Pope Benedict VII

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Pope

Benedict VII
Papacy beganOctober 974
Papacy endedOctober 983 [1]
Predecessor Benedict VI
Successor John XIV
Personal details
Born Rome, Papal States
Died(983-07-10)10 July 983
Rome, Papal States
Previous post Cardinal-Priest of San Teodoro (972–974)
Other popes named Benedict

Pope Benedict VII (Latin : Benedictus VII; died October 983) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from October 974 to his death.

Contents

Family and early career

Benedict was born in Rome, the son of David or Deodatus and nephew of Alberic II of Spoleto. He was also connected to the Conti family. [2] Before his accession to the papacy, he served as bishop of Sutri. [1]

Pontificate

Benedict VII was elected pope by the Roman clergy and people in October 974 under the influence of Sicco, envoy of Emperor Otto II. He ascended as a compromise candidate to replace Boniface VII, who had caused the death of Pope Benedict VI, usurped the pontificate, and in a month plundered the Vatican of its most valuable contents. He then escaped to Constantinople. [2] The new pope's authority was opposed by Boniface VII and his supporters, and although the antipope himself was forced to flee, his party followed fiercely in his footsteps and compelled Benedict to call upon Otho II for help. Once he was firmly established on his throne by the emperor, he showed himself both desirous of checking the tide of simony which was rising high in the Church, and of advancing the cause of monasticism. [1]

Benedict VII consecrated the priest James, who had been sent to him by the people of Carthage "to help the wretched province of Africa," which since the Muslim conquest of the Maghreb, had seen a steep decline in the number of bishops. [3] Benedict VII visited the city of Orvieto with his nephew Filippo Alberici, who later settled there and became consul of the city in 1016. In 978 Benedict issued a bull defining the boundaries of the Diocese of Vic for Bishop Froia, thereby rescinding the bulls issued by Pope John XIII that had made Vic an archdiocese. In March 981, Benedict presided over a synod in St Peter's that prohibited simony. In September 981, he convened a Lateran synod.

Benedict VII died in 984, and was interred at Santa Croce in Gerusalemme. [2]

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Ostrogothic Papacy

The Ostrogothic Papacy was a period from 493 to 537 where the papacy was strongly influenced by the Ostrogothic Kingdom, if the pope was not outright appointed by the Ostrogothic King. The selection and administration of popes during this period was strongly influenced by Theodoric the Great and his successors Athalaric and Theodahad. This period terminated with Justinian I's (re)conquest of Rome during the Gothic War (535–554), inaugurating the Byzantine Papacy (537-752).

References

  1. 1 2 3 Mann, Horace. "Pope Benedict VII." The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 2. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. 7 November 2017
  2. 1 2 3 De Montor, Artaud. The Lives and Times of the Popes, The Catholic Publication Society of New York, 1911
  3. Philip Zaleski (30 Nov 2010). The Best Spiritual Writing 2011. Penguin. ISBN   9781101478127. At the time of the Arab conquest there were more than three hundred bishops in the area, but by the tenth century Pope Benedict VII could not find three bishops to consecrate a new bishop.

PD-icon.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope Benedict VII". Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Benedict VI
Pope
974–983
Succeeded by
John XIV