Athleta Christi

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Athleta Christi (Latin : "Champion of Christ") was a class of Early Christian soldier martyrs, of whom the most familiar example is one such "military saint," Saint Sebastian.

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Usage

Since the 15th century, the title has been a political one, granted by Popes to men who have led military campaigns defending Christianity. The militant Catholic hymn Athleta Christi nobilis ("Noble Champion of the Lord"), a hymn for Matins on May 18, the feast of Saint Venantius, was written in the 17th century by an unknown author. The medieval precursors of the hymn are numerous and include hymns, responsories and antiphons dedicated to many saints and martyrs, even non-militant ones such as Cosmas and Damian. [1]

Those who have held the title include:

See also

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References

  1. Latrobe article Archived January 9, 2005, at the Wayback Machine
  2. The Fulfilled Promise: A Documentary Account of Religious Persecution in Albania; By Gjon Sinishta; page 6.