Pope Sisinnius

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Pope

Sisinnius
Sisinnius.jpg
19th century depiction Pope Sisinnius
Papacy began15 January 708
Papacy ended4 February 708
Predecessor John VII
Successor Constantine
Personal details
Born650
Syria, Rashidun Caliphate
Died(708-02-04)4 February 708
Rome, Byzantine Empire

Pope Sisinnius (c. 650 4 February 708) was Bishop of Rome from 15 January 708 to his death in February of that year. [1]

A Syrian by birth, [2] Sisinnius' father's name was John. [1] The paucity of donations to the papacy during his reign (42 pounds of gold and 310 pounds of silver, a fraction of the personal donations of other contemporary pontiffs) indicate that he was probably not from the aristocracy. [3]

Syria Country in Western Asia

Syria, officially the Syrian Arab Republic, is a country in Western Asia, bordering Lebanon to the southwest, the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest. A country of fertile plains, high mountains, and deserts, Syria is home to diverse ethnic and religious groups, including Syrian Arabs, Greeks, Armenians, Assyrians, Kurds, Circassians, Mandeans and Turkemens. Religious groups include Sunnis, Christians, Alawites, Druze, Isma'ilis, Mandeans, Shiites, Salafis, Yazidis, and Jews. Sunnis make up the largest religious group in Syria.

Sisinnius was selected as pope during the Byzantine Papacy. He succeeded Pope John VII after a vacancy of three months. [4] He was consecrated around 15 January 708. [1]

Byzantine Papacy Byzantine domination of the Roman papacy, 537 to 752

The Byzantine Papacy was a period of Byzantine domination of the Roman papacy from 537 to 752, when popes required the approval of the Byzantine Emperor for episcopal consecration, and many popes were chosen from the apocrisiarii or the inhabitants of Byzantine-ruled Greece, Syria, or Sicily. Justinian I conquered the Italian peninsula in the Gothic War (535–554) and appointed the next three popes, a practice that would be continued by his successors and later be delegated to the Exarchate of Ravenna.

Pope John VII pope

Pope John VII was Bishop of Rome from 1 March 705 to his death in 707. Like his predecessor, John VI, John VII was an ethnic Greek. He is one of the popes of the Byzantine Papacy.

Sede vacante is a term for the state of an episcopal see while without a bishop. In the canon law of the Catholic Church, the term is used to refer to the vacancy of any see of a particular church, but it comes into especially wide journalistic use when the see is that of the papacy.

Sisinnius remained pope for just twenty days. [4] According to the Catholic Encyclopedia , "although he was so afflicted with gout that he was unable even to feed himself, he is nevertheless said to have been a man of strong character, and to have been able to take thought for the good of the city". [1] Among his few acts as pope was the consecration of a bishop for Corsica. [1] He also ordered "that lime be burned in order to restore portions" of the walls of Rome. [5] The restoration of the walls planned by Sisinnius was carried out by Pope Gregory II. [6]

<i>Catholic Encyclopedia</i> English-language encyclopedia

The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".

Gout Medical condition that results in recurrent pain and swelling of joints

Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis characterized by recurrent attacks of a red, tender, hot, and swollen joint. Pain typically comes on rapidly, reaching maximal intensity in less than 12 hours. The joint at the base of the big toe is affected in about half of cases. It may also result in tophi, kidney stones, or urate nephropathy.

Corsica Island in the Mediterranean, also a region and a department of France

Corsica is an island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of the 18 regions of France. It is located southeast of the French mainland and west of the Italian Peninsula, with the nearest land mass being the Italian island of Sardinia to the immediate south. A single chain of mountains makes up two-thirds of the island.

Sisinnius was buried in Old St. Peter's Basilica. [1] He was succeeded less than two months later by another Syrian, Constantine, [4] who was probably his brother. [7]

Old St. Peters Basilica religious building

Old St. Peter's Basilica was the building that stood, from the 4th to 16th centuries, where the new St. Peter's Basilica stands today in Vatican City. Construction of the basilica, built over the historical site of the Circus of Nero, began during the reign of Emperor Constantine I. The name "old St. Peter's Basilica" has been used since the construction of the current basilica to distinguish the two buildings.

Pope Constantine pope

Pope Constantine was Bishop of Rome from 25 March 708 to his death in 715. With the exception of Antipope Constantine, he was the only pope to bear such a "quintessentially" Eastern name of an emperor. During this period, the regnal name was also used by emperors and patriarchs.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope Sisinnius"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. Joseph S. Brusher, Popes through the Ages, (Neff-Kane, 1980), 174.
  3. Jeffrey Richards. 1979. The popes and the papacy in the early Middle Ages, 476–752. p. 245.
  4. 1 2 3 Ekonomou, 2007, p. 246.
  5. Ekonomou, 2007, p. 248.
  6. Charles Isidore Hemans. 1874. Historic and monumental Rome. p. 100.
    • Williams, George L. 2004. Papal Genealogy: The Families and Descendants of the Popes. McFarland. ISBN   0-7864-2071-5. p. 10.
    International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

    The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

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References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
John VII
Pope
708
Succeeded by
Constantine