-36447-8.
  2. Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 385. ISBN   978-0-521-36447-8.