Pope Eusebius

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Pope Saint

Eusebius
PopeEusebius.jpg
Papacy began18 April 310
Papacy ended17 August 310
Predecessor Marcellus I
Successor Miltiades
Personal details
Birth nameEusebius
Born?
Died17 August 310
Sicily, Western Roman Empire
Sainthood
Feast day26 September

Pope Eusebius (from Greek Εὐσέβιος "pious"; died 17 August 310) was the Bishop of Rome from 18 April 310 until his death four months later.

Contents

History

His pontificate lasted four months, after which, in consequence of disturbances within the Roman Church which led to acts of violence, he was banished by the emperor Maxentius, who had been the ruler of Rome since 306, and had at first shown himself friendly to the Christians. The difficulty arose, as in the case of his predecessor Pope Marcellus I, out of his attitude toward the lapsi. [1] [2]

Eusebius maintained the attitude of the Roman Church, adopted after the Decian persecutions (250-51), that the apostates should not be forever debarred from ecclesiastical communion, but on the other hand, should be readmitted only after doing proper penance. This view was opposed by a faction of Christians in Rome under the leadership of Heraclius. Johann Peter Kirsch believes it likely that Heraclius was the chief of a party made up of apostates and their followers, who demanded immediate restoration to the Roman Church. Maxentius exiled them both. [3]

Eusebius died in exile in Sicily and was buried in the catacomb of Callixtus. Pope Damasus I placed an epitaph of eight hexameters over his tomb because of his firm defense of ecclesiastical discipline and the banishment which he suffered thereby. [3] [2]

His feast is celebrated on 26 September.

See also

Notes

  1. Butler, Alban. "St. Eusebius, Pope and Confessor", Lives of the Saints, 1866
  2. 1 2 PD-icon.svg  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Jackson, Samuel Macauley, ed. (1914). "Eusebius". New Schaff–Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (third ed.). London and New York: Funk and Wagnalls.
  3. 1 2 Kirsch, Johann Peter. "Pope St. Eusebius." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 5. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1909. 16 Mar. 2015
Titles of the Great Christian Church
Preceded by
Marcellus I
Bishop of Rome
Pope

309–310
Succeeded by
Miltiades

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