884

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
884 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 884
DCCCLXXXIV
Ab urbe condita 1637
Armenian calendar 333
ԹՎ ՅԼԳ
Assyrian calendar 5634
Balinese saka calendar 805–806
Bengali calendar 291
Berber calendar 1834
Buddhist calendar 1428
Burmese calendar 246
Byzantine calendar 6392–6393
Chinese calendar 癸卯(Water  Rabbit)
3580 or 3520
     to 
甲辰年 (Wood  Dragon)
3581 or 3521
Coptic calendar 600–601
Discordian calendar 2050
Ethiopian calendar 876–877
Hebrew calendar 4644–4645
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 940–941
 - Shaka Samvat 805–806
 - Kali Yuga 3984–3985
Holocene calendar 10884
Iranian calendar 262–263
Islamic calendar 270–271
Japanese calendar Gangyō 8
(元慶8年)
Javanese calendar 782–783
Julian calendar 884
DCCCLXXXIV
Korean calendar 3217
Minguo calendar 1028 before ROC
民前1028年
Nanakshahi calendar −584
Seleucid era 1195/1196 AG
Thai solar calendar 1426–1427
Tibetan calendar 阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
1010 or 629 or −143
     to 
阳木龙年
(male Wood-Dragon)
1011 or 630 or −142
Pope Adrian III (or Hadrian III) Pope Adrian III.jpg
Pope Adrian III (or Hadrian III)

Year 884 ( DCCCLXXXIV ) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year starting on Wednesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are ED, such as the years 1908, 1936, 1964, 1992, 2020, 2048, 2076, and 2116 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2004 and 2032 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in March and November. Common years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another in February.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Events

By place

Europe

March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 305 days remaining until the end of the year.

Diego Rodríguez Porcelos Spanish noble

Diego Rodríguez Porcelos, was the second Count of Castile, succeeding his father Rodrigo. He did not govern Álava, however, as his father had done, since this responsibility fell on Count Vela Jiménez. Between 882 and 884 and under the mandate of King Alfonso III of Asturias, he was in charge of the repoblación of Burgos and Ubierna.

Kingdom of Castile former country

The Kingdom of Castile was a large and powerful state located on the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages. Its name comes from the host of castles constructed in the region. It began in the 9th century as the County of Castile, an eastern frontier lordship of the Kingdom of León. During the 10th century its counts increased their autonomy, but it was not until 1065 that it was separated from León and became a kingdom in its own right. Between 1072 and 1157 it was again united with León, and after 1230 this union became permanent. Throughout this period the Castilian kings made extensive conquests in southern Iberia at the expense of the Islamic principalities. Castile and León, with their southern acquisitions, came to be known collectively as the Crown of Castile, a term that also came to encompass overseas expansion.

Britain

Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians became ruler of English Mercia shortly after the death of its last king, Ceolwulf II in 879. His rule was confined to the western half, as eastern Mercia was then part of the Viking-ruled Danelaw. Æthelred's ancestry is unknown. He was probably the leader of an unsuccessful Mercian invasion of Wales in 881, and soon afterwards he acknowledged the lordship of King Alfred the Great of Wessex. The alliance was cemented by the marriage of Æthelred to Alfred's daughter Æthelflæd.

Æthelflæd 9th and 10th-century ruler of Mercia in England

Æthelflæd, Lady of the Mercians ruled Mercia in the English Midlands from 911 until her death. She was the eldest daughter of Alfred the Great, king of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex, and his wife Ealhswith. Æthelflæd was born around 870 at the height of the Viking invasions of England. By 878, most of England was under Danish Viking rule – East Anglia and Northumbria having been conquered, and Mercia partitioned between the English and the Vikings – but in that year Alfred won a crucial victory at the Battle of Edington. Soon afterwards the English-controlled western half of Mercia came under the rule of Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians, who accepted Alfred's overlordship. Alfred adopted the title King of the English, claiming to rule all English people not living in areas under Viking control. In the mid-880s, Alfred sealed the strategic alliance between the surviving English kingdoms by marrying Æthelflæd to Æthelred.

Alfred the Great 9th-century King of Wessex

Alfred the Great was King of Wessex from 871 to c. 886 and King of the Anglo-Saxons from c. 886 to 899. He was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf of Wessex. His father died when he was young and three of Alfred's brothers reigned in turn. Alfred took the throne after the death of his brother Æthelred and spent several years dealing with Viking invasions. He won a decisive victory in the Battle of Edington in 878 and made an agreement with the Vikings, creating what was known as Danelaw in the North of England. Alfred also oversaw the conversion of Viking leader Guthrum to Christianity. He successfully defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest, and he became the dominant ruler in England. He was also the first King of the West Saxons to style himself King of the Anglo-Saxons. Details of his life are described in a work by 9th-century Welsh scholar and bishop Asser.

Arabian Empire

January 6 is the sixth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 359 days remaining until the end of the year.

Hasan ibn Zayd

Al-Ḥasan ibn Zayd ibn Muḥammad ibn Ismā‘il ibn al-Ḥasan ibn Zayd, also known as al-Da‘ī al-kabīr, was an Alid who became the founder of the Zaydid dynasty of Tabaristan.

Alid dynasties of northern Iran

Alid dynasties of northern Iran or Alâvids. In the 9th–14th centuries, the northern Iranian regions of Tabaristan, Daylam and Gilan, sandwiched between the Caspian Sea and the Alborz range, came under the rule of a number of Alid dynasties, espousing the Zaydi branch of Shia Islam.

Asia

March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 302 days remaining until the end of the year.

Emperor Yōzei Emperor of Japan

Emperor Yōzei was the 57th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Throne seat of state of a potentate or dignitary

A throne is the seat of state of a potentate or dignitary, especially the seat occupied by a sovereign on state occasions; or the seat occupied by a pope or bishop on ceremonial occasions. "Throne" in an abstract sense can also refer to the monarchy or the Crown itself, an instance of metonymy, and is also used in many expressions such as "the power behind the throne". The expression "ascend (mount) the throne" takes its meaning from the steps leading up to the dais or platform, on which the throne is placed, being formerly comprised in the word's significance.

By topic

Religion

May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 230 days remaining until the end of the year.

Pope Marinus I pope

Pope Marinus I was Pope from 16 December 882 until his death in 884. He succeeded John VIII from around the end of December 882.

Rome Capital city and comune in Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 860s decade ran from January 1, 860, to December 31, 869.

The 880s decade ran from January 1, 880, to December 31, 889.

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

847 Year

Year 847 (DCCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

862 Year

Year 862 (DCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 864 (DCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

891 Year

Year 891 (DCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

835 Year

Year 835 (DCCCXXXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

850 Year

For codepage, see CP850. Year 850 (DCCCL) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

852 Year

Year 852 (DCCCLII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

887 Year

Year 887 (DCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

873 Year

Year 873 (DCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

879 Year

Year 879 (DCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

900 Year

Year 900 (CM) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

896 Year

Year 896 (DCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

904 Year

Year 904 (CMIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

906 Year

Year 906 (CMVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

907 Year

Year 907 (CMVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

882 Year

Year 882 (DCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

888 Year

Year 888 (DCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Martínez Diez 2005, pp. 163 and 178.