Military ordinariate

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A military ordinariate is an ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church, of the Latin or an Eastern church, responsible for the pastoral care of Catholics serving in the armed forces of a nation.

Catholic Church Largest Christian church, led by the Bishop of Rome

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide as of 2017. As the world's oldest and largest continuously functioning international institution, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation. The church is headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the pope. Its central administration, the Holy See, is in the Vatican City, an enclave within the city of Rome in Italy.

Latin Church Automonous particular church making up of most of the Western world Catholics

The Latin Church, also known as the Western Church or the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest particular church of the Catholic Church, employing the Latin liturgical rites. It is one of 24 sui iuris churches, the 23 others forming the Eastern Catholic Churches. It is headed by the bishop of Rome, the pope – traditionally also called the Patriarch of the West – with cathedra in this role at the Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The Latin Church traces its history to the earliest days of Christianity, according to Catholic tradition, through its direct leadership under the Holy See.

Eastern Catholic Churches Autonomous, self-governing particular Churches in full communion with the Pope

The Eastern Catholic Churches or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, and in some historical cases Uniate Churches, are twenty-three Eastern Christian particular churches sui iuris in full communion with the Pope in Rome, as part of the worldwide Catholic Church. Headed by patriarchs, metropolitans, and major archbishops, the Eastern Catholic Churches are governed in accordance with the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches, although each church also has its own canons and laws on top of this, and the preservation of their own traditions is explicitly encouraged. The total membership of the various churches accounts for about 18 million, according to the Annuario Pontificio, thus making up about 1.5 percent of the Catholic Church, with the rest of its more than 1.3 billion members belonging to the Latin Church, also known as the Western Church or the Roman Catholic Church.

Until 1986, they were called "military vicariates" and had a status similar to that of apostolic vicariates, which are headed by a bishop who receives his authority by delegation from the Pope. The apostolic constitution Spirituali militum curae of 21 April 1986 raised their status, declaring that the bishop who heads one of them is an "ordinary", holding authority by virtue of his office, and not by delegation from another person in authority. [1] It likened the military vicariates to dioceses. [2] Each of them is headed by a bishop, who may have the personal rank of archbishop. If the bishop is a diocesan rather than a titular bishop, he is likely to delegate the daily functions to an auxiliary bishop or a lower cleric.

Apostolic vicariate

An apostolic vicariate is a territorial jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church under a titular bishop centered in missionary regions and countries where dioceses or parishes have not yet been established. It is essentially provisional, though it may last for a century or more. The hope is that the region will generate sufficient numbers of Catholics for the Church to create a diocese. In turn, the status of apostolic vicariate is often a promotion for a former apostolic prefecture, while either may have started out as a mission sui iuris.

Pope leader of the Catholic Church

The pope, also known as the supreme pontiff, is the bishop of Rome and ex officio leader of the worldwide Catholic Church. Since 1929, the pope has also been head of state of Vatican City, a city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.

An apostolic constitution is the most solemn form of legislation issued by the Pope. The use of the term constitution comes from Latin constitutio, which referred to any important law issued by the Roman emperor, and is retained in church documents because of the inheritance that the canon law of the Roman Catholic Church received from Roman law.

Some nations have military ordinariates of the Anglican Communion, Lutheranism, and Eastern Orthodoxy. [3]

Anglican Communion International association of churches

The Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion. Founded in 1867 in London, England, the communion currently has 85 million members within the Church of England and other national and regional churches in full communion. The traditional origins of Anglican doctrines are summarised in the Thirty-nine Articles (1571). The Archbishop of Canterbury in England acts as a focus of unity, recognised as primus inter pares, but does not exercise authority in Anglican provinces outside of the Church of England.

Lutheranism form of Protestantism commonly associated with the teachings of Martin Luther

Lutheranism is a major branch of Western Christianity that identifies with the teaching of Martin Luther, a 16th-century German reformer. Luther's efforts to reform the theology and practice of the church launched the Protestant Reformation. The reaction of the government and church authorities to the international spread of his writings, beginning with the 95 Theses, divided Western Christianity.

The personal ordinariates for Anglicans entering the Catholic Church announced on 20 October 2009 are similar in some ways to the existing military ordinariates. [4] But the jurisdiction of military ordinariates is cumulative to that of the diocesan bishops. [5]

A personal ordinariate, sometimes called a "personal ordinariate for former Anglicans" or more informally an "Anglican ordinariate", is a canonical structure within the Catholic Church established in accordance with the apostolic constitution Anglicanorum coetibus of 4 November 2009 and its complementary norms. The ordinariates were established in order to enable "groups of Anglicans" to join the Catholic Church while preserving elements of their liturgical and spiritual patrimony. They are juridically equivalent to a diocese, "a particular church in which and from which exists the one and unique Catholic Church", but may be erected in the same territory as other dioceses "by reason of the rite of the faithful or some similar reason".

List of Catholic military ordinariates

CountryMilitary OrdinariateNotes
Africa
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Military Ordinariate of Kenya created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 20 January 1964; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Military Ordinariate of South Africa created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 17 May 1951; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986; it is vested in the Archbishop of Pretoria
Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Military Ordinariate of Uganda created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 20 January 1964; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986; vested in a Metropolitan
Americas
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Military Bishopric of Argentina created military vicariate 8 July 1957; first military vicar appointment in 1957; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Bolivia.svg  Bolivia Military Bishopric of Bolivia created military vicariate 19 March 1961; first appointment military vicar 26 July 1961; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Military Ordinariate of Brazil created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 6 November 1950; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Military Ordinariate of Canada first military bishop appointment 20 September 1939; created military vicariate 17 February 1951; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile Military Bishopric of Chile created military vicariate 3 May 1910; first military vicar appointment 27 May 1910; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia Military Bishopric of Colombia created military vicariate 13 October 1949; first military vicar appointment 14 July 1950; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg  Dominican Republic Military Bishopric of Dominican Republic created military vicariate 23 January 1958; first military vicar appointment 1958; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador Military Bishopric of Ecuador created military vicariate 30 March 1983; first military vicar appointment 5 August 1983; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of El Salvador.svg  El Salvador Military Bishopric in El Salvador created military vicariate 25 March 1968; first military vicar appointment 4 November 1968; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay Military Bishopric of Paraguay created military vicariate 20 December 1961; first military vicar appointment 7 December 1965; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Peru.svg  Peru Military Bishopric of Peru created military vicariate 15 May 1943; first military vicar appointment 13 January 1945; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA first military bishop appointment 24 November 1917; created military vicariate in November 1939; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986; headed by an Archbishop with three Auxiliary Bishops
Flag of Venezuela.svg  Venezuela Military Ordinariate of Venezuela created military ordinariate 31 October 1995; first military ordinary appointment 11 February 1996
Asia
Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia Military Ordinariate of Indonesia created military vicariate 25 December 1949; first military vicar appointment 1949; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of the Philippines.svg  Philippines Military Ordinariate of the Philippines created military vicariate 8 December 1950; first military vicar appointment 10 December 1951; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea Military Ordinariate of South Korea created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 22 November 1983; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Europe
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Military Ordinariate of Austria first military bishop appointment in 1773; created military vicariate 21 February 1959; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina Military Ordinariate of Bosnia and Herzegovina created military ordinariate 1 February 2011
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Military Ordinariate of Belgium created military vicariate 7 September 1957; first military vicar appointment in 1957; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986; vested in the Archbishop of Mechelen and Primate of Belgium
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia Military Ordinariate of Croatia created military ordinariate and first military ordinary appointment 25 April 1997
Flag of France.svg  France Diocese of the French Armed Forces first military bishop appointment in 1949; created military vicariate 26 July 1952; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Military Ordinariate of Germany first military bishop appointment 22 May 1868; created military vicariate 20 July 1933; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary Military Ordinariate of Hungary first military bishop appointment 23 March 1920; in abeyance from 1947 to 1994; created a military ordinariate 18 April 1994
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Military Ordinariate in Italy created military vicariate 6 March 1925; first military vicar appointment 23 April 1929; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland Defence Forces Chaplaincy Service Provides pastoral care, spiritual support and guidance to all members of the Defence Forces at home and on duty overseas.
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania Military Ordinariate of Lithuania created military ordinariate and first military vicar appointment 25 November 2000
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Military Ordinariate of the Netherlands created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 16 April 1957; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland Military Ordinariate of Poland created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 5 February 1919; suspended from 1947 to 1991; elevated to a military ordinariate 1991
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Military Ordinariate of Portugal created military vicariate 29 May 1966; first military vicar appointment 1966; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Military Ordinariate of Slovakia created military ordinariate and first military vicar appointment 20 January 2003
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia Military Vicariate of Slovenia created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 21 September 2000
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Military Archbishopric of Spain first appointment military bishop 4 June 1819; created military vicariate 5 August 1950; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986; headed by an archbishop
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom Bishopric of the Forces first military bishop appointment 30 October 1917; created military vicariate 21 November 1953; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Oceania
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Catholic Diocese of the Australian Defence Force first military bishop appointment in 1912; created military vicariate 6 March 1969; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Military Ordinariate of New Zealand created military vicariate and first military vicar appointment 28 October 1976; elevated to a military ordinariate 21 July 1986; currently vested in the Metropolitan of Wellington

See also

Military chaplain ministers to military personnel

A military chaplain ministers to military personnel and, in most cases, their families and civilians working for the military. In some cases they will also work with local civilians within a military area of operations.

List of patron saints associated with the military.

Blue Mass

A Blue Mass is a Mass celebrated annually in the Catholic Church for those employed in the "public safety field". The color blue relates to the blue-colored uniforms predominantly used by these services. Similar to the Red Mass, the service honors those who have died in the line of duty and those currently serving as first responders. The Mass is an opportunity for the community to show gratitude to first responders and their families.

Related Research Articles

Prelate High-ranking member of the clergy

A prelate is a high-ranking member of the clergy who is an ordinary or who ranks in precedence with ordinaries. The word derives from the Latin prælatus, the past participle of præferre, which means 'carry before', 'be set above or over' or 'prefer'; hence, a prelate is one set over others.

Personal prelature

Personal prelature is a canonical structure of the Catholic Church which comprises a prelate, clergy and laity who undertake specific pastoral activities. The first personal prelature is Opus Dei. Personal prelatures, similar to dioceses and military ordinariates, are under the governance of the Vatican's Congregation for Bishops. These three types of ecclesiastical structures are composed of lay people served by their own secular clergy and prelate. Unlike dioceses which cover territories, personal prelatures—like military ordinariates—take charge of persons as regards some objectives regardless of where they live.

An Apostolic administration in the Catholic Church is administrated by a prelate appointed by the Pope to serve as the ordinary for a specific area. The area is not yet a diocese or for a diocese, eparchy or similar permanent ordinariate that either has no bishop or, in very rare cases, has an incapacitated bishop.

Ordinary (church officer) an officer of a church or civic authority who by reason of office has ordinary power to execute laws

An ordinary is an officer of a church or civic authority who by reason of office has ordinary power to execute laws.

In the organisation of the Catholic Church and of the Anglican Communion an ordinariate is a pre- or pseudo-diocesean ecclesiastical structure, of geographical or personal nature, headed by an ordinary who is not necessarily a bishop.

Bishopric of the Forces in Great Britain

The Bishopric of the Forces is the Latin Church Catholic military ordinariate which provides chaplains to the British Armed Forces based in Great Britain and their overseas postings.

Military Ordinariate of the Philippines

The Military Ordinariate of the Philippines or MOP is the military ordinariate of the Philippines for the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Philippine National Police, and the Philippine Coast Guard. It has jurisdiction over all military, police and coast guard personnel, their dependents, and the civilian employees of all branches of the armed forces. Its titular patron is the Immaculate Conception, with SS. Ignatius of Loyola and John of Capistrano as secondary patrons. The Philippine military ordinary is the Most Rev. Oscar Jaime L. Florencio, an auxiliary bishop of Cebu.

Catholic Church in Ecuador Wikimedia list article

The Catholic Church in Ecuador comprises only a Latin hierarchy, united in a national episcopal conference, which comprises :

Diocese of Rome Diocese of the Catholic Church in Rome, Italy

The Diocese of Rome is a diocese of the Catholic Church in Rome. The Bishop of Rome or the Roman Bishop is the Pope, the Supreme Pontiff and leader of the Catholic Church. As the Holy See, the papacy is a sovereign entity with diplomatic relations, and civil jurisdiction over the Vatican City State located geographically within Rome. The Diocese of Rome is the metropolitan diocese of the Province of Rome, an ecclesiastical province in Italy. The first Bishop of Rome was Saint Peter in the first century. The incumbent since 13 March 2013 is Pope Francis.

Military Ordinariate of Canada

The Military Ordinariate of Canada is a military ordinariate (pseudo-diocese) of the Roman Catholic Church.

This is a glossary of terms used within the Catholic Church.

Catholic Military Ordinariate of Australia

The CatholicMilitary Ordinariate of Australia, is a Latin Church suffragan military ordinariate of the Roman Catholic Church immediately subject to the Holy See. It was established in 1969 and managed for administrative purposes by the Archdiocese of Sydney.

The Military Bishopric of Argentina is a military ordinariate (pseudo-diocese) of the Roman Catholic Church for the Argentine (para)military forces.

Military Ordinariate of Austria

The Military Ordinariate of Austria is a military ordinariate of the Roman Catholic Church.

Francis Joseph Walmsley was an English prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as the Bishop of the Forces from 1979 to 2002.

References