Pope Anastasius I

Last updated
Pope Saint

Anastasius I
Anastasius I.jpg
Papacy began27 November 399
Papacy ended19 December 401
Predecessor Siricius
Successor Innocent I
Personal details
Birth nameAnastasius
Died19 December 401
Rome
Sainthood
Feast day19 December
Other popes named Anastasius
Papal styles of
Pope Anastasius I
Emblem of the Papacy SE.svg
Reference style His Holiness
Spoken styleYour Holiness
Religious styleHoly Father
Posthumous style Saint
Pope Saint Anastasius I
39-St.Anastasius I.jpg
Mosaic of St. Anastasius I at Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls
Pope
BornAnastasius
Died19 December 401
Rome
Venerated inCatholic Church
Feast 19 December
Attributes Papal Tiara

Pope Anastasius I (died 19 December 401) served as Pope from 27 November 399 to his death in 401. [1] He was successor to Pope Siricius and was succeeded by his son Pope Innocent I.

Pope Leader of the Catholic Church

The pope, also known as the supreme pontiff, is the bishop of Rome and leader of the worldwide Catholic Church. Since 1929, the pope has also been head of state of Vatican City, a city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.

Pope Siricius pope

Pope Siricius was Pope from December 384 to his death in 399. He was successor to Pope Damasus I and was himself succeeded by Pope Anastasius I.

Pope Innocent I pope

Pope Innocent I served as the Pope of the Catholic Church from 401 to his death in 417. From the beginning of his papacy, he was seen as the general arbitrator of ecclesiastical disputes in both the East and the West. He confirmed the prerogatives of the Archbishop of Thessalonica, and issued a decretal on disciplinary matters referred to him by the Bishop of Rouen. He defended the exiled John Chrysostom and consulted with the bishops of Africa concerning the Pelagian controversy, confirming the decisions of the African synods. The Catholic priest-scholar Johann Peter Kirsch, 1500 years later, described Innocent as a very energetic and highly gifted individual "...who fulfilled admirably the duties of his office".

Contents

Biography

He was born in Rome, the son of Maximus. He condemned the writings of the Alexandrian theologian Origen shortly after their translation into Latin. He fought against these writings throughout his papacy, and in 400 he called a council to discuss them. The council agreed that Origen was not faithful to the Catholic Church. [2]

Alexandria Metropolis in Egypt

Alexandria is the second-largest city in Egypt and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria is also a popular tourist destination.

Origen 3rd-century Christian scholar from Alexandria

Origen of Alexandria, also known as Origen Adamantius, was an early Christian scholar, ascetic, and theologian who was born and spent the first half of his career in Alexandria. He was a prolific writer who wrote roughly 2,000 treatises in multiple branches of theology, including textual criticism, biblical exegesis and biblical hermeneutics, homiletics, and spirituality. He was one of the most influential figures in early Christian theology, apologetics, and asceticism. He has been described as "the greatest genius the early church ever produced".

Latin Indo-European language of the Italic family

Latin is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet.

If Origen has put forth any other writings, you are to know that they and their author are alike condemned by me. The Lord have you in safe keeping, my lord and brother deservedly held in honour.

letter to Simplicianus, [3]

During his reign he also encouraged Catholics in North Africa to fight Donatism. [2] He instructed priests to stand and bow their head as they read from the gospels. [1] Among his friends were Augustine, Jerome, and Paulinus. Jerome speaks of him as a man of great holiness who was rich in his poverty. [4] He died in Rome [5] and was eventually buried in the Catacomb of Pontian together with his son and immediate successor, Pope Innocent I, which is probably a unique case of a Pope being succeeded by his son. [6]

Donatism was a heresy leading to schism in the Church of Carthage from the fourth to the sixth centuries AD. Donatists argued that Christian clergy must be faultless for their ministry to be effective and their prayers and sacraments to be valid. Donatism had its roots in the long-established Christian community of the Roman Africa province in the persecutions of Christians under Diocletian. Named after the Berber Christian bishop Donatus Magnus, Donatism flourished during the fourth and fifth centuries.

Augustine of Hippo Early Christian theologian, philosopher and Church Father

Augustine of Hippo was a Roman African, early Christian theologian and Neoplatonic philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of the Western Church and Western philosophy, and indirectly all of Western Christianity. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius in North Africa and is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers of the Latin Church for his writings in the Patristic Period. Among his most important works are The City of God, De doctrina Christiana, and Confessions.

Jerome 4th and 5th-century Catholic priest, theologian, and saint

Jerome was a Latin Catholic priest, confessor, theologian, and historian, commonly known as Saint Jerome. He was born at Stridon, a village near Emona on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia. He is best known for his translation of most of the Bible into Latin, and his commentaries on the Gospels. His list of writings is extensive.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Saint of the Day, December 19". SaintPatrickDC.org. Retrieved 2012-03-04.
  2. 1 2 "Pope Anastasius I". The Ecole Glossary. Archived from the original on 2010-06-16.
  3. "Letter XCV. From Pope Anastasius to Simplicianus". The Principal Works of St. Jerome.
  4. Wikisource-logo.svg Campbell, Thomas (1907). "Pope St. Anastasius I"  . In Herbermann, Charles (ed.). Catholic Encyclopedia . 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company.|access-date= requires |url= (help)
  5. The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. "Saint Anastasius I". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 8 August 2016.
  6. "Sant' Innocenzo I su santiebeati.it".

The Ökumenische Heiligenlexikon (ÖHL) or Ecumenical Lexicon of Saints is an independent, ecumenical, private internet project by Protestant priest Joachim Schäfer, from Stuttgart, which aims to publish information on the lives of saints and other "holy people".


Titles of the Great Christian Church
Preceded by
Siricius
Pope
399401
Succeeded by
Innocent I