Canon Law Society of America

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Canon Law Society of America
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FormationNovember 12, 1939
TypeProfessional Society
HeadquartersWashington, DC
Location
  • United States
President
Zabrina Decker, JCD
Key people
Jay Conzemius, JCL, Vice President
Website
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Part of a series on the
Canon law of the
Catholic Church
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The Canon Law Society of America is a professional association dedicated to the promotion of both the study and the application of canon law in the Catholic Church. The Society's membership includes over fifteen hundred men and women who reside in forty-three countries. Not all members are Catholic.

Catholic Church Largest Christian church, led by the Bishop of Rome

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide as of 2017. As the world's oldest and largest continuously functioning international institution, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation. The church is headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the pope. Its central administration is the Holy See.

History

A group of canonists established the Canon Law Society of America on November 12, 1939, in Washington, DC, as a professional association, dedicated to the promotion of both the study and the application of canon law in the Catholic Church. The Society remains active in study and the promotion of canonical and pastoral approaches to significant issues within the Catholic Church, both the Latin or Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. Since its founding, and especially since Pope John XXIII called for the revision of the first Code of Canon Law of 1917, the Society has offered its services in the United States for the revitalization and proper application of church law. On February 13, 1981, the Society incorporated as a non-profit corporation in the District of Columbia. [1]

Structure

Board of Governors

The Society organizes its activities through an annual general meeting, at which time it elects officers and determines resolutions for future study and activity by the Society. A "Board of Governors" oversees the operations of the Society. The Board is composed of elected officers: a president, a vice-president who is president-elect, an immediate past president, a secretary, a treasurer, and six consultors. [1]

Activities

The Society convenes an annual convention and other symposia. Collaboration with other professional church organizations and learned societies is another area of the Society's involvements. Regional meetings of members of the Society also are held periodically across the United States.

The Society publishes various works in order to promote greater understanding and application of canon law.

See also

The canon law of the Catholic Church is the system of laws and legal principles made and enforced by the hierarchical authorities of the Catholic Church to regulate its external organization and government and to order and direct the activities of Catholics toward the mission of the Church. It was the first modern Western legal system and is the oldest continuously functioning legal system in the West, while the unique traditions of Oriental canon law govern the 23 Eastern Catholic particular churches sui iuris.

The 1983 Code of Canon Law, also called the Johanno-Pauline Code, is the "fundamental body of ecclesiastical laws for the Latin Church". It is the second and current comprehensive codification of canonical legislation for the Latin Church sui iuris of the Catholic Church. It was promulgated on 25 January 1983 by John Paul II and took legal effect on the First Sunday of Advent 1983. It replaced the 1917 Code of Canon Law, promulgated by Benedict XV on 27 May 1917.

The Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches is the title of the 1990 codification of the common portions of the Canon Law for the 23 Eastern Catholic churches in the Catholic Church. It is divided into 30 titles and has a total of 1546 canons. The Western Latin Church is guided by its own particular Canons.

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References

  1. 1 2 Canon Law Society of America Brochure. CLSA Publications. 2007
Other canon law societies