Cum Sanctissimus

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Cum Sanctissimus was an instruction issued on March 19, 1948, by the Sacred Congregation for Religious and Secular Institutes of the Catholic Church. The instruction clarified specific issues with respect to the approving religious institutes. [1]

Along with Provida Mater Ecclesia and Primo Feliciter (both issued by Pope Pius XII) this instruction provided the basis for Catholic secular institutes to receive their own legislation. [2]

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Canon 710
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References

  1. New commentary on the Code of Canon Lawby John P. Beal, James A. Coriden,T homas J. Green 2001 ISBN   0809140667 page 883
  2. Christian Spirituality in the Catholic Tradition by Jordan Aumann 1985 ISBN   0722019173 page 272