Musicam sacram

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Musicam sacram is the title of an instruction on Roman Catholic sacred music issued by the Sacred Congregation of Rites on 5 March 1967 in conjunction with the Second Vatican Council. [1] The instruction deals with the form and nature of worship music[ citation needed ] within the framework of Sacrosanctum concilium . [2] According to the document, it is not a collection of "all the legislation on sacred music; it only establishes the principal norms which seem to be more necessary for our own day." [3]

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References

Citations

Bibliography

Joncas, Jan Michael (1997). From Sacred Song to Ritual Music: Twentieth-Century Understandings of Roman Catholic Worship Music . Collegeville, Minnesota: Liturgical Press. ISBN   978-0-8146-2352-7.
Sacred Congregation of Rites (1967). Musicam Sacram . Retrieved 18 October 2017.