Pope Adrian III

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Pope Saint

Adrian III
Pope Adrian III.jpg
Papacy began17 May 884
Papacy ended8 July 885
Predecessor Marinus I
Successor Stephen V
Personal details
Birth nameAdrian or Agapitus
Born Rome, Papal States
Died8 July 885
Modena, Carolingian Empire
Sainthood
Feast day8 July
Venerated in Catholic Church
Canonized2 June 1891
Rome, Kingdom of Italy
by  Pope Leo XIII
Other popes named Adrian

Pope Adrian III or Hadrian III (Latin : Adrianus or Hadrianus; died July 885) was Pope from 17 May 884 to his death. [1] According to Jean Mabillon, his birth name was Agapitus. [2] He served for little more than a year, during which he worked to help the people of Italy in a very troubled time of famine and war.

Pope leader of the Catholic Church

The pope, also known as the supreme pontiff, is the Bishop of Rome and ex officio leader of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church. Since 1929, the pope has also been head of state of Vatican City, a city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.

Jean Mabillon French Benedictine monk, medievist, paleographer, diplomatics and theologian

Dom Jean Mabillon, O.S.B., was a French Benedictine monk and scholar of the Congregation of Saint Maur. He is considered the founder of the disciplines of palaeography and diplomatics.

Contents

Biography

He was born at Rome. He laboured hard to alleviate the misery of the people of Italy, prey to famine and to continuous war. [3] He is also known to have written a letter condemning the Christians of both Muslim-ruled and Christian-ruled parts of Spain for being too friendly with the Jews in these lands. [4]

Rome Capital city and comune in Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

Al-Andalus in historiography, the territories of the Iberian Peninsula under moorish rule between 711 and 1492

Al-Andalus, also known as Muslim Spain, Muslim Iberia, or Islamic Iberia, was a medieval Muslim territory and cultural domain that in its early period occupied most of Iberia, today's Portugal and Spain. At its greatest geographical extent, it occupied the northwest of the Iberian peninsula and a part of present day southern France Septimania and for nearly a century extended its control from Fraxinet over the Alpine passes which connect Italy with the remainder of Western Europe. The name more generally describes the parts of the peninsula governed by Muslims at various times between 711 and 1492, though the boundaries changed constantly as the Christian Reconquista progressed, eventually shrinking to the south around modern-day Andalusia and then to the Emirate of Granada.

He died in July 885 at San Cesario sul Panaro (Modena) not long after embarking on a trip to Worms, in modern Germany. The purpose the journey was to attend an Imperial Diet after being summoned by the Frankish King Charles III, the Fat, to settle the succession to the Holy Roman Empire [5] and discuss the rising power of the Saracens.

San Cesario sul Panaro Comune in Emilia-Romagna, Italy

San Cesario sul Panaro is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Modena in the Italian region Emilia-Romagna, located about 25 kilometres (16 mi) northwest of Bologna and about 12 kilometres (7 mi) southeast of Modena. Sports car manufacturer Pagani is located here.

Modena Comune in Emilia-Romagna, Italy

Modena is a city and comune (municipality) on the south side of the Po Valley, in the Province of Modena in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy.

Worms, Germany Place in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Worms is a city in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, situated on the Upper Rhine about 60 kilometres south-southwest of Frankfurt-am-Main. It had approximately 82,000 inhabitants as of 2015.

His death and subsequent burial in the church of San Silvestro Nonantola Abbey near Modena [6] is commemorated in the sculpted reliefs (c.1122) that frame the doorway of this church. His relics are found near the high altar, and his tomb at once became a popular place of pilgrimage. His cult was confirmed in 1891, and his feast day is 8 July. [6]

See also

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References

  1. Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope St. Adrian III"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. According to Reginald L. Poole (1917), "The Names and Numbers of Medieval Popes", The English Historical Review , 32 (128), 465–78, at 467, Mabillon has probably confused Adrian III, who succeeded Marinus I, with Agapetus II, who succeeded Marinus II a century later.
  3. Monks of Ramsgate. “Hadrian III”. Book of Saints, 1921. CatholicSaints.Info. 1 September 2013
  4. Bernard S. Bachrach (1977). Early Medieval Jewish Policy in Western Europe (reprint ed.). University of Minnesota Press. p. 190. ISBN   9780816608140.
  5. Richard P. McBrien, Lives of the Popes: The Pontiffs from St. Peter to John Paul II, (HarperCollins, 2000), 143.
  6. 1 2 François Bougard (2002), "Hadrian III", in Philippe Levillain, ed., The Papacy: An Encyclopedia, vol. 2 (New York and London: Routledge), 682.

Further reading

Francis Dvornik, in Czech František Dvorník, was a priest and academic, and one of the leading twentieth-century experts on Slavic and Byzantine history, and on relations between the churches of Rome and Constantinople.

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Marinus I
Pope
884–885
Succeeded by
Stephen V