Pope Leo VII

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Pope

Leo VII
Leone-VII.jpg
Papacy began3 January 936
Papacy ended13 July 939
Predecessor John XI
Successor Stephen VIII
Personal details
Died(939-07-13)13 July 939
Previous post Cardinal-Priest of San Sisto (8 April 933-3 January 936)
Other popes named Leo

Pope Leo VII (Latin : Leo VII; died 13 July 939) was Pope from 3 January 936 to his death in 939. He was preceded by Pope John XI and followed by Pope Stephen VIII. [1] [2] Leo VII's election to the papacy was secured by Alberic II of Spoleto, the ruler of Rome at the time. Alberic wanted to choose the pope so that the papacy would continue to yield to his authority. Leo was the priest of the church of St. Sixtus in Rome, thought to be a Benedictine monk. He had little ambition towards the papacy, but consented under pressure.

Pope leader of the Catholic Church

The pope, also known as the supreme pontiff, is the Bishop of Rome and ex officio leader of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church. Since 1929, the pope has also been head of state of Vatican City, a city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.

Pope John XI pope

Pope John XI was Pope from March 931 to his death in December 935.

Pope Stephen VIII pope

Pope Stephen VIII was Pope from 14 July 939 to his death in 942.

As pope, Leo VII reigned for only three years. Most of his bulls were grants of privilege to monasteries, especially including the Abbey of Cluny. [3] "Pope Leo VII"] Leo called for Odo of Cluny to mediate between Alberic and Hugh of Italy, Alberic's stepfather, the King of Italy. Odo was successful in negotiating a truce after arranging a marriage between Hugh's daughter Alda and Alberic. Leo VII also appointed Frederick, Archbishop of Mainz, as a reformer in Germany. Leo allowed Frederick to drive out Jews that refused to be baptized, but he did not endorse the forced baptism of Jews. [4]

Papal bull type of letters patent or charter issued by a Pope of the Catholic Church

A papal bull is a type of public decree, letters patent, or charter issued by a pope of the Roman Catholic Church. It is named after the leaden seal (bulla) that was traditionally appended to the end in order to authenticate it.

Odo of Cluny benedictine monk, second abbott of Cluny

Odo of Cluny was the second abbot of Cluny. He enacted various reforms in the Cluniac system of France and Italy. He is venerated as a saint by the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches. His feast day is 18 November.

Hugh of Arles was King of Italy from 924 until his death in 947. He was a Bosonid. During his reign, he empowered his relatives at the expense of the aristocracy and tried to establish a relationship with the Byzantine-Roman Empire. He had success in defending the realm from external enemies, but his domestic habits and policies created many internal foes and he was removed from power before his death.

After his death in July 939, Leo VII was interred at St. Peter's Basilica.

St. Peters Basilica Italian Renaissance church in Vatican City

The Papal Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican, or simply St. Peter's Basilica, is an Italian Renaissance church in Vatican City, the papal enclave within the city of Rome.

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References

  1. 9th edition (1880s) of the Encyclopædia Britannica
  2. Platina, Bartolomeo (1479), The Lives of the Popes From The Time Of Our Saviour Jesus Christ to the Accession of Gregory VII, I, London: Griffith Farran & Co., p. 239, retrieved 2013-04-25
  3. Mann, Horace. "Pope Leo VII." The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 9. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910. 4 November 2017
  4. Popes Through The Ages by Joseph Brusher S. J.
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
John XI
Pope
936–939
Succeeded by
Stephen VIII