Properties of the Holy See

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The properties of the Holy See are regulated by the 1929 Lateran Treaty signed with the Kingdom of Italy. Although part of Italian territory, some of them enjoy immunities, similar to those of foreign embassies. [1] [2]

Contents

Outside Vatican City but inside Rome

World Heritage properties in Holy See (extraterritorial properties in Rome)
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Roma San Paolo fuori le mura BW 1.JPG
Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls (San Paolo Fuori le Mura)
Location Rome
Part ofHistoric Centre of Rome, the Properties of the Holy See in that City Enjoying Extraterritorial Rights and San Paolo Fuori le Mura
Includes
Criteria Cultural: (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(vi)
Reference 91ter
Inscription1980 (4th session)
Extensions1990, 2015
Area38.9 ha (0.150 sq mi)
Coordinates 41°53′24.8″N12°29′32.3″E / 41.890222°N 12.492306°E / 41.890222; 12.492306
Location map Italy Rome.png
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Location of Properties of the Holy See in Rome
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Properties of the Holy See (Lazio)
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Properties of the Holy See (Italy)

Extraterritorial property

Non-extraterritorial property

Former extraterritorial property

Outside Rome

Extraterritorial property of the Holy See in Castel Gandolfo:
1. Papal palace with adjacent garden
2. Garden of the Villa Cybo
3. Villa Barberini, gardens and agricultural area
4. Oliveto ex-Bacelli
5. Church of San Tommaso di Villanova Extraterritorial property Castel Gandolfo.svg
Extraterritorial property of the Holy See in Castel Gandolfo:
1. Papal palace with adjacent garden
2. Garden of the Villa Cybo
3. Villa Barberini, gardens and agricultural area
4. Oliveto ex-Bacelli
5. Church of San Tommaso di Villanova

Extraterritorial property

Non-extraterritorial property

The Fundamental Accord, signed in 1993, grants property rights and tax exemptions to the Holy See over various Christian holy sites in Israel, but the agreement was never finalized because of diplomatic problems between the Vatican and Israeli governments.

See also

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References

  1. see Article 13, 14, 15 and 16 in the Lateran Treaty Archived 2011-08-13 at the Wayback Machine
  2. "CIA - The World Factbook -- Holy See (Vatican City)". Central Intelligence Agency. 2006-12-19. Retrieved 2007-01-03.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Zone exterritoriali vaticani". Website of the Holy See. Retrieved 2009-12-08.