Primo Feliciter

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Primo Feliciter was a motu proprio issued by Pope Pius XII on March 12, 1948. [1]

Primo Feliciter was issued a year after the constitution Provida Mater Ecclesia . This motu proprio confirmed and blessed secular institutes within the Catholic Church. [1]

Along with Provida Mater Ecclesia and Cum Sanctissimus , Primo Feliciter provided the basis for Catholic secular institutes to receive their own legislation. [2]

Notes

  1. 1 2 The Church in the Modern Age (Vol 10) by Hubert Jedin, Gabriel Adriányi, John Dolan ISBN   0860120929, Hypeion Press page 327
  2. Christian Spirituality in the Catholic Tradition by Jordan Aumann 1985 ISBN   0722019173 page 272

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