Acta Apostolicae Sedis

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Acta Apostolicae Sedis
ACTA APOSTOLICAE SEDIS.jpg
TypeDaily official journal
Publisher Vatican City
FoundedSeptember 29, 1908 (1908-09-29)
Language Latin
HeadquartersVatican City
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Acta Apostolicae Sedis (Latin for "Register of the Apostolic See"), often cited as AAS, is the official gazette of the Holy See, [1] appearing about twelve times a year. [2] It was established by Pope Pius X on 29 September 1908 with the decree Promulgandi Pontificias Constitutiones, and publication began in January 1909. [2] It contains all the principal decrees, encyclical letters, decisions of Roman congregations, and notices of ecclesiastical appointments. [3] The laws contained in it are to be considered promulgated when published, and effective three months from date of issue, unless a shorter or longer time is specified in the law. [3] [4] [5]

Latin Indo-European language of the Italic family

Latin is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet.

A gazette is an official journal, a newspaper of record, or simply a newspaper.

Holy See Episcopal jurisdiction of the Catholic Church in Rome, Italy

The Holy See, also called the See of Rome, refers to the jurisdiction of the Bishop of Rome, known as the pope, which includes the apostolic episcopal see of the Diocese of Rome with universal ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the worldwide Catholic Church, as well as a sovereign entity of international law. Founded in the 1st century by Saints Peter and Paul, by virtue of Petrine and papal primacy according to Catholic tradition, it is the focal point of full communion for Catholics around the world. As a sovereign entity, the Holy See is headquartered in, operates from, and exercises "exclusive dominion" over the independent Vatican City State enclave in Rome, Italy, of which the pope is sovereign. It is organized into polities of the Latin Church and the 23 Eastern Catholic Churches, and their dioceses and religious institutes.

Cover page and leaf of Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Acta Apostolicae Sedis (1909) 1909 Acta Apostolicae Sedis.jpg
Cover page and leaf of Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Acta Apostolicae Sedis (1909)

It replaced a similar publication that had existed since 1865, under the title of Acta Sanctae Sedis . Though not designated as the official means of promulgating laws of the Holy See, this was on 23 May 1904 declared an organ of the Holy See to the extent that all documents printed in it were considered "authentic and official". [6] As indicated above, the Acta Sanctae Sedis ceased publication four years later.

Acta Sanctae Sedis was a Roman monthly publication containing the principal public documents issued by the pope, directly or through the Roman Congregations.

Acta Apostolicae Sedis is published in Latin.

Since 1929, Acta Apostolicae Sedis carries a supplement in Italian, called Supplemento per le leggi e disposizioni dello Stato della Città del Vaticano, containing laws and regulations of Vatican City, the city-state founded in that year. In accordance with paragraph 2 of the Legge sulle fonti del diritto of 7 June 1929, [7] the laws of the state are promulgated by being included in this supplement.

Italian language Romance language

Italian is a Romance language of the Indo-European language family. Italian descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire and, together with Sardinian, is by most measures the closest language to it of the Romance languages. Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino and Vatican City. It has an official minority status in western Istria. It formerly had official status in Albania, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro (Kotor) and Greece, and is generally understood in Corsica and Savoie. It also used to be an official language in the former Italian East Africa and Italian North Africa, where it still plays a significant role in various sectors. Italian is also spoken by large expatriate communities in the Americas and Australia. Italian is included under the languages covered by the European Charter for Regional or Minority languages in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Romania, although Italian is neither a co-official nor a regional or a traditional language in these countries, where Italians do not represent a historical minority. In the case of Romania, Italian is listed by the Government along 10 other languages which supposedly receive a "general protection", but not between those which should be granted an "advanced or enhanced" one. Many speakers of Italian are native bilinguals of both Italian and other regional languages.

Vatican City Independent city-state within Rome, Italy

Vatican City, officially Vatican City State, is an independent city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. Established with the Lateran Treaty (1929), it is distinct from yet under "full ownership, exclusive dominion, and sovereign authority and jurisdiction" of the Holy See. With an area of 44 hectares, and a population of about 1,000, it is the smallest sovereign state in the world by both area and population.

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References

  1. New Commentary on the Code of Canon Law, pg. 60.
  2. 1 2 Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford University Press 2005 ISBN   978-0-19-280290-3), article Acta Apostolicae Sedis
  3. 1 2 Modern Catholic Dictionary, reproduced at Catholic Culture
  4. 1917 Code of Canon Law, canon 9
  5. 1983 Code of Canon Law, canon 8
  6. Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Acta Sanctæ Sedis"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  7. "Leggi sulle fonti del diritto" [Read about the sources of law] (in Italian). The Vatican. 1 October 2008. Art. 1, (item) 2.

Bibliography