Pope Boniface VI

Last updated
Pope

Boniface VI
Boniface VI.jpg
Papacy beganApril 896
Papacy endedApril 896
Predecessor Formosus
Successor Stephen VI
Personal details
Birth nameBonifacio
Born Rome, Papal States
DiedApril 896
Rome, Papal States [1]
Other popes named Boniface

Pope Boniface VI (Latin : Bonifatius VI; 806 – April 896) was Pope in April 896. He was a native of Rome. [2] His election came about as a result of riots soon after the death of Pope Formosus. Prior to his reign, he had twice incurred a sentence of deprivation of orders as a subdeacon and as a priest. [3] After a pontificate of fifteen days, he is said by some to have died of the gout, [4] by others to have been forcibly ejected to make way for Stephen VI, the candidate of the Spoletan party. [5]

Pope Leader of the Catholic Church

The pope, also known as the supreme pontiff, is the bishop of Rome and leader of the worldwide Catholic Church. Since 1929, the pope has also been head of state of Vatican City, a city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.

Rome Capital of Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

Pope Formosus pope

Pope Formosus was Cardinal-bishop and Pope, his papacy lasting from 6 October 891 to his death in 896. His brief reign as Pope was troubled, marked by interventions in power struggles over the Patriarchate of Constantinople, the kingdom of West Francia, and the Holy Roman Empire. Formosus's remains were exhumed and put on trial in the Cadaver Synod.

At a synod in Rome held by John IX in 898, his election was pronounced null and void. [4]

Synod council of a church

A synod is a council of a church, usually convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. The word synod comes from the Greek σύνοδος (sýnodos) meaning "assembly" or "meeting", and it is synonymous with the Latin word concilium meaning "council". Originally, synods were meetings of bishops, and the word is still used in that sense in Catholicism, Oriental Orthodoxy and Eastern Orthodoxy. In modern usage, the word often refers to the governing body of a particular church, whether its members are meeting or not. It is also sometimes used to refer to a church that is governed by a synod.

Pope John IX pope

Pope John IX was Pope from January 898 to his death in 900.

See also

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References

  1. The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. "Boniface VI". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 9 August 2016.
  2. Platina, Bartolomeo (1479), The Lives of the Popes From The Time Of Our Saviour Jesus Christ to the Accession of Gregory VII, I, London: Griffith Farran & Co., p. 237, retrieved 2013-04-25
  3. Richard P. McBrien, Lives of the Popes: The Pontiffs from St. Peter to Benedict XVI, (HarperCollins, 2000), 146.
  4. 1 2 Richard P. McBrien, 146.
  5. Wikisource-logo.svg  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope Boniface VI"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton.
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Formosus
Pope
896
Succeeded by
Stephen VI