Zechariah (Hebrew prophet)

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Zechariah as depicted on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel Zacharias (Michelangelo).jpg
Zechariah as depicted on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel

Zechariah [lower-alpha 1] was a person in the Hebrew Bible and traditionally considered the author of the Book of Zechariah, the eleventh of the Twelve Minor Prophets. He was a prophet of the Kingdom of Judah, and, like the prophet Ezekiel, was of priestly extraction.

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Prophet

Zechariah as depicted by James Tissot Tissot Zechariah.jpg
Zechariah as depicted by James Tissot

The book of Zechariah introduces the prophet as the son of Berechiah, the son of Iddo (Zechariah 1:1). The book of Ezra names Zechariah as the son of Iddo (Ezra 5:1 and Ezra 6:14), but it is likely that Berechiah was Zechariah's father, and Iddo was his grandfather. [1]

His prophetical career probably began in the second year of Darius, king of Persia (520 BC). His greatest concern appears to have been with the building of the Second Temple. [1]

He was probably not the "Zechariah" mentioned by Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew (23:35) and the Gospel of Luke (11:51); Zechariah ben Jehoiada was more likely intended. [2]

Bahá'í Faith

Bahá'í teachers have made comparisons between the prophecies of Zechariah and the Súriy-i-Haykal in the Summons of the Lord of Hosts, a collection of the Tablets of Bahá’u’lláh. [3] [ importance? ]

Liturgical commemoration

On the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar, his feast day is February 8. He is commemorated with the other Minor Prophets in the calendar of saints of the Armenian Apostolic Church on July 31. The Roman Catholic Church honors him with a feast day assigned to September 6.

See also

Notes

  1. ( /zɛkəˈr.ə/ ; Hebrew: זְכַרְיָה, Modern: Zekharya, Tiberian: Zəḵaryāh, "YHWH has remembered"; Arabic: زكريّاZakariya' or Zakkariya; Greek: ΖαχαρίαςZakharias; Latin: Zacharias)

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Haggai 1

Haggai 1 is the first chapter of the Book of Haggai in the Hebrew Bible or the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. This book contains the prophecies spoken by the prophet Haggai, and is a part of the Book of the Twelve Minor Prophets.

Haggai 2

Haggai 2 is the second chapter of the Book of Haggai in the Hebrew Bible or the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. This book contains the prophecies attributes to the prophet Haggai, written c. 520-515 BCE, and is a part of the Book of the Twelve Minor Prophets.

Zechariah 1

Zechariah 1 is the first chapter of the Book of Zechariah in the Hebrew Bible or the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. This book contains the prophecies spoken by the prophet Zechariah, and is a part of the Book of the Twelve Minor Prophets.

Zechariah 8

Zechariah 8 is the eighth chapter of the Book of Zechariah in the Hebrew Bible or the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. This book contains the prophecies attributed to the prophet Zechariah, and is a part of the Book of the Twelve Minor Prophets. This chapter contains a continuation of the subject in the seventh chapter.

Ezra 5 A chapter in the Book of Ezra

Ezra 5 is the fifth chapter of the Book of Ezra in the Old Testament of the Christian Bible, or the book of Ezra-Nehemiah in the Hebrew Bible, which treats the book of Ezra and book of Nehemiah as one book. Jewish tradition states that Ezra is the author of Ezra-Nehemiah as well as the Book of Chronicles, but modern scholars generally accept that a compiler from 5th century BCE is the final author of these books. This chapter records the contribution of the prophets Haggai and Zechariah to the temple building project and the investigation by Persian officials. The section comprising chapter 1 to 6 describes the history before the arrival of Ezra to the land of Judah.

References

  1. 1 2 Hirsch, Emil G. (1906). "Zechariah". In Cyrus Adler; et al. (eds.). Jewish Encyclopedia. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Co.
  2. Pao & Schnabel on Luke 11:49–51 (2007). Beale & Carson (ed.). Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament . ISBN   978-0801026935. most identify this figure with the Zechariah of 2 Chron. 24:20–25, who was killed in the temple court
  3. Cynthia C. Shawamreh (December 1998). "Comparison of the Suriy-i-Haykal and the Prophecies of Zechariah". Wilmette Institute.

Sources

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain :  Easton, Matthew George (1897). "Zechariah"  . Easton's Bible Dictionary (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons.