941

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
941 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 941
CMXLI
Ab urbe condita 1694
Armenian calendar 390
ԹՎ ՅՂ
Assyrian calendar 5691
Balinese saka calendar 862–863
Bengali calendar 348
Berber calendar 1891
Buddhist calendar 1485
Burmese calendar 303
Byzantine calendar 6449–6450
Chinese calendar 庚子(Metal  Rat)
3637 or 3577
     to 
辛丑年 (Metal  Ox)
3638 or 3578
Coptic calendar 657–658
Discordian calendar 2107
Ethiopian calendar 933–934
Hebrew calendar 4701–4702
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 997–998
 - Shaka Samvat 862–863
 - Kali Yuga 4041–4042
Holocene calendar 10941
Iranian calendar 319–320
Islamic calendar 329–330
Japanese calendar Tengyō 4
(天慶4年)
Javanese calendar 841–842
Julian calendar 941
CMXLI
Korean calendar 3274
Minguo calendar 971 before ROC
民前971年
Nanakshahi calendar −527
Seleucid era 1252/1253 AG
Thai solar calendar 1483–1484
Tibetan calendar 阳金鼠年
(male Iron-Rat)
1067 or 686 or −86
     to 
阴金牛年
(female Iron-Ox)
1068 or 687 or −85
The Byzantines repel the Russian attack at Constantinople, using ships with Greek fire. Byzantines repel the Russian attack of 941.jpg
The Byzantines repel the Russian attack at Constantinople, using ships with Greek fire.

Year 941 ( CMXLI ) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Friday is any non-leap year that begins on Friday, 1 January, and ends on Friday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is C. The most recent year of such kind was 2010 and the next one will be 2021 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2011 and 2022 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 2100, will also be a common year starting on Friday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in August. Leap years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another one in February.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Abbasid Caliphate

Palace of the Golden Gate

The Palace of the Golden Gate or Palace of the Green Dome was the official caliphal residence in Baghdad during the early Abbasid Caliphate.

Baghdad Capital of Iraq

Baghdad is the capital of Iraq. The population of Baghdad, as of 2016, is approximately 8,765,000, making it the largest city in Iraq, the second largest city in the Arab world, and the second largest city in Western Asia.

Byzantine Empire

Rus–Byzantine War (941)

The Rus'–Byzantine War of 941 took place during the reign of Igor of Kiev. The Khazar Correspondence reveals that the campaign was instigated by the Khazars, who wished revenge on the Byzantines after the persecutions of the Jews undertaken by Emperor Romanus I Lecapenus. The first naval attack was driven off and followed by another, successful offensive in 944. The outcome was the Rus'–Byzantine Treaty of 945.

Kievan Rus Former federation of East Slavic and Finnic tribes

Kievan Rus' was a loose federation of East Slavic and Finnic peoples in Europe from the late 9th to the mid-13th century, under the reign of the Varangian Rurik dynasty. The modern nations of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine all claim Kievan Rus' as their cultural ancestors, with Belarus and Russia deriving their names from it.

Pechenegs historical ethnical group

The Pechenegs or Patzinaks were a semi-nomadic Turkic people from Central Asia speaking the Pecheneg language which belonged to the Oghuz branch of Turkic language family.

Europe

Henry I, Duke of Bavaria 921–955, Duke of Bavaria

Henry I, a member of the German royal Ottonian dynasty, was Duke of Bavaria from 948 until his death.

Duchy of Bavaria duchy

The Duchy of Bavaria was a frontier region in the southeastern part of the Merovingian kingdom from the sixth through the eighth century. It was settled by Bavarian tribes and ruled by dukes (duces) under Frankish overlordship. A new duchy was created from this area during the decline of the Carolingian Empire in the late ninth century. It became one of the stem duchies of the East Frankish realm which evolved as the Kingdom of Germany and the Holy Roman Empire.

Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor German king and first emperor of the Ottonian empire

Otto I, traditionally known as Otto the Great, was German king from 936 and Holy Roman Emperor from 962 until his death in 973. He was the oldest son of Henry I the Fowler and Matilda.

By topic

Religion

Oda, called the Good or the Severe, was a 10th-century Archbishop of Canterbury in England. The son of a Danish invader, Oda became Bishop of Ramsbury before 928. A number of stories were told about his actions both prior to becoming and while a bishop, but few of these incidents are recorded in contemporary accounts. After being named to Canterbury in 941, Oda was instrumental in crafting royal legislation as well as involved in providing rules for his clergy. Oda was also involved in the efforts to reform religious life in England. He died in 958 and legendary tales afterwards were ascribed to him. Later he came to be regarded as a saint, and a hagiography was written in the late 11th or early 12th century.

Diocese of Canterbury Church of Englands diocese covering eastern Kent

The Diocese of Canterbury is a Church of England diocese covering eastern Kent which was founded by St. Augustine of Canterbury in 597. The diocese is centred on Canterbury Cathedral and is the oldest see of the Church of England.

Kingdom of England historic sovereign kingdom on the British Isles (927–1649; 1660–1707)

The Kingdom of England was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from 927, when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Births

Brian Boru High King of Ireland

Brian Boru was an Irish king who ended the domination of the High Kingship of Ireland by the Uí Néill. Building on the achievements of his father, Cennétig mac Lorcain, and especially his elder brother, Mathgamain, Brian first made himself King of Munster, then subjugated Leinster, eventually becoming High King of Ireland. He was the founder of the O'Brien dynasty.

High King of Ireland

The High Kings of Ireland were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland for centuries.

1014 Year

Year in topic Year 1014 (MXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 630s decade ran from January 1, 630, to December 31, 639.

The 940s decade ran from January 1, 940, to December 31, 949.

847 Year

Year 847 (DCCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

740 Year

Year 740 (DCCXL) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 740 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

899 Year

Year 899 (DCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

829 Year

Year 829 (DCCCXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

861 Year

Year 861 (DCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

863 Year

Year 863 (DCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

727 Year

Year 727 (DCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 727 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

619 Year

Year 619 (DCXIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 619 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

670 Year

Year 670 (DCLXX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 670 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

923 Year

Year 923 (CMXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

870 Year

Year 870 (DCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

595 Year

Year 595 (DXCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 595 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

580 Year

Year 580 (DLXXX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 580 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

971 Year

Year 971 (CMLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

882 Year

Year 882 (DCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

936 Year

Year 936 (CMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

945 Year

Year 945 (CMXLV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

944 Year

Year 944 (CMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Sources give varying figures for the size of the Russian fleet. The number 10,000 ships appears in the Primary Chronicle and in Greek sources, some of which put the figure as high as 15,000 ships. Liutprand of Cremona wrote that the fleet numbered only 1,000 ships; Liutprand's report is based on the account of his step-father who witnessed the attack while serving as envoy in Constantinople. Modern historians find the latter estimate to be the most credible. Runciman (1988), p. 111.
  2. Lynch, Michael (ed.). The Oxford companion to Scottish history. Oxford University Press. p. 106. ISBN   9780199693054.