Pope John XVII

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Pope

John XVII
Papa Joao XVII.jpg
Papacy began16 May 1003
Papacy ended6 November 1003
Predecessor Sylvester II
Successor John XVIII
Personal details
Birth nameGiovanni Sicco
Born Rome, Papal States
Died6 November 1003
Rome, Papal States, Holy Roman Empire
Other popes named John

Pope John XVII (Latin : Ioannes XVII; died 6 November 1003 [1] ) was Pope for about seven months from 16 May to 6 November 1003. [2] He was born John Sicco, the son of another John Sicco, [3] in the region of Rome then referred to as Biveretica. [2] He succeeded Pope Silvester II.

Contents

John XVII was nominated to the papacy by John Crescentius, a Roman noble who held power in the city in opposition to Emperor Otto III. [1] John XVII's successor, Pope John XVIII, was also selected by Crescentius.

John XVII approved of a mission led by Bruno of Querfurt to Eastern Europe. Bruno also requested John XVII to authorize his companion Benedict to evangelize among the Slavs. [4]

John died on 6 November 1003 and was buried in the Lateran Basilica between the two doors of the principal façade. According to John the Deacon, his epitaph began by stating that "here is the tomb of the supreme John, who is said to be Pope, for so he was called." [1]

Family

Before entering the priesthood, Sicco had been married and had three sons who also entered Holy Orders:

Confusion over ordinals

The previous legitimate Pope John is generally considered to be John XV (985–996). John XVI (997–998) was an antipope according to official reckoning, and thus his regnal number XVI should have been reused. But this did not occur, and the sequencing has never been corrected.

See also

Footnotes

  1. 1 2 3 Mann 1906, p. 124.
  2. 1 2 Mann 1906, p. 122.
  3. Mann 1906, p. 121.
  4. Matthews, Rupert (2013). The Popes: Every Question Answered. New York: Metro Books. p. 122. ISBN   978-1-4351-4571-9.

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References

Attribution:

Literature

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Silvester II
Pope
1003
Succeeded by
John XVIII