Pope Boniface VI

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Pope

Boniface VI
Papacy beganApril 896
Papacy endedApril 896
Predecessor Formosus
Successor Stephen VI
Personal details
Birth nameBonifacio
Born Rome, Papal States
DiedApril 896
Rome, Papal States [1]
Other popes named Boniface

Pope Boniface VI (Latin : Bonifatius VI; 806 – April 896) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States in April 896. He was a native of Rome. [2] His election came about as a result of riots soon after the death of Pope Formosus. Prior to his reign, he had twice incurred a sentence of deprivation of orders as a subdeacon and as a priest. [3] After a pontificate of fifteen days, he is said by some to have died of the gout, [3] by others to have been forcibly ejected to make way for Stephen VI, the candidate of the Spoletan party. [4]

At a synod in Rome held by John IX in 898, his election was pronounced null and void. [3]

See also

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References

  1. The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. "Boniface VI". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 9 August 2016.
  2. Platina, Bartolomeo (1479), The Lives of the Popes From The Time Of Our Saviour Jesus Christ to the Accession of Gregory VII, I, London: Griffith Farran & Co., p. 237, retrieved 2013-04-25
  3. 1 2 3 McBrien, Richard P. (2000). Lives of the Popes: The Pontiffs from St. Peter to Benedict XVI. HarperCollins. p. 146. ISBN   0-06-087807-X.
  4. Wikisource-logo.svg  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope Boniface VI". Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Formosus
Pope
896
Succeeded by
Stephen VI