Pope Marcellinus

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Pope Saint

Marcellinus
Bishop of Rome
Papacy began30 June 296
Papacy ended304
Predecessor Caius
Successor Marcellus I
Personal details
Bornunknown date
Rome, Western Roman Empire [1]
Died304
Rome, Western Roman Empire
Sainthood
Feast day26 April (Catholic)
7 June (Serbian Orthodox)

Pope Marcellinus was the bishop of Rome from 30 June 296 to his death in 304. He may have renounced Christianity during Emperor Diocletian's persecution of Christians before repenting afterwards, which would explain why he is omitted from lists of martyrs. He is today venerated as a saint in Catholic and Serbian Orthodox Church.

Contents

Pontificate

According to the Liberian Catalogue , Marcellinus was a Roman, the son of Projectus. He succeeded Caius as [[bishop of Rome on 30 June 296. [1] Marcellinus' pontificate began at a time when Diocletian was Roman emperor, but had not yet started to persecute the Christians. He left Christianity rather free and so the church's membership grew. Caesar Galerius led the pagan movement against Christianity and aroused Diocletian against Christianity in the year 302: first Christian soldiers had to leave the army, later the Church's property was confiscated and Christian books were destroyed. After two fires in Diocletian's palace he took harder measures against Christians: they had either to apostatize or they were sentenced to death.

Marcellinus is not mentioned in the Martyrologium hieronymianum , or in the Depositio episcoporum, or in the Depositio martyrum. The Liber Pontificalis , based on the lost Acts of St Marcellinus, relates that during Diocletian’s persecution Marcellinus was called upon to sacrifice, and offered incense to idols, but that, repenting shortly afterwards, he confessed the faith of Christ and suffered martyrdom with several companions. Other documents speak of his defection, and it is probably this lapse that explains the silence of the ancient liturgical calendars. In the beginning of the 5th century, Petilianus, the Donatist bishop of Cirta, says that Marcellinus and his priests had given up the holy books to the pagans during the persecution and offered incense to false gods. St Augustine denied the affair. [1] [2] The records of the pseudo-Council of Sinuessa, which were fabricated at the beginning of the 6th century, state that Marcellinus after his fall presented himself before a council, which refused to try him on the ground that prima sedes a nemine iudicatur ("The first See is judged by none"). [2]

According to the Liber Pontificalis, Marcellinus was buried on 26 April 304 in the cemetery of Priscilla, on the Via Salaria, 25 days after his martyrdom; the Liberian Catalogue gives as the date 25 October. The fact of the martyrdom, too, is not established with certainty. After a considerable interregnum, he was succeeded by Marcellus, with whom he has sometimes been confused. [2]

Veneration

Marcellinus was mentioned in the General Roman Calendar, into which a feast day in his honour jointly with that of Saint Cletus on 26 April was inserted in the thirteenth century. [3] Because of the uncertainties regarding both, this joint feast was removed from that calendar in 1969. [3] Saint Cletus is still listed in the Roman Martyrology under 26 April date; but Saint Marcellinus is no longer mentioned in that professedly incomplete list of recognized saints. [4] Pope Marcellinus, along with Pope Marcellus, is commemorated in the Serbian Prologue of Ohrid on 7 June according to the Julian Calendar. [5]

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Kirsch, Johann Peter. "Pope Saint Marcellinus." The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 9. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1910. 28 September 2017
  2. 1 2 3 Wikisource-logo.svg One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Marcellinus, St". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  3. 1 2 Calendarium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana 1969), p.121
  4. Martyrologium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana 2001 ISBN   88-209-7210-7)
  5. http://www.stnicholasredbank.com/june1-8.htm
Titles of the Great Christian Church
Preceded by
Caius
Bishop of Rome
Pope

296–304
Succeeded by
Marcellus I

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